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Wednesday Sep 17
7:30PM Years of Living Dangerously
Thursday Sep 18
7:30PM Diane Ackerman: The Human Age: The World Shaped...
Sunday Sep 21
1PM People's Climate March
Tuesday Sep 23
7PM Film: Hawaii, A Voice for Sovereignty
Wednesday Sep 24
7:30PM Years of Living Dangerously
Thursday Sep 25
6:30PM Buffalo Field Campaign West Coast Roadshow
Friday Sep 26
7PM Buffalo Field Campaign Road Show
Saturday Sep 27
10AM WE LOVE WATER! A Water Conservation Fair
6PM Mattole Forest Defenders Benefit Dinner w/ Music,...
7PM Free Screening of 'The Wisdom to Survive', a Film...
More Events...

New Data Shows California Drift Gillnets Not Sustainable, Continue to Kill Marine Mammals The National Marine Fisheries Service has released new data showing that the California-based drift gillnet fishery targeting swordfish killed an estimated 53 marine mammals from May 2013 through January 2014. Fishery observers monitored 34 percent of the drift gillnet sets made last year; they documented that the fishery killed an estimated three California gray whales, six short-finned pilot whales, nine northern right whale dolphins, nine California sea lions and 26 short-beaked common dolphins.

“Every year that drift gillnets are used off the California coast to catch swordfish, the result is that iconic whales, dolphins, sea turtles, sharks and thousands of fish are ensnared and killed as bycatch,” said Geoff Shester, California campaign director for Oceana. “Ultimately this gear type must be fully prohibited off the West Coast so we can have a sustainable swordfish fishery.”

In a letter sent to the regional Pacific Fishery Management Council — the 14-member voting body tasked with advising the Fisheries Service on federal fishery management — Oceana requested that this gear type used to catch swordfish be prohibited in all waters off the U.S. West Coast, and during any transition period that “hard caps” be established on the total number of whales, dolphins, sea lions, sea turtles, sharks and other fish that can be killed as bycatch. If such hard caps were reached or exceeded in any fishing season, the fishery would be shut down for the remainder of the season. The fishery is currently operating without a valid permit as required by law, meaning the federal government is knowingly allowing it to operate illegally.

Read More | See Also: Lawsuit Launched to Reinstate Protections for Endangered Sperm Whales

Previous Coverage: Swordfish Drift Gillnet Fishery Restricted to Protect Loggerhead Sea Turtles || Whales and Sea Turtles Win One: No Driftnet Expansion in California
Water Warriors Rally at Trinity River Fish Hatchery On August 27, over 200 Tribal Members and Leaders, river advocates and politicians attended a day of celebration on the Trinity River below Lewiston Dam. It was a day that the Bureau of Reclamation designated as a “Multicultural Day,“ so the Hoopa Valley Tribe organized an event to demonstrate the impacts of water diversion on their culture and the river communities.

It was also a day for giving thanks and celebrating culture and tradition. Tribal Officials talked of a sense of relief for having water flowing in decent amounts down the Trinity River, providing cooler water for spawning salmon to make their epic journeys back to the places of their birth. Members of the Yurok, Hoopa Valley and Karuk tribes, as well as leaders of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe, displayed signs and banners with slogans including “Fish Need Water,” “Let The River Flow,” "Give Us Our Water, " "Save The Salmon," "Tribal Rights Are Non Negotiable," "Release The Dam Water," "Undam the Klamath - Free the Trinity," "Central Valley agri-giants are killing salmon", "Fish Can't Swim In Money," and "Westlands Sucks The Trinity Dry."

The event began right before noon when the “Water Warriors,” those who have protested in defense of the Trinity in recent weeks, walked from the gate at the entrance into the hatchery where they convened at a stage. The “Water Warriors” wore t-shirts donated by Hoopa Valley Tribal Fisheries with “Free Our River” emblazoned on the front and carried an array of signs and colorful banners. Many of those “Water Warriors” had participated in a direct action protest at the Bureau of Reclamation Offices in Sacramento on August 19, organized by the Klamath Justice Coalition and Got Water?, that helped pressure Reclamation to increase releases into the Trinity River below the dam to avert a fish kill on the lower Klamath.

imc_photo.gifRead More with Photos | See Also: imc_photo.gifTribal members rally in Sacramento to stop Klamath River fish kill
After 90 Percent Decline, Federal Protection Sought for Monarch Butterfly The Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety as co-lead petitioners joined by the Xerces Society and renowned monarch scientist Dr. Lincoln Brower filed a legal petition on August 26 to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking Endangered Species Act protection for monarch butterflies, which have declined by more than 90 percent in under 20 years. During the same period it is estimated that these once-common iconic orange and black butterflies may have lost more than 165 million acres of habitat — an area about the size of Texas — including nearly a third of their summer breeding grounds.

The population has declined from a recorded high of approximately 1 billion butterflies in the mid-1990s to only 35 million butterflies last winter, the lowest number ever recorded. The overall population shows a steep and statistically significant decline of 90 percent over 20 years. In addition to herbicide use with genetically engineered crops, monarchs are also threatened by global climate change, drought and heat waves, other pesticides, urban sprawl, and logging on their Mexican wintering grounds. Scientists have predicted that the monarch’s entire winter range in Mexico and large parts of its summer range in the states could become unsuitable due to changing temperatures and increased risk of drought, heat waves and severe storms.

“We’re at risk of losing a symbolic backyard beauty that has been part of the childhood of every generation of Americans,” said Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity. “The 90 percent drop in the monarch’s population is a loss so staggering that in human-population terms it would be like losing every living person in the United States except those in Florida and Ohio.”

Read More | Petition: Tell The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to Protect the Threatened Monarch Butterfly
Tunnel Opponents Rally Against Brown Water Plan Restore the Delta (RTD) and many other groups held a large rally at the State Capitol on July 29, featuring the delivery of a “Death of the Delta" coffin containing thousands of public comments opposing Governor Jerry Brown’s peripheral tunnels.

Hundreds of people, including fishermen, Tribal leaders, environmentalists, Delta farmers and environmental justice advocates, rallied to protest Jerry Brown’s tunnel plan and to call for a new Draft Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS). The protest was held on the final day of the public comment period for the BDCP. The opponents charged that the EIR/EIS process has been “fatally flawed” due to its lack of public outreach to non-English speakers, failure to present a funding plan, exclusion of any non-tunnels alternative, and scientists’ identification of numerous “red flags.”

The rally opened with a blessing by Caleen Sisk, Chief and Spiritual Leader of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe, who said, “We ask that the Great Creator look down on our hearts and open our minds so we can see the good things and that the good people will wake up to join this effort to protect the waters of not only California but the world. All of the waters are connected." Chief Sisk emphasized that rather than growing export crops on drainage impaired land on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley, California is one of four salmon states in the U.S. and should rebuild the salmon population for economic, cultural and spiritual reasons. Salmon now contribute many billions to the New Zealand economy – and California should embrace its role as a salmon state.

imc_photo.gifRead More with Photos | See Also: Delta tunnel opponents ask Brown to release water bond language | Greenwashing Destruction: Fake marine “protection” and Brown’s tunnels | Bay Delta Conservation Plan Officials Suppress Freedom of Speech | PPIC Poll: 51 percent of likely voters would back $11.1 billion water bond

Previous Coverage: Hundreds Oppose Governor Brown’s Massive Water Export Tunnels at State Capitol Rally || New California Water Grab for Fracking and Agribusiness
California Court Rules Against Dangerous Oil Development Near Pinnacles National Park Citing concerns about water use and contamination, a Monterey County Superior Court judge has ruled that San Benito County unlawfully approved a dangerous new oil-development project near Pinnacles National Park that could result in hundreds of wells being drilled in important agricultural and wildlife habitat in the Salinas Valley watershed. As the judge’s ruling notes, “There are numerous opportunities for toxic spills to occur that the County has apparently not contemplated.”

The ruling comes in response to a lawsuit brought by the Center for Biological Diversity challenging the Indian Wells project, which would use cyclic steam injection, a water-intensive and polluting form of oil extraction. The court agreed that San Benito County unlawfully failed to consider development of the oil field beyond the initial 15 “pilot” wells in the challenged approval as required by the California Environmental Quality Act. The court also found that the county failed to properly analyze the huge water usage, water pollution risks, greenhouse gas emissions, and threats to the California condor — even from the initial 15 well approval.

The project site drains to the Salinas River, an important source of drinking and irrigation water for some of the world’s most productive farmland. The site is also important foraging habitat for the California condor, a critically imperiled species with a population of only about 430 individuals. “This legal victory helps protect California’s water, wildlife and climate from dangerous new oil development,” said Kassie Siegel, director of the Center for Biological Diversity’s Climate Law Institute. “It makes no sense to fast-track dirty and risky new oil projects when it’s painfully obvious we have to shift to clean energy sources to respond to the climate crisis.”

Read More | Center for Biological Diversity

Previous Coverage: Lawsuit Targets San Benito County's Approval of 15 Oil Wells in Endangered Condor Habitat || San Benito County Residents Reach Signature Goal for Fracking Ban Initiative
Swordfish Drift Gillnet Fishery Restricted to Protect Loggerhead Sea Turtles In response to pressure from conservation groups, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced an area closure for the swordfish drift gillnet fishery in the Pacific Ocean off California from July 25 through August 31 to prevent entanglements and drownings of endangered loggerhead sea turtles. This year’s El Niño conditions, warmer than normal waters, attract the endangered loggerhead sea turtles to the nutrient-rich waters where the deadly fishery operates.

This is the first time the conservation area has been closed since it went into effect over a decade ago. Today’s action came after the Center for Biological Diversity, Oceana, and Turtle Island Restoration Network called upon NMFS earlier this month in a letter urging them to implement this important closure. “We are glad to see that Pacific loggerhead turtles are now protected in California’s coastal waters,” said Todd Steiner, a biologist and executive director of Turtle Island Restoration Network. “But enough is enough. It’s time for California to follow the lead of Washington and Oregon, and close this deadly fishery to protect not only sea turtles, but also whales, dolphins and sharks regularly killed by this fishery.”

NMFS is required by law to close the more than 25,000-square-mile Pacific Loggerhead Conservation Area to protect the sea turtles during June, July and August when an El Niño event is occurring or forecasted. The seasonal closure protects loggerhead sea turtles that follow warmer waters off California in search of their preferred prey, pelagic red crabs. Although NMFS implemented the conservation area and drift gillnet prohibition almost two months late, conservation groups commend the agency for taking the proper steps to ensure protection of endangered loggerhead sea turtles as the fishery picks up in mid-August. The swordfish drift gillnet fishery operates from May 1 to January 31, but over 90 percent of the fishing occurs from August 15 through January 31.

Read More

Previous Coverage: Whales and Sea Turtles Win One: No Driftnet Expansion in California
U.S. Supreme Court Denies Drakes Bay Oyster Company Petition For Review On June 30, the United States Supreme Court denied the petition for review filed by the Drakes Bay Oyster Company, a private business that has been operating in the Point Reyes National Seashore. The company sued the Interior Department in December of 2012 after former Interior Secretary Ken Salazar decided to let their 40-year lease to expire on its own terms. This decision affirms the 9th Circuit Court of Appeal's denial of the Company's preliminary injunction lawsuit. Environmental groups now hope the Department of the Interior will set in motion a timeline for the company to remove its oyster operation from Drakes Estero.

“The Court made the right decision in upholding the long-anticipated oyster lease expiration that protects Drakes Estero, the wild ecological heart of Point Reyes National Seashore, which is particularly important on the eve of the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act,” said Amy Trainer, executive director of the Environmental Action Committee of West Marin. “We look forward to a time of healing in the community and stand ready to do our part to support the workers’ transition.”

The company has been operating for 19 months past its lease expiration under the soon-to-be-lifted court injunction. The company's workers living on-site will be allowed to remain in the housing for the foreseeable future until equivalent housing can be located, and they will receive a generous relocation package allowed under federal relocation assistance laws.

Read More | Save the Point Reyes Wilderness

Previous Related Indybay Feature: Drakes Bay Oyster Company Seeks to Privatize Point Reyes National Seashore
Preservation of Burned Area to Be Cast Aside to "Make the Timber Industry Happy" The U.S. Forest Service is proposing to log 661 million board feet of timber in the area burned by the Rim fire last summer in California’s Stanislaus National Forest. The new proposal, issued as part of a draft environmental impact statement, would sell almost four times the timber volume sold by the Forest Service in the entire state of California in 2013. It would ignore longstanding rules protecting old-growth trees and destroy habitat for roughly 60 percent of imperiled black-backed woodpeckers.

"It’s little more than an excuse to cut old trees in forests that would otherwise be protected," said Randi Spivak of the Center for Biological Diversity. "Decades of science have shown the importance of preserving burned areas for wildlife like black-backed woodpeckers and the function of these complex ecosystems. Throwing that away to make the timber industry happy is shortsighted.”

The forests in the Rim fire area continue to thrive: Hillsides are now covered with blooming flowers and plants, birds are feeding off of the dead trees, new conifers are sprouting, and deer and other wildlife thrive.

Read More | Center for Biological Diversity | See Also: pdfNew Report: Logging Would Impede Rim Fire's Benefits for Wildlife, Water, Forest | Lawsuit Launched to Protect Rare Black-backed Woodpeckers in California, Oregon, S. Dakota | New Study: Sierra Forest Fire Severity Is Not Increasing
Caltrans Willits Bypass Permit Suspended In a move that stunned but was welcomed by long-time opponents, the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) suspended the permit for the Caltrans Willits Bypass on Friday, June 20. ACE is the agency that regulates impacts on federally protected wetlands. This project has been highly contested, with Native American involvement and over 50 arrests last year.

“This appears to be the first time ACE has ever pulled a permit on an approved project under construction,” said Ellen Drell, co-founder of the Willits Environmental Center, one of the project’s opponents. ”We are surprised and elated that ACE has finally acted, although we have been pointing out the enormous problems with Caltrans’ plans for years."

Over 50 people were arrested last year in protests to stop Caltrans' construction and advocate for alternative plans. In addition to the issues of wetlands destruction, a long list of violations of the Migratory Bird Act, Clean Water Act, and numerous permit violations and other habitat threats, it has come to the attention of local Tribes that archaeological sites were buried with new fill without Tribal consultation, as required by law.

Read More | See Also: Ceremony to Protect Wetlands Brings Together Environmentalists, Indigenous People

Previous Coverage: Occupation of the Willits Bypass on Highway 101 | Action Camp to Defend Little Lake Valley Established
Reducing Beef Intake by One Pound Saves More Water Than Not Showering for Six Months California is experiencing a serious drought and the media is filled with recommendations about how to save water: Switch to dry landscaping; don't run water when you are shaving or brushing your teeth; install low­-flow shower­heads; and don't wash your car. All those ideas would help, but much less than people think.

According to a 2012 report by the Pacific Institute, only 4% of California's water is used by individuals. An astounding 93% of California's water goes to agriculture; and most of that 93% is misused or wasted. Humans drink less than one gallon of water per day. A cow drinks 23 gallons per day — and we have 5.5 million of them.

Low-flow showerheads help save much less water than people think. Most people shower once a day and use an average of 14 gallons of water. You could save more water by reducing your beef intake by one pound than by not showering for six months!

photoRead More | pdf"California's Water Footprint" report by the Pacific Institute (PDF)
iCal feed From the Calendar:
7:30PM Wednesday Sep 17 Years of Living Dangerously
1PM Sunday Sep 21 People's Climate March
7:30PM Wednesday Sep 24 Years of Living Dangerously
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People's Climate Train Leaves CA En Route to Historic Climate March in New York City Center for Biological Diversity
Monday Sep 15th 2:31 PM
Litigation Reins in Misguided Army Corps Program to Cut Trees From Levees Center for Biological Diversity
Saturday Sep 13th 9:04 PM
New Data Shows California Drift Gillnets Not Sustainable, Continue to Kill Marine Mammals Center for Biological Diversity
Saturday Sep 13th 9:01 PM
Plans for Monterey Bay Resort Deemed Deficient via Sierra Club, Ventana Chapter
Friday Sep 12th 5:55 PM
No on Prop. 1: Californians Deserve Sustainable Water Solutions Dan Bacher (1 comment)
Friday Sep 12th 2:02 PM
New Report: Offshore Fracking Threatens California's Ocean, Air, Seismic Safety Center for Biological Diversity
Thursday Sep 11th 12:56 PM
Ami Bera introduces bill to block federal funding for BDCP Dan Bacher (2 comments)
Wednesday Sep 10th 3:42 PM
Dam The Indians Anyway - War Dance at Shasta Dam Dan Bacher
Tuesday Sep 9th 6:58 PM
Salty Lady Hooks Sea Turtle While Fishing For Salmon Joanna Nasar
Tuesday Sep 9th 9:52 AM
Big Oil money defeated bill to ban drilling in marine protected area Dan Bacher (1 comment)
Monday Sep 8th 7:30 PM
Tree Vigil: Save Our Big Trees (1 comment)
Monday Sep 8th 12:31 PM
More Local News...
Lawsuit Seeks Public Records on Keystone XL's Impacts on Endangered Species Center for Biological Diversity
Saturday Sep 13th 8:52 PM
Urban Agriculture ~ U.S. Census of Agriculture 2017 khubaka, michael harris
Saturday Sep 13th 5:57 AM
20 Corals Protected Under Endangered Species Act Because of Global Warming Center for Biological Diversity
Wednesday Aug 27th 4:38 PM
Gene Drives Are The Latest Disaster On the GMO Front John Thielking (2 comments)
Wednesday Aug 27th 2:26 PM
Requiem for a Species Beeline
Tuesday Aug 26th 12:14 PM
Lawsuit Launched to Protect Endangered CA Birds From Large-scale Desert Solar Project Center for Biological Diversity
Friday Aug 22nd 10:54 PM
Obama Administration Stealthily OKs Expansion of Tar Sands Transport Through Minnesota Center for Biological Diversity
Friday Aug 22nd 10:47 PM
More Global News...
The Environmental Costs and Benefits of Fracking Stanford University
Saturday Sep 13th 8:19 PM
Radical Mycology Collective Speaks About Fungi and More! WTUL News and Views
Wednesday Aug 27th 7:41 AM
Chemtrails And Climate Geo-Engineering: The Shasta Decision Tomas DiFiore
Thursday Aug 14th 11:50 AM
Snake Valley Festival in Baker NV fights SNWA ‘Water Grab’ By Garrett Estrada
Saturday Jul 26th 6:55 AM
please save water Skweakee Phelan + Pamela D. Phelan
Friday Jul 18th 9:31 AM
SB 1371 The Methane Leakage Abatement Workforce Act Tomas DiFiore
Tuesday Jul 8th 2:12 AM
U.S. farmers making hay with alfalfa exports to China David Pierson
Sunday Jun 8th 11:06 PM
Open Newswire...
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