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Central Valley | Health, Housing, and Public Services

Stockton Small Business Week is poised for new opportunity, growth and development
by John S Kiernan
Thursday May 15th, 2014 12:10 AM
Wallet Hub Study is released during National Small Business Week showing Stockton, Modesto, Bakersfield and Fresno ranking very poorly. 2014 Stockton Small Business Week is poised to help address the different metrics are impacting the poorest ranking possible among 100 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. New innovative approaches to systemic challenges throughout the California Central Valley will begin to target a new way forward, healing what is hurting our communities are available. 365/24/7 a new paradigm for job creation, career advancement and community economic development requires a new approach.
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Continuing WalletHub’s theme of small business-related releases in honor of National Small Business Week (May 12-16), this study sought to identify the cities that are the most and least friendly to employees of small companies.

There is no shortage of commentary on the best and worst cities to start a small business, after all, and with such companies employing about 47% of the private workforce in this country, paying more than 40% of the private payroll, and creating more than 60% of the new jobs added over the past 20 years, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration, it bears asking what opportunities exist for the roughly 12.3% of people who are currently either unemployed or marginally attached to the labor force, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

More specifically, WalletHub’s used 10 different metrics – ranging from net small business job growth and industry variety to hours worked and average wages for new hires – to evaluate the state of small business in the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. We then ranked the cities based on their overall attractiveness for job seekers.