top
From the Open-Publishing Calendar
From the Open-Publishing Newswire
Indybay Feature
Related Categories: Palestine | International
Mossad Behind Hariri
by hassan hanizadeh&louis bettencourt
Friday Feb 18th, 2005 12:35 AM
Former Lebanese prime minister Rafiq Hariri was killed in a massive bomb blast in central Beirut on Monday.

The explosion destroyed a number of public buildings and vehicles, showing that the complicated terrorist act was carried out by a well equipped organization.

The situation in Lebanon and the region is now so critical that any discord could cause a new crisis for this small but strategic country.

Lebanon, which has been the cradle of peaceful coexistence among different religious and ethnic groups, experienced a 15-year civil war due to a series of domestic, regional, and international factors in the 1970s and 1980s.

The war left thousands of Muslim and Christian civilians dead, causing Lebanon huge financial losses.

In 1990, the various groups finally put aside their differences and calm and national unity ruled the country again.

Then, following the Zionist army's defeat in south Lebanon in 2000, Lebanon was once more put into the worldwide spotlight.

Lebanon eventually regained its regional economic position thanks to reconstruction and economic restoration, partly due to the efforts of the late Hariri.

However, regional and trans-regional powers such as the United States and the Zionist regime are trying to steer Lebanon toward a crisis, aiming to extend their military and political presence in some parts of the Middle East and the Mediterranean.

The United States? strong support of UN Resolution 1559, which requires Syria to withdraw its forces from Lebanese soil, is part of Washington?s plan to politically influence Lebanon and the region once again.

Israel and the U.S. seek to sever the spiritual and physical contacts between Syria and Lebanon in order to isolate Syria in the Middle East and check its political sway in the region.

Neither the Lebanese government nor the majority of its citizens want Syrian troops to quit their country.

However, if Syrian forces withdraw from Lebanese territory, it would surely pave the way for the political and military machinations of the United States and Israel.

The Lebanese and Syrian nations, due to their historical, ideological, and ethnic affinities, are in fact one nation in two separate lands. The regional and trans-regional powers must understand this and must realize that the two nations cannot be separated spiritually.

Now, the question is: Who benefited from the assassination of Hariri, a man who played a constructive role in the reestablishment of security in Lebanon?

All the evidence indicates that the Israeli intelligence service Mossad killed Hariri, since it had previously plotted to assassinate important Lebanese politicians.

The Mossad is trying to help the Zionist army claw its way back into Lebanon, since history has shown that the stability of Lebanon is not to the advantage of Israel.

Lebanon now faces a more complicated situation and should stay alert in order to thwart the Zionist regime's plots to dominate the country once again.

http://www.tehrantimes.com/
by 1984
Friday Feb 18th, 2005 9:22 AM

BEHIND HARIRI MURDER
« A Clean Break:
A New Strategy for Securing the Realm »
http://www.israeleconomy.org/strat1.htm

MORE : READ THE STRATEGIC PLAN OF THE NEOCONSERVATIVES RULING THE STATES YOU ‘LL UNDERSTAND THE T ACTICALS ACTS REALIZED BY THESE GANGSTERS :

http://www.newamericancentury.org/

About the neoconservatives , the best web site

http://www.eurolegal.org/useur/usneocon.htm




« An indication of the Neoconservative attitude to Israel comes from the report of an Israeli study group in 1996 written for the incoming Netanyahu government in Israel. The Group Leader was none other than Richard Perle of the American Enterprise Institute and the other participants were: James Colbert, Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs, Charles Fairbanks, Jr., Johns Hopkins University/SAIS, Douglas Feith, Feith and Zell Associates, Robert Loewenberg, President, Institute for Advanced Strategic and Political Studies, Jonathan Torop, The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, David Wurmser, Institute for Advanced Strategic and Political Studies, and Meyrav Wurmser, Johns Hopkins University.

Extract from « A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the Realm »
« ... Early adoption of a bold, new perspective on peace and security is imperative for the new prime minister. While the previous government, and many abroad, may emphasize "land for peace"— which placed Israel in the position of cultural, economic, political, diplomatic, and military retreat — the new government can promote Western values and traditions. Such an approach, which will be well received in the United States, includes "peace for peace," "peace through strength" and self reliance: the balance of power. ...

Syria challenges Israel on Lebanese soil. An effective approach, and one with which American can sympathize, would be if Israel seized the strategic initiative along its northern borders by engaging Hizballah, Syria, and Iran, as the principal agents of aggression in Lebanon...

Israel can shape its strategic environment, in cooperation with Turkey and Jordan, by weakening, containing, and even rolling back Syria. This effort can focus on removing Saddam Hussein from power in Iraq — an important Israeli strategic objective in its own right — as a means of foiling Syria’s regional ambitions. Jordan has challenged Syria's regional ambitions recently by suggesting the restoration of the Hashemites in Iraq. This has triggered a Jordanian-Syrian rivalry to which Asad has responded by stepping up efforts to destabilize the Hashemite Kingdom, including using infiltrations. Syria recently signaled that it and Iran might prefer a weak, but barely surviving Saddam, if only to undermine and humiliate Jordan in its efforts to remove Saddam.

But Syria enters this conflict with potential weaknesses: Damascus is too preoccupied with dealing with the threatened new regional equation to permit distractions of the Lebanese flank. And Damascus fears that the 'natural axis' with Israel on one side, central Iraq and Turkey on the other, and Jordan, in the center would squeeze and detach Syria from the Saudi Peninsula. For Syria, this could be the prelude to a redrawing of the map of the Middle East which would threaten Syria's territorial integrity.

Since Iraq's future could affect the strategic balance in the Middle East profoundly, it would be understandable that Israel has an interest in supporting the Hashemites in their efforts to redefine Iraq, including such measures as: visiting Jordan as the first official state visit, even before a visit to the United States, of the new Netanyahu government; supporting King Hussein by providing him with some tangible security measures to protect his regime against Syrian subversion; encouraging — through influence in the U.S. business community — investment in Jordan to structurally shift Jordan’s economy away from dependence on Iraq; and diverting Syria’s attention by using Lebanese opposition elements to destabilize Syrian control of Lebanon. ...

King Hussein may have ideas for Israel in bringing its Lebanon problem under control. The predominantly Shia population of southern Lebanon has been tied for centuries to the Shia leadership in Najf, Iraq rather than Iran. Were the Hashemites to control Iraq, they could use their influence over Najf to help Israel wean the south Lebanese Shia away from Hizballah, Iran, and Syria. Shia retain strong ties to the Hashemites: the Shia venerate foremost the Prophet’s family, the direct descendants of which — and in whose veins the blood of the Prophet flows — is King Hussein. ...

Israel has a chance to forge a new relationship between itself and the Palestinians. First and foremost, Israel’s efforts to secure its streets may require hot pursuit into Palestinian-controlled areas, a justifiable practice with which Americans can sympathize. ... »

A key element of peace is compliance with agreements already signed. Therefore, Israel has the right to insist on compliance, including closing Orient House and disbanding Jibril Rujoub’s operatives in Jerusalem. Moreover, Israel and the United States can establish a Joint Compliance Monitoring Committee to study periodically whether the PLO meets minimum standards of compliance, authority and responsibility, human rights, and judicial and fiduciary accountability. ...

To anticipate U.S. reactions and plan ways to manage and constrain those reactions, Prime Minister Netanyahu can formulate the policies and stress themes he favors in language familiar to the Americans by tapping into themes of American administrations during the Cold War which apply well to Israel. If Israel wants to test certain propositions that require a benign American reaction, then the best time to do so is before November, 1996.






"Israel and the U.S. seek to sever the spiritual and physical contacts between Syria and Lebanon in order to isolate Syria in the Middle East and check its political sway in the region."

BECKY: Israel and the US seek to prevent Hizbullah from firing rockets over the Israeli border threatening the peace and stabililty of the whole region.

"Neither the Lebanese government nor the majority of its citizens want Syrian troops to quit their country. "

BECKY: Yeah, that's why the 200,000 at Hariri's funeral Wednesday were shouting "Syria out of Lebanon Now!"

"However, if Syrian forces withdraw from Lebanese territory, it would surely pave the way for the political and military machinations of the United States and Israel."

BECKY: Actually, if Syria is clearly linked to Hariri's assassination, that makes it MUCH more likely that the USA or Israel will wind up intervening.

Claiming the Mossad carried out this assassination is just absurd. Hariri advocated increasing peaceful relationships with Israel, not increased hostilities. The USA State Dept. Head was invited to the funeral by the family, but the current pro-Syrian occupation President was openly dis-invited.

Israel had no clear motive to assassinate Hariri and plenty of motive to see him succeed. However Syria, which just last fall pressured the Lebanese legislature to amend their constitution so the current pro-Syria President could extend his term by three years, had plenty of motive.

The popular former Prime Minister and billionaire, was considered unbribable. He had openly resigned in protest of the Syrian interference, and said he would run again on a platform calling for the ousting of Syrian troops on Lebanese soil.

This article claims up is down and then condemns (who else? The Jews!) for walking on the ceiling.



by JA
Friday Feb 18th, 2005 8:15 PM
BECKY'S BRAIN!!: An Amazing 'Interview' With Becky Johnson of Santa Cruz, by JA

http://www.indybay.org/news/2005/02/1719944_comment.php#1722028

SHE'S A REAL CHARACTER DOWN THERE IN SANTA CRUZ!!


For more, later, see (Becky Johnson):

Examiner ad demonizes Palestinian children, shows young girl with gun
http://santacruz.indymedia.org/newswire/display_any/14842/index.php#15929


Albert Einstein Condemned Israeli Nazis
http://santacruz.indymedia.org/newswire/display_any/15529/index.php#15842


Elise Cohen of The Fellowship Of Reconciliation talks about upcoming delegations to Israel
http://santacruz.indymedia.org/newswire/display_any/14711/index.php


... YYYEP...!! SHE'S A **WACKO**!!
by ANGEL
Saturday Feb 19th, 2005 12:43 AM
>>>The Mossad is trying to help the Zionist army claw its way back into Lebanon, since history has shown that the stability of Lebanon is not to the advantage of Israel.<<<FROM ABOVE ARTICLE>

After hearing a Syrian ambassador speak, I do not know who should be blamed but I do not think Syria had anything to do with it. Why would they want to commit such an act that would only go to cause them more problems then they already have? they would have nothing at all to gain. Without Hezbollah Israel would try to take land in the north, just as they have been taking the Palestinian land in the West Bank and Gaza for their own use without any thought to what it is doing to the Palestinian People.
The best way to solve this conflict in the Middle-East is to allow the Palestinian People to have the Borders of their State which is called for in the Road Map to Peace finalized, thereby ending the reason for the conflict. Once this has been done and the True Borders for Israel inside its pre 1967 (Green Line) borders, Palestine in the West Bank and Gaza, Lebanon with its southern borders firmly in place and guarded by the Lebanese. Then maybe the need for Hezbollah in Lebanon will no longer be needed. Once Lebanon has secure borders that the Israelis cannot cross over into, Hezbollah can return to Syria and help serve as part of the Syrian Military to protect Syria from attack or aggression. Why do we choose to close our eyes to the way the Middle East sees the problem and only look at the Israelis as victims even though they are the ones who are doing the Occupying and Oppressing? Israel is spending a small fortune on a wall/fence/ barrier, why not put it on the green line where it can be permanent and do some good instead of putting it inside the West Bank where the Future Palestinian State should be and it only go to make the conflict worse. Why don’t Lebanon and Syria build a Wall/fence/barrier on their Southern border that way the border will be defined and no one can dispute it if Israel tries to grab land past the Wall/fence/barrier.
Good Fences make Good neighbors if the Fences are put on ones own property, but the neighbors will not be so friendly if you try to build your fence on the neighbors property….

by Scott Peterson; angel did it!!
Saturday Feb 19th, 2005 1:06 AM
Scott Peterson; angel did it!!
by ANGEL
Saturday Feb 19th, 2005 5:22 AM
>>>The Mossad is trying to help the Zionist army claw its way back into Lebanon, since history has shown that the stability of Lebanon is not to the advantage of Israel.<<<FROM ABOVE ARTICLE>

After hearing the Syrian ambassador speak, I do not know who should be blamed but I do not think Syria had anything to do with it. Why would they want to commit such an act that would only go to cause them more problems than they already have? They would have nothing at all to gain, except that Assad Jr. may have been acting Unreasonably in a way I do not understand and can not fathom. Without Hezbollah Israel would never try to take land in the north, and this is unrelated to what has happened in the West Bank and Gaza where Palestinians have been trying to expel Jews from their lands without any thought to what it is doing to the Israeli People.
The best way to solve this conflict in the Middle-East is to allow the Israeli People to have the Borders of their State finalized, thereby ending the reason for the Conflict. Once this has been done and the True Borders for Israel beyond its pre 1967 (Green Line) Borders, Palestine in Part or None of the West Bank and Gaza, Lebanon with its southern Borders firmly in place and guarded by the Lebanese Army, Syria and its army out of Lebanon. Then there will be absolutely no need for Hezbollah in Lebanon. Once Lebanon has secure Borders that the Syrians cannot cross over into, Israel can call off its aerial patrols in Lebanese aerial space and the Syrian Military will be able to protect and guard Syria's own Borders from attack or aggression. Why do we choose to close our eyes to the way the Middle East sees the problem and only look at the Israelis as aggressors even though they are the ones who are being threatened by Hizballah's Terrorism and Violence? Israel is spending a small fortune on a fence/ barrier, why not put it even more beyong the Green Line where it can be permanent and do some good instead of putting it almost entirely along the Green Line where the Future Palestinian State should not be and it only goes to make the conflict worse. Why doesn’t Lebanon build a Wall/fence/barrier on their Eastern Border that way the Border will be defined and Syria can not dispute it if it tries to grab land past the Wall/fence/barrier.
Good Fences make Good neighbors if the Fences are put on ones own property, but the neighbors will not be so friendly if you try to build your fence on the neighbors property….
by ANGEL
Saturday Feb 19th, 2005 9:21 PM
Why its ANGEL imposter!! at it again...

You have some interesting views and ideas...Why not use your own name or handle so you can have full credit!!

And the ones who disagree with ANGEL can know who they are disagreeing with....

>>>The Mossad is trying to help the Zionist army claw its way back into Lebanon, since history has shown that the stability of Lebanon is not to the advantage of Israel.<<<FROM ABOVE ARTICLE>

After hearing a Syrian ambassador speak, I do not know who should be blamed but I do not think Syria had anything to do with it. Why would they want to commit such an act that would only go to cause them more problems then they already have? they would have nothing at all to gain. Without Hezbollah Israel would try to take land in the north, just as they have been taking the Palestinian land in the West Bank and Gaza for their own use without any thought to what it is doing to the Palestinian People.
The best way to solve this conflict in the Middle-East is to allow the Palestinian People to have the Borders of their State which is called for in the Road Map to Peace finalized, thereby ending the reason for the conflict. Once this has been done and the True Borders for Israel inside its pre 1967 (Green Line) borders, Palestine in the West Bank and Gaza, Lebanon with its southern borders firmly in place and guarded by the Lebanese. Then maybe the need for Hezbollah in Lebanon will no longer be needed. Once Lebanon has secure borders that the Israelis cannot cross over into, Hezbollah can return to Syria and help serve as part of the Syrian Military to protect Syria from attack or aggression. Why do we choose to close our eyes to the way the Middle East sees the problem and only look at the Israelis as victims even though they are the ones who are doing the Occupying and Oppressing? Israel is spending a small fortune on a wall/fence/ barrier, why not put it on the green line where it can be permanent and do some good instead of putting it inside the West Bank where the Future Palestinian State should be and it only go to make the conflict worse. Why don’t Lebanon and Syria build a Wall/fence/barrier on their Southern border that way the border will be defined and no one can dispute it if Israel tries to grab land past the Wall/fence/barrier.
Good Fences make Good neighbors if the Fences are put on ones own property, but the neighbors will not be so friendly if you try to build your fence on the neighbors property….


by Yemen Times Staff (reposted)
Saturday Feb 19th, 2005 11:05 PM

Surely, Scott McClellan, the White House Press Spokesmen finger pointing at Syria for the tragic bomb attack that did away with one of the most influential personalities of Lebanon, politically and economically, is somewhat hasty and even suspicious. The fires of the burning cars and edifices has not even been put out, and there is Scott McClellan telling the world that it was Damascus. Of course, as is usual with the Bush Administration, McClellan was unable to give any substantive reasoning for this outright accusation. McClellan said there was no evidence to substantiate his condemnation of Syria. The Bush Administration seems to think that its finger pointing is sufficient to be accepted as sound judgment, just like the random imprisonment of hundreds of people without having to revert to any due process of any kind or even a plausible argument to substantiate any links with “terrorism”. Ironically, most of these prisoners are no more than small fry, if they indeed do have links with “Al-Qaeda”, while the big fry are still enjoying their liberty and arms length distance from any American enforcement or military authority. Maybe, as one American friend suggested, Bin Laden’s or Zerqawi’s continued presence is actually essential to the Bush and friends agenda, even if they might not be even living anymore!

Whatever the case, it is just impossible that Washington has the magic crystal ball that allows it to incriminate anyone it wants to without even having to produce any shred of evidence. The observer is inclined to believe that, notwithstanding the position of Rafiq Al-Hariri, vis a vis the Syrian influence in Lebanon (and not necessarily the presence of Syrian troops), there is no plausible logic to suggest that Syria would undertake the killing of a prominent personality like Hariri, because the sensitivity of Syria’s presence in Lebanon would dictate that Syria would not seek to raise any possible further Lebanese discontent with Syria’s presence in Lebanon, which is already ignited by Israeli and American prodding. Furthermore, Hariri’s position would not have really become so much of an influence in Syrian involvement in Lebanon, because Hariri never outright called for Syrian total withdrawal from Lebanon, which would mean a mean a retraction to the days when right wing Lebanese Christians sought to satisfy the Israeli agenda for Lebanon in the late 1970s and early 1980s. In fact, it was thanks to the Syrian presence in Lebanon that Hariri could find the peaceful climate to advance his business interests. Furthermore, Syria would not find favor in antagonizing the Saudis, with whom Hariri has a long established business and congenial relationship, Riaydh still maintain generally strong relations with Damascus and it was the Saudis who helped to create the venue for the Syrian presence by the Taif Agreement that stipulated for the Syrian deployment in Lebanon.

The messy explosions of the likes that hit Hariri are not far from the capabilities of the Israeli Mossad or supra-intelligence organ, whose activities in Lebanon have ample resources and an ugly record of explosions and abductions and outright murder like the Sabra and Shatilla massacre and the brutal death of even its own Lebanese allies, who have maybe turned sour in Tel Aviv’s view. Starting with the bombing of the King David Hotel in Jerusalem, in which the Israeli “terrorists”, as they were called in the days of the British Mandate over Palestine, did away with a number of British officers, in gratitude for the Balfour Declaration and all the facilities the British gave for Jewish immigration to Palestine, the Israeli state has undertaken several assassinations of prominent personalities including Secretary Generals of the United Nations. Why does not Washington first study a little history and ask what happened to Trigvele and Dag Hammarskjold? If Washington will continue to look at the Israeli state as the bastion of angelic behavior in the region, then we cannot expect the US to substantiate any hopes for orchestrating a truly genuine peace for the region. Israel would love nothing more than to unleash “ethnic” feuding again in Lebanon, because it wants to take advantage of its cozy relationship with the White House to settle scores with the Lebanese, for kicking them out of their turf so humiliatingly. They figure the death of Hariri would entice factional feud again in Lebanon and thus call for American or Israeli intervention under one pretext or another to “secure” Israel’s northern border or whatever excuse. In fact, they would not even bother trying to make any plausible justification, since as one Israeli reporter for Haaretz said, Sharon and Bush see eye to eye on just about everything, especially the fight against Islamic terrorism. What about Israeli terrorism? That is not in the White House vernacular and will never be so, because the Americans have had to rely on several doses of Israeli intelligence in their misguided Iraqi adventure. The idea is that the Israelis are more versed in dealing with the Arabs and have an inkling of how to control Islamic terrorism, at least that is how George W. Bush sees it.

On another note, there has always been a strange pattern that has developed in the region. Whenever the situation is cooled down in the West Bank and Gaza, the heat is turned on in Lebanon. We have seen this quite often, especially when Sharon is at the helms.

http://yementimes.com/article.shtml?i=817&p=opinion&a=1
by ANGEL
Sunday Feb 20th, 2005 5:31 AM
Why its ANGEL imposter!! at it again...

You have some interesting views and ideas...Why not use your own name or handle so you can have full credit!!

And the ones who disagree with ANGEL can know who they are disagreeing with....

>>>The Mossad is trying to help the Zionist army claw its way back into Lebanon, since history has shown that the stability of Lebanon is not to the advantage of Israel.<<<FROM ABOVE ARTICLE>


After hearing the Syrian ambassador speak, I do not know who should be blamed but I do not think Syria had anything to do with it. Why would they want to commit such an act that would only go to cause them more problems than they already have? They would have nothing at all to gain, except that Assad Jr. may have been acting Unreasonably in a way I do not understand and can not fathom. Without Hezbollah Israel would never try to take land in the north, and this is unrelated to what has happened in the West Bank and Gaza where Palestinians have been trying to expel Jews from their lands without any thought to what it is doing to the Israeli People.
The best way to solve this conflict in the Middle-East is to allow the Israeli People to have the Borders of their State finalized, thereby ending the reason for the Conflict. Once this has been done and the True Borders for Israel beyond its pre 1967 (Green Line) Borders, Palestine in Part or None of the West Bank and Gaza, Lebanon with its southern Borders firmly in place and guarded by the Lebanese Army, Syria and its army out of Lebanon. Then there will be absolutely no need for Hezbollah in Lebanon. Once Lebanon has secure Borders that the Syrians cannot cross over into, Israel can call off its aerial patrols in Lebanese aerial space and the Syrian Military will be able to protect and guard Syria's own Borders from attack or aggression. Why do we choose to close our eyes to the way the Middle East sees the problem and only look at the Israelis as aggressors even though they are the ones who are being threatened by Hizballah's Terrorism and Violence? Israel is spending a small fortune on a fence/ barrier, why not put it even more beyong the Green Line where it can be permanent and do some good instead of putting it almost entirely along the Green Line where the Future Palestinian State should not be and it only goes to make the conflict worse. Why doesn’t Lebanon build a Wall/fence/barrier on their Eastern Border that way the Border will be defined and Syria can not dispute it if it tries to grab land past the Wall/fence/barrier.
Good Fences make Good neighbors if the Fences are put on ones own property, but the neighbors will not be so friendly if you try to build your fence on the neighbors property….
by Becky Johnson
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 10:43 AM
Hariri resigned from the Lebanese govt. last fall because of Syrian pressure which resulted in a constitutional amendment to extend the term of the Syrian-puppet President another 3 years!!

Four days before the bombing, Hariri called for recognizing the State of Israel . And Hariri promised to run for PM this spring on a Syria out of Lebanon platform!

While the facts may not fit your Israel-bashing desires, its nuts to state the opposite of what is occurring just to win a point.

Currently, Lebanese protesters ( a rareity in Arab countries) are calling for the President to resign and for the 15,000 Syrian troops to leave and end the Lebanese occupation.
by Sefarad
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 11:29 AM

I sent here a couple of articles from different media about why Syria is to blame, and a post stating I had read that the Syrians opposed an investigation by the UN.
by Sefarad
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 11:32 AM

I could find this one I sent to another thread

http://www.indybay.org/news/2005/02/1722990_comment.php#1723231
by some facts
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 12:22 PM
Sorry I dont have time to provide the links, but you can look on Google and should be able to find some of this stuff.

1. It now looks like it wasnt a suicide bomb, it was a large explosive burried under the road set of by remote control. This means there had to be come coordination between those who recently made road repairs and the bombers but it also makes the argument that it had to be fundamentalists because it was a suicide bombing a nonargument.

2. Syria has been hurt by this bombing and it will likely get them pushed out of Lebanon with or without US pressure. That doesnt mean that those who carried out the bombing could have predicted this but it does suggest that it probably wasnt organized from too high up unless senior officials in Syria are that short sighted. Hariri's had been pressuring to get Syria to disengage from Lebanon but his popularity made myterdom after assasination pretty predictable. If the intent was intimidation they would have chosen lower levl peopel who were less well known since in death Hariri seems to have more power than he did in life.
by Sefarad
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 12:29 PM

It seems to me that perhaps they wanted to kill Hariri so that anyone who wanted the Syrians out of Lebanon would be scared.
by perhaps
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 12:39 PM
" It seems to me that perhaps they wanted to kill Hariri so that anyone who wanted the Syrians out of Lebanon would be scared. "

Perhaps Syria was too stupid to predict the results, but assasinations in the region have almost always increased the power of those assasinated when the people killed have been public figures. Add to that the recent increase in US charging of Syria with suporting terrorism and you get something that doesnt look like a situation where killing a lader in Lebanon would help Syrian interests. I doubt the peopel behind the bombing will every really be known, but while I wouldnt put it past elements in the Syrian secuirty forces from having carried out this action (or proSyrian Lebanese militias) I really really doubt the Syrian leadership itself could have known or approved of it (unless they have suddenly become stupid and have grown out of touch and dont have accurate intelligence on Lebanse public opinion)

A rogure antiSyrian Lebanese militia (perhaps former Phlange types) or perhaps an Iranian backed group would make more sense in terms of the results helping those who carried out the action, but thats assuming most militias really think two steps ahead (which seems doubtful)
by Sefarad
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 12:43 PM

Because in the first times of the occupation the Syrians killed important people, one of them being Gemayel, and there they still are.

by perhaps
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 1:00 PM
"Because in the first times of the occupation the Syrians killed important people, one of them being Gemayel, and there they still are."

There could have been an antiSyrian backlash but the immediate result of the killing was the massacre of hundreds in Sabra and Shatila so the world and the Lebanese reacted to that more than the one killing.

There is also a slight difference because Gemayel was just elected and by assasinating him a government was brought down that then needed to be re-constituted making the immediate reaction of political conflict to fill the void a predictable outcome. In Hariri's case he was already out of power so the aftermath of the assasination was solely one of outrage and while it may have stopped him from organizing against Syria there was no chance of it creating the same sort of power vacuum you got when Gemayel was killed. I tend to think assasinations of leaders always results ina backlash but I guess you do have a point in Gemayel's case and perhaps one could also say the same about Rabin's assasination. Both Gemayel and Rabin's deaths effectively helped the cause of the assassins since the immediate outcry was followed by a need to find new leaders who proved to be weaker than those assassinated. But, unless you really think that Hariri was such a good organizer that the outrage over his death wont amount to as much as he could have achieved through his connections while alive that logic cant be applied to his assasination.

Iran and right-wing Lebanese who disliked Syria and also disliked Hariri make a lot more sense as suspects. But not knowing all of Hariri's private business dealings (he was a billionaire) I cant know if there are not even more probable suspects who disliked Hariri for less political reasons and just didnt care about the fallout from his death. On a personal level a lot of people could have had a lot to gain from his death for purely economic reasons ( from his son, to competitors to ...)
by Sefarad
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 1:04 PM

When Gemayel was killed, the Lebanese were already fed up with massacres. How can they be now after so many year of killings and occupation?
by background (a lot of money= a lot of enemies)
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 1:07 PM
He became the personal contractor for Prince Fahd, now king of Saudi Arabia, amassing a fortune that propelled him into the US magazine Forbes as one of the richest 100 men in the world.

One conservative estimate puts his fortune at $2bn, and his business interests in Lebanon include owning a vast media empire.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/910166.stm

He commanded an empire spanning banking, media, property and construction that stretched from Saudi Arabia to the US and bought him a ticket to politics.

Among other posts, Hariri was president and chairman of Saudi Oger, which controls 60 percent of local cellular operator Cell C.

His admirers hailed him as the saviour of the war-ravaged economy and a philanthropist who used his wealth to help those less fortunate.

For his detractors, he was a spendthrift whose grand ideas dragged a feeble economy deeper into debt and used sky-high interest rates to stabilise the Lebanese pound.

http://www.busrep.co.za/index.php?fArticleId=2413906

The most prevalent rumor about Hariri in Beirut, and one that has had wide circulation inside the Washington policymaking community, is that Hariri was not the self-made billionaire that some commentators have so vociferously averred. Rather, he was the illegitimate son of King Fahd of Saudi Arabia -- whose liaison with Hariri's mother in Beirut gave the "self-made" billionaire access to the Saudi royal family, and its lucrative building contracts.

"Well, no one knows if the rumor is true, of course," one intelligence officer responded, "and really, it doesn't seem to matter. But the Saudis certainly had a hand in making Hariri the most powerful figure in Lebanon for fifteen years. He couldn't have done it without them." Nor is it much of a secret that after the Taif Accords that ended the Lebanon Civil War were signed in Saudi Arabia in October of 1989, it was the Saudis who promoted Hariri as a figure of unity -- a businessman who could united Lebanon's factions.

http://www.thisisrumorcontrol.org/node/1682
by Sefarad
Thursday Feb 24th, 2005 1:10 PM
"There could have been an antiSyrian backlash but the immediate result of the killing was the massacre of hundreds in Sabra and Shatila so the world and the Lebanese reacted to that more than the one killing. "


The killing of Gemayel was preceded by the killing of many thousand Christians (and some Muslims) and the world didn't move a finger.

And the world reacted against what happened in Sabra and Shatila because the Palestinians were involved and so they could put the blame on Israel.