top
Newswire
Calendar
Features
From the Open-Publishing Calendar
From the Open-Publishing Newswire
Indybay Feature
Related Categories: U.S. | Health, Housing & Public Services
Food Advertising Undermining Healthy Food Advocates
by Meaganj650@gmail.com (johnsmea [at] sonoma.edu)
Sunday Dec 2nd, 2018 9:21 PM
People are concerned abut the rising rates of unhealthy people in America. They turn to eating habits and lack of exercise to explain these rising concerns. However, as we try to change eating habits by implamenting rules such as the Healthy- Hunger free kids Act of 2010 to target children, or rising sugary beverage tax, food advertising continues to persuade the public what to eat. Are we truly doing the best we can or should we change the way food advertisements promote food?
Healthy food advocates push for healthier eating, yet food advertisements continue to persuade people what to eat. In 2010 Barack Obama signed the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. This act extended the free lunch program and set nutrition standards for schools. With the intention to lower childhood Obesity, Michelle Obama also promoted the food pyramid. While this act was able to help more than 21.5 million American school children get free or reduced lunch, outside of schools marketing teams are still promoting unhealthy food choices. Unhealthy food choices are represented through various advertisements, which influences what a person chooses to consume. The way we advertise food has convinced Americans what they believe is the right way to eat. Food marketing teams are promoting an unhealthy lifestyle and convincing Americans that it is Ok to consume larger portion sizes and low-quality food. We are blindly accepting these marketing tactics who are not looking out for the consumer’s health. Michelle Obama aims to lower childhood obesity, but it is difficult to help these children when advertisements are encouraging them to consume larger unhealthy quantities. 40% percent of 16-19 year olds are currently obese. This Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act is a step in the right direction, but we have to change how we promote food to have a greater and lasting impact on society.