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Related Categories: San Francisco | Racial Justice
View events for the week of 2/10/2022
Executive Order 9066 at 80 Years: Incarceration and Reparations Then and Now
Date Thursday February 10
Time 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Event Type Teach-In
Organizer/AuthorAsian Art Museum in San Francisco
Location Details
Asian Art Museum, 200 Larkin St, San Francisco, CA 94102

Masks required and please be vaccinated/boosted. Proof of vaccine status required for cafe entry. Follow all COVID safety guidelines, especially w/ omicron variant: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/Omicron-Variant-Fact-Sheet.aspx
Executive Order 9066 at 80 Years: Incarceration and Reparations Then and Now

Location: Asian Art Museum, 200 Larkin St, San Francisco, CA 94102

Day & Time: Thursday, February 10, 6:30 PM

Cost: $5 tickets + museum entry fee
(Entry fees: Adults = $15; Seniors/College Students/Youth = $10; 12 & under FREE)

More info & tickets: https://calendar.asianart.org/event/executive-order-9066-at-80-incarceration-and-reparations-then-and-now/

AAM during COVID: https://asianart.org/what-to-expect/


Feb. 19 is the 80th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, which authorized the imprisonment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Join us to mark this occasion with an evening focusing on the forces that led to the incarceration, its current-day parallels, and reparations for both Japanese Americans and Black Americans.

The night begins with a screening of Jon Osaki’s award-winning documentary “Alternative Facts: The Lies of Executive Order 9066,” which considers the political forces and misinformation behind the incarceration and draws connections to the current scapegoating of immigrants and abuses of power.

Following the screening, the filmmaker joins Sheryl Davis, executive director of the
San Francisco Human Rights Commission, and Don Tamaki, an attorney for the plaintiff in Korematsu v. United States, for a discussion about the ties between the Japanese American redress campaign and the Black reparations movement. Former KPIX and KRON4 News anchor Wendy Tokuda moderates.

The evening also includes a shakuhachi (Japanese flute) performance by Masayuki Koga.


ABOUT THE PARTICIPANTS

Sheryl Davis is executive director of the San Francisco Human Rights Commission, where she is leading the city’s efforts to promote racial equity, including reparations for the Black community.

Masayuki Koga is a master shakuhachi (Japanese flute) player and teacher and the founder and director of the Japanese Music Institute in Berkeley, California. He started learning the Kinko school of shakuhachi with his father, Kiichi Koga, and then studied both the Kinko and Tozan schools with Kazan Saki in Tokyo. He has performed in most major cities in Canada, Germany, and Japan. Koga collaborated with new age musician Kitaro on a Grammy-nominated CD project, represented Japan at the World Cultural Festival in Cuba, and performed solo at the World Shakuhachi Festival in Kyoto, Japan.

Jon Osaki is an award-winning filmmaker who has directed and produced promotional, educational, narrative, and documentary films. His initial interest in film grew from his desire to share the stories of the Japanese Community Youth Council, where he has served as executive director since 1996. He is currently producing film projects for the Stop Repeating History campaign focusing on social justice issues such as the movement for Black reparations and dispelling the model minority myth.

Don Tamaki, senior counsel at Minami Tamaki LLP, was a lead attorney in the landmark Supreme Court case Korematsu v. the United States, which overturned Fred Korematsu’s conviction for refusing as an American citizen to be incarcerated during World War II on account of his racial ancestry. Tamaki is past member of the board of Glide Foundation and is board president of the San Francisco Japantown Foundation.

Wendy Tokuda is an award-winning journalist who anchored evening news broadcasts in California for nearly 35 years, including on KPIX-TV, the San Francisco CBS affiliate, and KRON4 News.

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SAFETY DURING COVID

Please wear a mask and be vaccinated/boosted.

Follow all COVID safety protocols, especially with rise of the omicron variant: https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/COVID-19/Omicron-Variant-Fact-Sheet.aspx

If you have the following symptoms, please DO NOT participate in person. Even if you test negative for COVID-19 but have any of these symptoms, please refrain from in-person events:
--Fever or chills
--Cough
--Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
--Fatigue
--Muscle or body aches
--Headache
--New or sudden loss of taste or smell
--Sore throat
--Congestion or runny nose
--Nausea or vomiting
--Diarrhea
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Added to the calendar on Saturday Jan 1st, 2022 11:38 AM
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by Asian Art Museum in San Francisco
Saturday Jan 1st, 2022 11:38 AM
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