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California | Education & Student Activism

Black Agriculture ~ National Emancipation Day ~ Kwanzaa "First Fruits of the Harvest"
by khubaka, michael harris ( blackagriculture [at] yahoo.com )
Sunday Dec 16th, 2012 10:24 PM
This year's seven-day Kwanzaa celebrations highlight the current notion of National Emancipation Day.

Black Agriculture continues to take a critical look at the 150th Emancipation Proclamation and prepares to join the ceremony and listen closely to the keynote address by Reverend Amos C. Brown of the Third Baptist Church of San Francisco. When more of our "Faith Based Leaders" move towards celebrating the first day of Kwanzaa and join Rev. Brown focusing on the principle of Umoja, or unity, to strive and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race, the renaissance of Black Agriculture will manifest year round harvests throughout our community.
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Our "California Grown" 7 day holiday Kwanzaa, celebrates "the first fruits of the harvest." The blockbuster movies, "Lincoln" and "Django" open a closer look at exactly what is our place in history. The golden legacy of Black Agriculture in California remains an open secret best qualified to restore a people to historical greatness.

150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation Celebrations, ( 2012 - 2015 ) builds on the primary source documents available and a quest to locate salient missing documents of our story.

President Abraham Lincoln issued his Executive Order during the middle of the Civil War as a bold statement to all Americans that thoses enslaved in Southern states in rebellion could now consider themselves free and people of African ancestry would be allowed to join the Armed Services to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation. It effectively changed the purpose of the Civil War.

This year's seven-day Kwanzaa celebrations highlight the current notion of National Emancipation Day.

A critical look at the Emancipation Proclamation continues with a ceremony and keynote address by Reverend Amos C. Brown of the Third Baptist Church of San Francisco. On the first day of Kwanzaa, Rev. Brown focuses on the principle of Umoja, or unity, to strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.

The notion to strive for continues... and for a limited few... the notion of maintaining unity... is seen in a daily, living, social practice.

National Emancipation Day, January 1, 2013 will renew a national tradition for people of African ancestry... thanking GOD for moving a man with a Biblical name to begin an official legal journey towards freedom for all people throughout the United States of America with the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the US Constitution. 2013 will be an amazing year, a new beginning.