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View other events for the week of 5/10/2017
The Songs of Trees: David Haskell in Conversation with Elizabeth Allison
Date Wednesday May 10
Time 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Location Details
California Institute of Integral Studies
1453 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Event Type Class/Workshop
Organizer/AuthorCIIS Public Programs and Performances
Emailpublicprograms [at] ciis.edu
Phone415-575-6175
Pulitzer Prize finalist David Haskell's book The Forest Unseen earned acclaim for eloquent writing and deep engagement with the natural world. His newest book, The Songs of Trees, explores nature's most magnificent networkers.

In The Songs of Trees, Haskell repeatedly visits a dozen trees around the world—exploring their connections with webs of fungi, bacterial communities, cooperative and destructive animals, and other plants. By unearthing charcoal left by Ice Age humans and petrified redwoods in the Rocky Mountains, Haskell shows how the Earth's climate has emerged from exchanges among trees, soil communities, and the atmosphere. Now humans have transformed these networks-powering our societies with wood, tending some forests, but destroying others. Haskell also examines trees in places where humans seem to have subdued nature—a pear tree on a Manhattan sidewalk, an olive tree in Jerusalem, a Japanese bonsai—demonstrating that wildness permeates every location.

Every living being is not only sustained by biological connections, but is made from these relationships. Haskell shows that this networked view of life enriches our understanding of biology, human nature, and ethics. When we listen to trees—nature's great connectors—we learn how to inhabit the relationships that give life its source, substance, and beauty.
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Added to the calendar on Thursday Apr 20th, 2017 2:27 PM
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