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10/16: Poor People's March and Low-Wage Workers Community Congress
by Poor People's March
Monday Oct 10th, 2005 10:59 PM
At 11:30 a.m. on October 16, the Poor People's March will assemble at 16th Street and Mission Street in San Francisco.
Poor People's March and Low-Wage Workers Community Congress
Start:
October 16, 2005 - 11:30am
Location:
San Francisco, CA

What are you doing on Sunday, October 16 – "National Boss Day"? We hope that you will be joining us for the Poor People's March and the Low-wage Workers Community Congress. Working people are under an unprecedented assault by Big Business. Their wages are being devalued, their health benefits and pensions cut and their right to organize threatened. On the federal, state and local level, there is a constant stream of legislation to increase profits for corporations and take away protections for workers. How do we move our legislative agenda to turn the tide? In the words of Jesse Jackson, we turn up the street heat.

At 11:30 a.m. on October 16, the Poor People's March will assemble at 16th Street and Mission Street in San Francisco. The
demands of the march are: Living Wage Jobs, Universal Health Care, Affordable Housing, Quality Education, and Progressive Taxation of Corporations and the Wealthy. We will march up Mission Street to Horace Mann Middle School on 23rd Street, between Mission and Valencia, where we will hold a Low-wage Workers Community Congress. At the Congress, we will discuss the issues that are impacting the lives of working people and provide training they need for the oncoming political and labor struggles. The Poor People's March and Low-wage Workers Community Congress will
generate urgency on the ground to turn-out working people for the November special election.

For further information, please call (415) 863-5543. Thanks in advance for
your support.

* *

Join the march to demand:

- Living Wage Jobs

- Universal Health Care

- Affordable Housing

- Quality Public Education

- Progressive Taxation of Corporations and the Wealthy

Sunday, October 16

11:30 a.m. – Assemble at 16th St. and Mission

12 noon– March to Horace Mann Middle School

Low-wage Workers Community Congress

1 p.m. – program

2 p.m. – open mike

3 p.m. to 5 p.m. – skills workshops

Horace Mann Middle School
3351 – 23rd Street, San Francisco

For more information, call (415) 863-5543; fax (415) 863-5543; email
sflivingwage [at] gmail.com

Comments  (Hide Comments)

by Gigahertz Inc.
Wednesday Oct 12th, 2005 10:39 AM
http://www.SpareSomeChange.com is the homeless search engine I made, please give this web address to panhandlers and homeless people (they can use free computer/internet at the library). I have made many other websites, but they do not relate to this blog (another story). I care about the poor and forgotten as I was once part of the "out crowd", poor and homless in the past...
by taxpayer
Wednesday Oct 12th, 2005 3:35 PM
With all due respect, if these people are so poor, why aren't they working or looking for better jobs instead of protesting? They could get higher paying jobs to pay taxes like they want to impose on the "wealthy." Why do you want the "wealthy" to pay higher taxes than the ones who are not working so hard?
by to "taxpayer"
Wednesday Oct 12th, 2005 5:15 PM
Do you really believe that the ones making more money are 'working harder'????
by taxpayer
Wednesday Oct 12th, 2005 9:06 PM
Yes, most people making money work harder and have worked harder. My senior partners are making a few hundred thousand dollars each. They have technical degrees and law degrees. They also put everything on the line to start a law office. They also work nights and weekends. I make very good money and I worked hard to get my degrees.

All of the people I know that make over 100k have worked very hard and have put a lot on the line to get where they are. They didn't just complain that there weren't enough handouts. By the way, they now employ others.
by Jess
(jvioletta [at] gmail.com) Sunday Oct 16th, 2005 12:10 AM
are you trying to say the school teachers, nurses and bus boys don't work hard, don't pay taxes? What about the bus boy in my sisters resturant who is a lawyer from Argentina but when his countries economy went under because of the debt they were in from international lending agencies, everyone was out on the street even if you had a 'white collar' job like he did.

I think you need to read some. You need to educate your self about the systems of oppression that were created in the united states to privledge some and not others. You need to recognize that white middle class people are treated with privaledge and people of color are not. You need to remember the civil rights movement in this country. Read Tim Wise, Elizabeth Betita Martinez. Recognize that only when we all pull the people up who are at the bottom we all rise.
by Jess
(jvioletta [at] gmail.com) Sunday Oct 16th, 2005 12:17 AM
are you trying to say the school teachers, nurses and bus boys don't work hard, don't pay taxes? What about the bus boy in my sisters resturant who is a lawyer from Argentina but when his countries economy went under because of the debt they were in from international lending agencies, everyone was out on the street even if you had a 'white collar' job like he did.

I think you need to read some. You need to educate your self about the systems of oppression that were created in the united states to privledge some and not others. You need to recognize that white middle class people are treated with privaledge and people of color are not. You need to remember the civil rights movement in this country. Read Tim Wise, Elizabeth Betita Martinez. Recognize that only when we all pull the people up who are at the bottom we all rise.
by aaron
Sunday Oct 16th, 2005 2:33 PM
Argentina's leaders were showered with praise by the IMF and the US government in the late 90's when the Argentine bubble was inflating and the foreign capitalists were making a bundle there. Everyone knew that government corruption was rife, but so long as money was made hand-over-fist Argentina was hailed as vindication of the neo-liberal model. When the Argentine economy began to melt-down--the neo-liberal policies having bankrupted the country--suddenly we were hearing from people like Steve that corruption was to blame.



by Taxpayer
Monday Oct 17th, 2005 10:45 AM
Jess, issues were raised of shifting the tax burden to the wealthy and providing all this free insurance, which the wealthy would then wind up paying. I say this is not fair. In my business, we are taxed heavily. If taxes are raised any more, we would consider cutting health insurance or personel. How would you explain the benefits of taxing us higher to employees who now have to pay a portion of their health insurance or who are going to be cut?

With regard to your sister, ask her if she pays the busboy the same that she earns. Your sister took a risk by starting the resteraunt and now has the burden of running the resteraunt. She should be compensated accordingly. Otherwise, there would be no insentive to start a resteraunt that employs the busboy.

Everyone should pay taxes, not just the wealth. In fact, I think we should all pay 17% with no execptions or exemptions.

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