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U.S. | Police State and Prisons

The century-old tradition of a rotten judiciary system – Example Albert Woodfox
by Ardaga C. Widor
Monday Jan 13th, 2014 5:17 AM
Almost a century after the state of Massachusetts’ despiteful law
ridiculing, torture and assassination in the “case” against Sacco and
Vanzetti, today it is the state of Louisiana that has become the
vanguard of a rotten justice that stands for an outrageous shame.
A couple of days ago I received a “Take Action Now” e-mail from Amnesty International. Concerning the continuous effort of the state of Louisiana to keep the last of the Angola Three, Albert Woodfox, imprisoned. In isolation, that is.

AI invited us not only to sign a petition but also to write a letter to the Attorney General (of Louisiana) James “Buddy” Caldwell and to Albert himself.

No question I did it all.

I however feel that my letter to the Attorney General, if it ever makes it onto his table, will disappear quickly in a garbage can. Which doesn’t really make me happy. After all I feel that my point of view (from a foreign country) is important too. And shouldn’t go unnoticed by the US public.

Thus I publish it today (see below) with the help of the independent media in your country. And ask you kindly to do YOUR solidarity thing too!

Attorney General James "Buddy" Caldwell
Office of the Attorney General
P.O Box 94005
Baton Rouge, LA 70804
Email: executive [at] ag.state.la.us

Albert Woodfox
#72148
David Wade Correctional Center, N1A3
670 Bell Hill Rd.
Homer, LA 71040




Dear Attorney General Caldwell:

I am a worker in the field of education. In Brazil. And work mostly
with Indigenous people. When it comes to the United States I
frequently mention and use a tool created by a wise and just man: Dee
Brown’s book “Bury my heart at Wounded Knee”. (Citing from Wikipedia:
The book expresses a Native American perspective on the injustices and
betrayals committed by the US government. Brown describes Native
Americans' displacement through forced relocations and years of
warfare waged by the United States federal government. The
government's dealings are portrayed as a continuing effort to destroy
the culture, religion, and way of life of Native American peoples.)
When it comes to deeper research into the tradition of justice in the
USA I show movies. Like “Malcolm X”. Like “All power to the people”,
“Huey”, “The FBI’s war on Black America”… Or I play music from Billie
Holyday’s “Strange Fruits” to Joan Baez’ “The Ballad of Sacco &
Vanzetti”…
Or we speak of Vietnam. Or of the USA’s role in Brazil during the
military dictatorship, and Bunge’s and Monsanto’s roles TODAY. It’s
awful fertile and deep soil indeed, if one is up to understand how far
the genuine meaning of justice has been kept traditionally from the
judiciary system of the USA.

And almost a century after the state of Massachusetts’ despiteful law
ridiculing, torture and assassination in the “case” against Sacco and
Vanzetti, today it is the state of Louisiana that has become the
vanguard of a rotten justice that stands for an outrageous shame. We
conscious and human rights loving educators certainly are informing
our students on these topics.

So of you wish to prove us wrong (in the future) when we teach that
THERE IS NO JUSTICE in your system you must start to act according the
principles of real justice and human rights NOW.

The state of Louisiana must withdraw its appeal against the February
2013 ruling that overturned Albert Woodfox's conviction for murder so
that he can be freed. And the very same state must remove Albert
Woodfox immediately from isolation and end his inhumane treatment in
prison.

Ardaga C. Widor
Piatã, Bahia, Brazil