top
US
US
Indybay
Indybay
Indybay
Regions
Indybay Regions North Coast Central Valley North Bay East Bay South Bay San Francisco Peninsula Santa Cruz IMC - Independent Media Center for the Monterey Bay Area North Coast Central Valley North Bay East Bay South Bay San Francisco Peninsula Santa Cruz IMC - Independent Media Center for the Monterey Bay Area California United States International Americas Haiti Iraq Palestine Afghanistan
Topics
Newswire
Features
From the Open-Publishing Calendar
From the Open-Publishing Newswire
Indybay Feature

No Place for Whales: The U.S. Military's Legacy in Indian Country: Reckless Toxic Dumping

by Brenda Norrell
From the mustard gas pit on Walker River Paiute lands, to the napalm burn site on Fallon Paiute Shoshone lands, to the undetonated bombs in the Lakota Badlands, to the experimental explosives at Fort Wingate in New Mexico and secret radioactive waste dump near the Tohono O'odham Nation capital of Sells, Arizona, to the widespread illegal hazardous waste dumping, and leaking of toxic waste, in many of the Alaskan and Hawaiian islands -- there is enough documented cancer-causing waste to fill an encyclopedia.
screenshot_2023-03-17_12.44.28_pm.png
The U.S. military's poisonous legacy in Indian country

U.S. Military's Strewn Undetonated Bombs, Napalm Burn Pits, and Secret Radioactive Waste Dumps

By Brenda Norrell
Censored News

While claiming to be defending the world, the U.S. military left behind cancer-causing, hazardous waste that is recklessly strewn across Indian country.

From the mustard gas pit on Walker River Paiute lands and napalm burn site on Fallon Paiute Shoshone lands in Nevada, to the undetonated bombs in the Lakota Badlands in South Dakota, to the experimental explosives at Fort Wingate in New Mexico and secret radioactive waste dump near the Tohono O'odham Nation capital of Sells, Arizona, to the widespread illegal hazardous waste dumping, and leaking barrels of toxic waste, in many of the Alaskan and Hawaiian islands -- there is enough documented cancer-causing waste to fill an encyclopedia.

We look at a few of the sites in our article, 'No Place for Whales.'

The deadliest remains of the Cold War remain in the soil of the Western Shoshone, where the atomic bomb was detonated at the Nuclear Test Site. Navajos and Pueblos were sent to their deaths mining uranium during the Cold War. Today, radioactive tailings remain strewn across the Navajo Nation, regardless of the United States' continual promises of cleanup.

The radioactive waste from the Church Rock, N.M., uranium spill, one of the worst in history, continues to flow through Navajo communities, and down the Rio Puerco wash in the Flagstaff, Arizona, region.

However, less publicized are the sites of strewn undetonated bombs and live shells, secret radioactive waste dumps, and pits of mustard gas and napalm.

https://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2019/09/a-slow-and-toxic-genocide.html

Top photo: The U.S. Military is still cleaning up its hazardous waste strewn and dumped in Alaska islands, at the same time that President Biden approves more oil drilling in the Arctic, detrimental to the pristine natural environment and wildlife.
§
by Brenda Norrell
screenshot_2023-03-17_12.44.43_pm.png
U.S. military strewn hazards in Alaska. With clean-up in Amaknak, Attu, and Bethel, the military cites the danger to whales.
Add Your Comments
We are 100% volunteer and depend on your participation to sustain our efforts!

Donate

$40.00 donated
in the past month

Get Involved

If you'd like to help with maintaining or developing the website, contact us.

Publish

Publish your stories and upcoming events on Indybay.

IMC Network