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Social Security retirees are being excluded from affordable housing projects
by Lynda Carson (tenantsrule [at] yahoo.com)
Friday Jan 4th, 2019 6:47 AM
According to the Social Security Administration, the average social security income for retirees during 2018 was $1,422 per month or $17,064 annually. The average social security income for retirees is currently only $1,461 per month for 2019, or $17,532 annually. Unfortunately, for many social security retirees, their income is not high enough to move into many so-called affordable housing projects in the Bay Area!
Social Security retirees are being excluded from affordable housing projects

By Lynda Carson - January 4, 2019

Reportedly, during 2018, a family of four with a salary of $117,400 annually qualifies as low-income in San Francisco, Marin County, and San Mateo County, meaning that they qualify for affordable housing that is subsidized by the federal government.

In Berkeley, a family of four earning $89,000 annually qualifies for affordable housing, and in Oakland a family of 4 earning $89,600 annually qualifies for affordable housing.

According to the Social Security Administration, the average social security income for retirees during 2018 was $1,422 per month or $17,064 annually. The average social security income for retirees is currently only $1,461 per month for 2019, or $17,532 annually. Unfortunately, for many social security retirees, their income is not high enough to move into many so-called affordable housing projects in the Bay Area.

Considering that there are so many persons that qualify for affordable housing with incomes way higher than what retirees on social security make in a year, it appears that many affordable housing developers are excluding social security retirees from their affordable housing projects.

According to the research I have done, it reveals that many affordable housing developers are excluding retirees on social security from their affordable housing projects with what are known as “minimum income requirements.”

As an example, during December of 2018 at Martin Luther Towers, an affordable housing project in San Francisco, studio apartments were going for $1,036-$1,252 per month, and to reside there, 1 person must have a minimum income of $28,219 annually.

Considering that the average social security income for retirees during 2018 was $1,422 per month or $17,064 annually, and is currently only $1,461 per month for 2019, or $17,532 annually, it appears that retirees on social security are being excluded from Martin Luther Towers because of the minimum income requirements.

During November of 2018 in Oakland, at Town Center and Courtyards at Acorn, owned/managed by Bridge Housing, they have a minimum income requirement of $2,145-$4,775 per month for anyone wanting to rent a 1 bedroom apartment, which is more than the average social security retiree earns per month.

Social Security retirees are also being excluded at Wicklow Square in Dublin, CA, owned by Eden Housing. The affordable housing project has a minimum income requirement of $24,500 annually, which is way more than the average social security retiree earns annually.

During November of 2018, the Lakeside affordable housing project in Concord, owned by Resources for Community Development (RCD), has a minimum income requirement which requires that the renter must earn “2x the rent”, of $935 per month for a 1 bedroom apartment, that excludes social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

The Riley Court Apartments in Concord, managed by the John Stewart Company, has a minimum income requirement of “twice the rent” which is $760 per month for the rent, and is excluding social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month in 2018.

The Church Lane affordable housing project in San Pablo, managed by the John Stewart Company, has a minimum income requirement of $2,187-$2,645 per month for their 1 bedroom apartments, which excludes social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month in 2018.

In Sausalito, the Doretha Mitchell Apartments, owned by Bridge Housing, are excluding social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually, because this project has a minimum income requirement of $34,443 annually for someone to rent a 1 bedroom apartment.

The Case Vista affordable housing project in San Rafael, has a minimum income requirement of $34,443 for one person in their 1 bedroom apartments, which excludes social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually, unless they have a Section 8 housing voucher (Housing Choice Voucher).

In East Palo Alto, the Peninsula Park affordable housing project, owned by Bridge Housing, has a minimum income requirement of $2,456-$2,896 for one person, in a 1 bedroom apartment, excluding social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually, in November of 2018.

In October of 2018, the Western Park Apartments affordable housing project in San Francisco, had a minimum income requirement of “double the rent” which was $1,036 per month for a studio, that excludes social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

During August of 2018, the Crescent Cove affordable housing project in San Francisco, had a minimum income requirement of $29,370 for a studio apartment, excluding the average social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

The 150 Van Ness Apartments affordable housing project in San Francisco, owned or managed by housing.sfgov.org, had a minimum income requirement of $2,280 a month for a studio apartment, excluding the average social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

The affordable housing project called Metro @ Show Place Square in San Francisco, owned or managed by housing.sfgov.org, has a minimum income requirement of $3,998, excluding the average social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

In August of 2018, the Pinole Grove Senior Housing affordable housing project owned by Bridge Housing, had a minimum income requirement of $17,568 for a 1 bedroom apartment, excluding the average social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

During July of 2018, the Ava affordable housing project owned by Avalon Communities in San Francisco, had a minimum income requirement of $3,035 per month for a 1 bedroom apartment, excluding the average social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

The Vara affordable housing project owned by Monogram Residential Vara REIT, LLC, had a minimum income requirement of $3,035 per month in July 2018, for a 1 bedroom apartment, excluding the average social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

In Berkeley, the 732 Haste Street affordable housing project, had a minimum income requirement of $3,987.50 for one person in a 1 bedroom apartment, excluding the average social security retirees only earning $1,422 per month, or $17,064 annually.

As my research reveals, affordable housing is only affordable to those who can afford to reside in the so-called affordable housing projects in the Bay Area.

Making matters worse, with the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) rushing to privatize our nation’s public housing units as soon as possible, by converting them into so-called affordable housing units, this would result in even fewer units of low-income housing available for seniors and retirees depending on their monthly social security income to survive on.

Lynda Carson may be reached at tenantsrule [at] yahoo.com

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