top
From the Open-Publishing Calendar
From the Open-Publishing Newswire
Indybay Feature
Related Categories: U.S. | Global Justice and Anti-Capitalism
Economic 9/11 Coming?
by Bill Burro
Thursday Nov 25th, 2004 11:32 PM
Dollar crashing, national debt exploding, massive trade deficits...can another 9/11 be expected, this time of the economic variety? The cynically minded will imagine that the Bush Reich will welcome the opportunities provided by total economic chaos and destruction in Amerika. Why? Because they make the game rules and profit...
If we see an economic crisis, say, beginning
with a $US freefall and inability to refinance
the national debt except at *much* higher
interest rates (the Armageddon Option in other
words), then what will the Bush Reich do?

Will they work on the problem? Or, as with
the other 9/11, will they view the disaster
as an opportunity to pursue unrelated agendas
that can be packaged and promoted as part of
the solution -- regardless of the fact that
their prescriptions are likely to have zero
healing power, any more than repealing the
estate tax and the billionaires' taxes created
jobs in the U.S. (many jobs were created in
other countries as the loot fled America,
but that is another story...)

The whole wish list comes out when the economic
9/11 hits: eliminating all corporate taxes by
peddling something called "elimination of the
IRS and income tax" and introduction of a
"national sales tax"; eliminating the ability
of individuals to sue corporations by capping
damages at absurdly low levels (thus preventing
individuals from obtaining lawyers); and of
course, "privatizing" social security, meaning
of course abandoning future beneficiaries or
ensuring their payouts are trivially meaningless
(especially after the economic 9/11.)

It can be no coincidence that Congress recently
passed a law allowing free repatriation of
foreign assets by U.S. corporations -- at a 5%
tax rate, if performed by year end 2005. By
year end 2005 the $US may be worth as much
as a Mexican Peso, and the corporados can
bring back their money and take over everything
else!

I'm pretty sure the smart Republicans got their
money out of the country in time. That's how
the game is played. All that is left here is
debts owed at fixed rates, which will swiftly
be rendered valueless by inflation and the
devalued $US. Along with pensions obligations
and the like...

Speaking of which, this chap says, "Game Over"
http://www.dailyreckoning.com/home.cfm?loc=/body_headline.cfm&qs=id=4286

In reality, it is just the start of another
game. Money to the pols and mega-wealthy is
about gamesmanship and power, not about "investing"
or using money as a productive tool for doing
something good or patriotic. And I don't know
how many milliionaire "Christian" televangelists
and pastors are out there, but the number is
probably in the hundreds, maybe many thousands...
It's all a game, divorced from morality and
principles.

We'll see how this shit goes down. I bet $10
that the politicians come up with another plan
to "protect us" from their own follies.

What can *we* do? Abandon the Democrats and
their donkey idol. Become a burro instead -- you
know how stubborn and uncooperative little
burros can be when they want to! Zero cooperation
with the "they" that have inflicted the coming
economic 9/11 on "us". You know of whom I speak,
I trust...

[P.S. But don't forget to treat each other well, even
as the hard times hit. Work together, for a change?
Ha. Anyone who can organize crowds of people will
be in a position to effect change. And that doesn't
necessarily require money, just good ideas and
a big shot of charisma. ]

=======================
fyi:
http://www.cme.com/trading/dta/del/globex2.html?crl=f

http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=EURUSD=X&t=5d&l=on&z=l&q=l&c=sekusd=x,audusd=x,xauusd=x,xagusd=x


by myself
Friday Nov 26th, 2004 10:57 AM
I agree, we are heading for some craziness in the very near future. What we need is a revolution of community! we need to teach people that they don't really need the system as much as most people think. All that is needed for survival is food, water, shelter, clothing and love. I think the biggest problem in these times will be food and water. As with the 'great depression', agriculture was one of the first things hit, and crippled. People are more likely to do as their told when they are starving and food is offered. Malnutrition also has a VERY dire effect on ones psycology and ability to perform (not a very good position to be in to be able to stand up for yourself and loved ones!)
My dream is, for lack of a better way to put it, is an inner city agricultural revolution. Groups of people banding togeather and growing their own food in the city (i realize that the logistics could be difficult, but...). The University of Calgary has been working on a completely natural, simple, and inexpensive way to clean water by filtering it through a series of layers of sand (and that's it)(I'm not positive how it works, but they say that it does, and use it in the developing third world.) Things like this are absolutly possible!! they may be difficult, but they can be done!
We need to teach people that there is safety in numbers. The system works on the devide and conquer phylosophy. We've been taught pretty much from birth to hate this race, fear that race, this sex is weaker than the other one, and that your own neighbor wants to kill you. This is crap!!! Really, we're only different because we've been told to be! DONT BELIEVE THE BRAINWASHING!!!!.
IT'S ABOUT TIME THAT WE GOT THE FRICKEN BALLS TO STAND UP FOR OURSELVES, instead of just waiting for the powers that be (that think of you as nothing more than a DUMB ASS COW IN A SLAUGHTER HOUSE!!) to change their ways and protect us. Sorry to kill your party, but it's not going to happen! WE have to do it OURSELVES!! STAND UP AND TAKE YOUR FREEDOM!!! Freedom, and happiness start in your own head. Learn how you've been brainwashed (don't be ashamed, we've all fallen for it to some degree). Learn to barter, set up a bartering network. The only difference between boom and depression is the size of the money supply; people still want to work, there are still resources, the only problem is that the crack that we call money isn't there anymore. Money that they control more than most people know!

THE TIME IS NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

my 2 cents
by cp
Friday Nov 26th, 2004 11:24 AM
Have you seen how the government is trying to psychologically prep the little kids watching cartoons for the future endtimes?

National security ads message hits home

By STEPHEN KIEHL and ABIGAIL TUCKER

The Baltimore Sun


A little girl with big brown eyes sits at the kitchen table eating cereal. Milk dribbling down her chin, she asks innocently, “So, Mom, what if something happened? Should I stay where I am and wait for you or go to Grandma’s house since it’s closest? Is there a place we all meet? What should I do?”

The ad, soon to appear on television, is part of a U.S. Department of Homeland Security campaign to encourage families to develop plans in case of a terrorist attack.

The attention-grabbing campaign, unveiled this week, uses sweet young children and haunting music to strike an emotional chord — but perhaps an overly dark one, some fear.

“I’m concerned that it will lead to a bogeyman mentality,” said Ned Gaylin, professor emeritus of family studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. “We talk to kids about not talking to strangers. We don’t tell them they could rape you. We don’t tell them they could put a gun in your mouth.

“You want to give kids the truth. You don’t necessarily want to give them the whole truth.”

Previous public service campaigns by the Homeland Security Department featured Secretary Tom Ridge talking about being prepared — hardly gripping television.

Hoping to draw more notice, the department enlisted BBDO Worldwide — known for such touching campaigns as GE’s “We Bring Good Things to Life” — to create a new series of ads.

One is called “Family.” It shows two young boys and a girl, apparently siblings, watching television in a dark room, the light from the TV flickering on their faces. “How do we keep in touch with each other if the phones don’t work?” asks one boy. An announcer urges the viewer to go to http://www.ready.gov for more information.

The ads will run during donated time on network and cable television. Exact times have not been determined, but Homeland Security has requested the ads run only during adult programming.

Those who made the ads intend for them to make an immediate impact.

“This is not like placing a McDonald’s spot that will run five times during prime time,” said Kathy Crosby, a senior vice president at the Ad Council, which developed the ads with BBDO for the government. “We have to make every piece of communication compelling. It’s gotta count. We hope these ads really spark a dialogue among families.”

Print and radio ads also will be a part of the campaign. Crosby said the Ad Council has contacted 28,000 media outlets about running the ads, which were produced for the government pro bono.

It’s not the first time the government has used children in public service ads aimed at preparing for an attack. In the early days of the Cold War, black-and-white TV ads showed schoolchildren getting under their desks in an orderly fashion as part of “duck and cover” drills to protect themselves from nuclear war.

Wartime stresses have long worn on the psyches of American children, said Philip Leaf, director of Johns Hopkins University’s Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence.

But this new crop of public service messages could unsettle today’s parents, as well as their children, said Sheri Parks, an associate professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. “Children look up for other children’s faces and voices,” she said.

What they see might disturb them, she said. The ads she has viewed are dark and forbidding.

“I don’t think this ad helps children to cope with fears they already have,” she said, “and for smaller children, it will introduce new fears.”

Parks said that no matter what time the commercials air, some children will see them. But Fran Favretto, director of the University of Maryland’s Center for Young Children, said that might not be a bad thing. She sees the ads as “a prompt,” a potential avenue for important discussions between parents and children.

Advertising executives praised the spots as effective and resonant. They said the production values are clearly high. The ads appear to be shot on film, with good lighting and good direction. And the use of children is captivating, the executives said.

“It’s a very emotional, effective way to reach parents because the first thought of any parent if, God forbid, anything were to ever happen would be ‘Where are my children,’” said Abe Novick, a senior vice president at Eisner Communications, a Baltimore marketing agency.

“I think this is a gentle approach with a cautionary undertone to it.”

John Patterson, the co-creative director at MGH Advertising in Owings Mills, Md., also said the ads worked well and fell on the right side of the line when it comes to using children.

“It’s clear they’re playing the guilt card. I think it’s very smart the way they did it,” Patterson said. “As a parent, you can’t help but respond to these. The guilt works. Using kids always has an effect, and it’s the kind of thing that could backfire, but I don’t think these will.”

But Patterson said the ads could scare children if they don’t have an opportunity to discuss them with their parents.

by ^-^
Friday Nov 26th, 2004 11:31 AM
Do you want to know of a great site for inner city agriculture. Baltimore! There are supposedly 900,000 houses for 675,000 people. All these places were abandoned, so there's tons of vacant lots and boarded up houses that you can often acquire almost for free. There was a reason why people initially settled and built there. Flat temperate land is good for agriculture - why bother going to Mendocino (which has 3% flat land) or the forests around Eugene. Look at the type of fancy houses that were abandoned in some of these photos:

http://jeffcovey.net/photos/baltimore/neighborhood/