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Kwanzaa: Preserving Pan African Heritage in the "Farm to Fork Capitol of America"
by Khubaka, Michael Harris (blackagriculture [at] yahoo.com)
Friday Dec 22nd, 2017 4:37 PM
Today’s, “California Grown” 7 day holiday was created as a Pan African expression during the US Civil Rights Movement, in the aftermath of the 1966 Watts Riot in California. Imagine, the son of a Maryland Black Tenant Farmer and Baptist Preacher helping to restore ancient Pan African Agriculture celebrations are celebrated by millions throughout the world.
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(Sacramento, CA) Join us celebrating the 7 days of Kwanzaa, “First Fruits of the Harvest in the Farm to Fork Capitol of America.”

This year we are featuring the 170th Anniversary of the Republic of Liberia, the Liberian Kwanzaa Presidential Election and broader Economic Community of West African States, ECOWAS.

Together we will share the living legacy connecting ancient Pan African migration prior and during the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, preserving the best of Southern tradition’s, and introducing authentic California Pan African Heritage along the American River Parkway in the California Gold Rush Era.

We highlight the need to preserve and showcase the “hidden figures” of early California Pan African Heritage along the American River Parkway as we prepare to break ground Spring 2018 on Carson Creek Ranch, Food and Agriculture Center and further develop our mission “finding the Gold, hidden in our underserved communities” utilizing the amazing opportunities that are available today.

Today’s, “California Grown” 7 day holiday was created as a Pan African expression during the US Civil Rights Movement, in the aftermath of the 1966 Watts Riot in California. Imagine, the son of a Maryland Black Tenant Farmer and Baptist Preacher helping to restore ancient Pan African Agriculture celebrations in Los Angeles, CA that are again being celebrated by millions throughout the world.

Our 19th Annual California Kwanzaa Celebration continues this journey by sharing our California Pan African Heritage and rich agricultural contributions throughout the world. We are proud to extend an open invitation to the broader ECOWAS community to join our California Black Agriculture Working Group in the heart of the California Central Valley, "the greatest garden in the world."

In 1966, Dr. Maulana Karenga, founded Kwanzaa as a spiritual, festive, joyous celebration of the oneness and goodness of life. Kwanzaa celebrates agriculture as a way of life. Kwanzaa is a living social practice and Kwanzaa is a time of remembering, reassessing, recommitting, rewarding and rejoicing.

Together, we expand our outreach with a full year of activity building toward a Gala 20th Anniversary of our 2018 California State Capitol Kwanzaa, showcasing a sustainable approach and scientific methodology to expand our ancient/future "first fruits of the harvest" here in Sacramento, California.

7 Principles of the Nguzo Saba (n-Goo-zo Sah-bah)
Umoja (Oo-moh-jah) – Unity
Kujichagulia (Koo-jee-ch-goo-lee-ah) – Self-Determination
Ujima (Oo-jee-mah) Collective Work and Responsibility
Ujamaa (Oo-jah-mah) Cooperative Economics
Nia (Nee-yah) – Purpose
Kuumba (Koo-oom-bah) – Creativity
Imani (Ee-mah-nee) – Faith

Kwanzaa is best celebrated at home with extended family each day of the holiday. Large and festive public gatherings are now mainstream and diverse in the offering. The fundamental of a Kwanzaa ceremony focuses upon the principle of that day and a shared understanding the meaning. Everyone, especially the children, are encouraged to participate and identify practical ways to incorporate the principles of Kwanzaa into everyday life, year round.

Kwanzaa Symbols
Mkeka (Mm-kay-kah) – Straw mat (Symbolizing foundation – our tradition and history)
Kinara (Ka-nah-rah) – Candleholder (Symbolizing our ancestors)
Mishumaa Saba (Mee-shoo-mah) Seven candles (Symbolizing the seven principles)
Vibunzi (Vee-boon-zee) - Ears of corn (Symbolizing our children)
Mazao (Mah-zah-oh) - Fruit and vegetables (Symbolizing cultivation and productive labor)
Kikombe Cha (Kee-khom-bay-cha) - Unity cup (Symbolizing unity)
Zawadi (Zah-wah-dee) – Gifts (Symbolizing commitments made and kept)

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