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Social Darwinism
by Ted Rudow III, MA (Tedr77 [at] aol.com)
Saturday Apr 14th, 2012 11:10 AM
Social Darwinism is a belief, popular in the late Victorian era in England, America, and elsewhere, which states that the strongest or fittest should survive and flourish in society, while the weak and unfit should be allowed to die.
The theory was chiefly expounded by Herbert Spencer, whose ethical philosophies always held an elitist view and received a boost from the application of Darwinian ideas such as adaptation and natural selection.
The concept of adaptation allowed him to claim that the rich and powerful were better adapted to the social and economic climate of the time, and the concept of natural selection allowed him to argue that it was natural, normal, and proper for the strong to thrive at the expense of the weak. After all, he claimed, that is exactly what goes on in nature every day.

"Wow, what a great leap forward for mankind (or what passes for it these days). Stand you ground partner, but lose your civilization".

Mike Caggiano

Ted Rudow III, MA