top
From the Open-Publishing Calendar
From the Open-Publishing Newswire
Indybay Feature
Related Categories:
China is in search of an ally
by JosephKim
Friday Jul 7th, 2017 2:17 AM
The meeting of Russian President Putin and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping, tow strongmen presently determining political climate in Europe and Asia, appears to have had far more substantial content than it has been reported in the Xinhua press-release.

WxpHn92.jpg

The meeting of Russian President Putin and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping, tow strongmen presently determining political climate in Europe and Asia, appears to have had far more substantial content than it has been reported in the Xinhua press-release. Officially, the leaders of the two huge states were exchanging views on Syria and the Korean Peninsula. Their final statements devoted to ways of reaching settlement via dialogue and refusal from any outward aggressive "reformatting" detrimental to national sovereignty were quite predictable. This has been the long lasting position of Moscow and Beijing over decades. Was this meeting of the two political heavy-weights having extremely tight schedules just waste of time? Was their meeting meant to confirm once again commitment to their widely known political principles? Can it be just trivial "synchronization of watches"? To add more meat to these questions, Putin and Xi Jinping had a meeting in Beijing in mid-May during the One Belt One Road forum, and once again at the beginning of June in Astana, Kazakhstan' capital, at the SCO summit. Interestingly, the major part of the Moscow meeting was in the closed-door format with the access for the reporters denied.

And so the question arises - what was the real aim of the Chinese leader's visit to Moscow? What's the hidden agenda of this visit? The prompt may be found in the president Xi's statement emphasizing the need to "steadfastly support each other in pursuing development paths and defending respective sovereignty, national security and development interests". And what actually makes Xi Jinping so worrisome in the sphere of the Chinese national security that he sees no reason now for urgent solution on the North Korea nuclear missile program?

The answer lies somewhere near the Pacific Ocean Eastern coast. The United States in their military doctrine since the end of 19th century have been relying on the approach of two vice-admirals. They are Philip Colomb with his theory of the "sea dominance" and Alfred Mahan, the author of the "naval might" theory. Since that time the hegemon-fleet able to win in the battle against any rival and shuffle war activities closer to the enemy shore has become idee fixe with the USA. That's why the naval beefing-up of China is seen in Washington as direct challenge to their naval and consequently their world hegemony. Despite the closest and mutually beneficial economic bonds with China, the USA keeps treating it as an American hypothetical rival in the inevitable future military conflict on the sea. Quite recently U.S.S. Stethem conducted one more in the series of American provocations in the South China Sea. It entered the waters near a disputed island claimed by China and guarded by its naval and air forces. The political leaders of China appear to be perfectly aware of the USA political elite posture. The perspective of the clash with the most powerful military might on the planet is their huge worry. Present Chinese interest in a strong and reliable political partner that may become its military ally in future is due to this fear.

by DLi
Saturday Jul 8th, 2017 3:50 AM
J. Kim lays out some provocative points but his post lacks overall focus. Is the recent US military escalation in Western Pacific a case of Imperialism in search of an enemy? Or is China's One Belt One Road economic strategy--combined with a modernization of its armed forces--an example of an expansionist Chinese nationalism? Keen observers are anxiously watching the developing "Great Pacific Game" that pits the declining but still lethal--and, under T-rump's reign, extremely trigger-happy--Bald Eagle hegemon against an awakening plus increasingly assertive Eastern Dragon. Will the impending Korean nuclear standoff be the beginning of aggressive confrontations between Washington and Beijing? Perhaps we will get some enlightenment from a subsequent J. Kim posting?