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Related Categories: Central Valley | Arts + Action
View other events for the week of 7/ 3/2009
Screening - Battleship Potemkin
Date Friday July 03
Time 7:00 PM - 11:00 PM
Location Details
Movies on a Big Screen at The Guild Theater. 2828 35th St, Sacramento (corner of 35th & Broadway).
Event Type Screening
Organizer/AuthorMovies on a Big Screen
Emailscreenings [at] moviesonabigscreen.com
Friday July 3. 7 and 9:00 PM
Admission: $5.00
Movies on a Big Screen at The Guild
2828 35th St, Sacramento, CA (corner of 35th & Broadway)

Sergei Eisenstein's film of the famed Odessa revolt has been one of the landmarks of cinema since its release. Commissioned by the government to commemorate the failed uprising of 1905, it's without stars or even actors in the usual sense, exemplifying the collectivism it celebrates. The Battleship Potemkin has just returned from the war with Japan, its crew near mutiny because of brutal treatment and bad rations. When they're served maggot-infested meat one morning, the sailors finally rebel. One of the sailors, Vakulinchuk (Aleksandr Antonov), dissuades the officers from firing upon the mutineers, and they join the rest of the crew in revolt. Hearing of the mutiny, the people of Odessa send supplies to express their solidarity with the crew and gather en masse to mourn a slain sailor. The czar's troops arrive to dispel the crowd. In perhaps the most famous sequence in film history, the director rhythmically intercuts shots of the troops marching machinelike down the Odessa steps with shots of innocent citizens being killed and wounded, in a brilliant embodiment of the director's theories of montage. Aside from "Citizen Kane," perhaps the most perfectly constructed film ever made, the film's vision of tyranny and rebellion remain as powerful today as it was in 1925.
Added to the calendar on Wednesday Jul 1st, 2009 12:33 PM
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