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WILL EGYPT WITNESS A SECOND REVOLUTION?
by ALADDIN ELAASAR
Sunday Jan 22nd, 2012 2:55 PM
Now, after the downfall of the Mubarak regime and the overthrow of his notorious State Security apparatus last year, the Egyptian have broken the fear barrier and feel that there is no turning back to the old dark days. But ,Will they surprise the world with EGYPTIAN REVOLUTION, PART II?
WILL EGYPT WITNESS A SECOND REVOLUTION?

BY ALADDIN ELAASAR

The first anniversary of the Egyptian revolution is on 1/25/2012. Egyptian society and the forces in Egypt are in a state of anticipation. World media has its cameras and correspondents in Cairo and major cities around the country. It has been a year since the eruption of the first Egyptian revolution that stunned the world and generated the most coverage in recent history. That revolution resulted into the end of the thirty years authoritarian, oppressive and corrupt rule of Mubarak, Egypt's Last Pharaoh, who ended up in jail along with his sons and major figures of his regime. Stories of unimaginable corruption, brutality and looting of the former regime have been surfacing ever since. Meanwhile, most Egyptians are angry and frustrated with the performance of the Military Council -comprised of more than a dozen of elderly generals- that has taken control.

Many Egyptians, political forces and revolutionaries accuse the Military Council of being accompliced and uncooperative in covering up on the remnants of the Mubarak regime and of not being serious in presenting real reform and trials to corrupt officials. Egyptian society has been enraged by the brutal suppression of peaceful demonstrations that followed the revolution, in addition to the killing, arresting and humiliating even female protesters. The Military Council is still controlling the state media, the political scene and engaged in backroom dealings with certain political forces. Many people in Egypt are accusing the the elderly Military Council as the Old Guard, or the counter revolution that is desperately trying to preserve the old order and guarantee the privileges and the special status of the military institution.The military institution in Egypt has been running the country since 1952. Several military figures have ruled Egypt ever since starting with General Naguib, Nasser, Sadat, Mubarak and Marshal Tantawy. In Egypt's modern history the military have dominated the the political scene, served as presidents, prime minsters, ministers in many cabinet positions, governors, party elites, heads of the security services, ambassadors, heads of many companies, and even ministers of culture and the media- in a true Orwellian fashion.

The military institution in Egypt consumes more than 25% of the government expenditure, owns about 30% of the national economy, and has been receiving a hefty military aid package from the USA for almost three decades in billions. Egyptians do have a strong faith and respect for their armed forces, but they are tired of the militarization of society and are gasping for a civil state where human rights, rights of minorities, and accountability and transparency are guaranteed. They do not want another Pharaoh-like president coming from the military institution.

Egyptians have been asked to commemorate that special occasion by taking to the streets on that day wearing black mourning the death of hundreds of the martyrs of the revolution.Many political forces refuse to call it a celebration as the revolution has not been complete and their demands have not been met, they say.Demonstrators have already started to pour into Tahrir Square and activists have asked them not to leave, call for the immediate transition of power from the Military Council to a civilian council or even an interim care taker.They accuse the Military Council of manipulating the political scene and even orchestrating violent suppression of demonstrators and activists and even arresting them and trying them before military tribunals. many Western governments and human rights organizations have expressed their dismay with the way the Military Council has performed since last year's revolution. Now, after the downfall of the Mubarak regime and the overthrow of his notorious State Security apparatus last year, the Egyptian have broken the fear barrier and feel that there is no turning back to the old dark days. But ,Will they surprise the world with EGYPTIAN REVOLUTION, PART II?

Award-winning author and lecturer Aladdin Elaasar is author of The Last Pharaoh: Mubarak and the Uncertain Future of Egypt in the Obama Age and professor of Arabic Language and Mideast Area Studies. Born, raised and educated in Egypt and the United States, Elaasar is an expert on Egypt and the Arab World. He has been a frequent commentator on the Middle East on American TV and Radio networks.Email him at omaraladin [at] aol.com

The Last Pharaoh: Mubarak and the Uncertain Future of Egypt in the Obama Age
This is the first and most anticipated documentary about the Egyptian revolution and Arab Revolt.