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The Criminal Cover-up Of Pam Marrone's Agraquest Operation
by Sandi Trend, Mother of David Bell
Monday Feb 9th, 2009 1:49 PM
The Davis biotech company Agraquest which was owned by Pam Marrone has been engaged in a criminal conspiracy to cover-up it's illegal use of fungus and bacteria without informing California and US oversight agencies being made aware of their use. As a result biotech worker David Bell and other workers have been subject to contamination and sickness from these substances. The Davis community health and safety was also put in jeopardy when the company instructed Bell and other workers to dump these substances on the grounds.
marron__pam_at_lab.jpg
FOR THE FIRST TIME, IN THE NEARLY 10 YEAR STRUGGLE OF DAVID BELL, IT CAN BE PROVEN WHAT THE BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, AGRAQUEST IS AND HAS BEEN CONCEALING

By AQ finally making the “public statement” about David Bell and his workplace exposure in the October 2008 issue of the California Aggie, “Local biotech employee says health affected by work”, it can now be proven what AQ has been withholding and concealing.

The California Aggie’s article refers to AQ’s product. Serenade as well as Histoplasma:

“A written statement from AgraQuest said that the Bacillus subtilis strain is the only active ingredient in AgraQuest's product Serenade, a project Bell was working on. "It has been tested in accordance with EPA and EU guidelines for microbial pesticides and poses no significant risk to handlers or the environment used according to label instructions," the report says.”

Serenade’s active ingredient is the bacterium, Bacillus subtilis strain, QST 713 (formerly QRD 713), which was discovered by AQ scientist, Sherry Heins in a peach orchard in Fresno, California.

•All of the AQ products on the market which contain Bacillus subtilis ARE the strain QST 713.

What was not disclosed in the written statement from AQ is that David was not only exposed to AQ’s product Serenade, Bacillus Subtilis Strain QST 713, but numerous strains of bacteria and fungi., specifically bacillus subtilis strain - AQ 153, which was also being tested at AQ.


•The Bacillus subtilis strain AQ 153 was discovered by George Vandemark (not with AQ) and was deposited with the American Type Culture Collection as ATCC 55614 by Agritope in Oregon.

•Bacillus subtilis AQ 153 is a different strain of bacillus subtilis than the strain of Bacillus Subtilis used by AQ in their Serenade product, (QST 713).

The application that Agraquest founder and CEO, Pam Marrone filed with the United States Patent Office for the registration of United States Patent 6,004,774 on 11/25/1998 (listing the four AQ scientists as inventors) lists Bacillus Subtilis strain AQ153 [ATCC 55614] (ACTIVE INGREDIENT) is the only bacillus subtilis strain listed. This is the same patent which says, "to treat human fungal diseases", "disseminated disease" and "for example, Aspergillus sp, Histoplasma sp, and Tinea sp."

Further, only 4 days after David first sought emergency medical care all four scientists from AQ started signing over their interest rights to U.S. Patent 6,004,774.

Agraquest does not make these well documented facts public.

[Histoplasma was detected in David’s blood serum as well as he tested HIGH POITIVE in test for IgG Anitiodies to Aspergillus (showing levels of exposure and antibiodies his body had built up as a defense against it)]

It should be noted; histoplasma IS NOT endemic to the valley in which David lived or worked and in fact is found in dry and humid climates.

The Fungus and Bacteria of Deregulation and Biotech Worker David Bell
http://www.workersmemorialday.org/documents/fungus.htm


http://biotechawareness.com/

BIO-TECHNOLOGY AWARENESS
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Friday, 05 December 2008 20:50 administrator



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In the October 30, 2008 - California Aggie article; "Local biotech employee says health affected by work" - "Officials say no threat to public health".

The first sentence, "A presentation hosted by Davis Students for Nader two weeks ago raised question about the possibility of harmful microbes in local soil, but public health officials say the claims are unfounded."

Included in this article is a statement by Jeff Pinnow (surpervising hazardous material specialist for Yolo County Environmental Health):

"The complaints [regarding Agraquest and work related exposure] did not come into Yolo County until 2007" and "David Bell's mother, Sandi Trend, took it to the Yolo County District Attorneys Office and was mainly approaching it from the standpoint of worker's compensation issues".

The statement from Jeff Pinnow, "did not come into Yolo County until 2007" is completely false and misleading. Yolo County became aware of David Bell’s occupational exposure in 2004 when the National Institue of Occupational Safety and Health sent a letter (on or around 6/30/2004) to Cal/OSHA and well as to The Yolo County Health Department [concerning David Bell’s exposure to Histoplasa at Agraquest].

As is evidenced by the 8/2/2004 response letter from Bette G. Hinton, Officer/Director of the Yolo County Health Department clearly shows Yolo County was 100% aware of David’s work related exposure in 2004 and not 2007 as Jeff Pinnow claimed.

Over a month had passed before Bette G. Hinton addressed the issues brought before her. Ms. Hinton said in an 8/2/2004 response letter that the 2nd AQ location at 1530 Drew Avenue in Davis, Ca had been inspected by Cal/OSHA and stated, "with findings that do not suggest "ongoing exposure" [EMPHASIS ADDED] to Histoplasma organism".

Ms. Hinton was immediately notified that where David had gotten sick was at the 1st AQ location at 1105 Kennedy Place in Davis, Ca. and not the Drew Avenue location where Cal/OSHA inspected. There was never a reply from Ms. Hinton.

To date there has never been an inspection of the 1105 Kennedy Place building nor the grounds surrounding the building [where AQ "dumped" liquid substances down the so-called "drain", that was merely a hollowing out in the concrete that led directly onto the ground] per requests from several of the City of Davis residents.

Additionally, Jeff Pinnow's statement In the Cal Aggie article, "mainly approaching it from the standpoint of worker's compensation issues" is again completely false and misleading.

Ms. Trend presented Detective Stroski of the Yolo County District Attorney's office the facts per Detective Stroski's request.

Detective Stroski was advised and given written documentation of Several mandated Federal and state laws that were violated by AQ concerning; adverse health effects (must be reported with respect to pesticides, insecticides, fungicides etc) per:

California Department of Pesticide Regulations:

•Division 6. Pesticides and Pest Control Operations; Chapter 2. Pesticides; Subchapter 1. Pesticide Registration; Article 6. Adverse Effects Disclosure

•Chapter IX; REGULATORY ACTIONS AFTER THE PRODUCT IS REGISTERED;

•B. RENEWAL OF PRODUCT REGISTRATION
•F. ADVERSE EFFECTS DISCLOSURE
•G. REEVALUATIONS
•H. RISK ASSESSMENTS

Federal Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA)

•7 U.S.C. §136 et seq. (1996); Summary of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act

On April 3, 1998 there was the, "1998 PESTICIDE REGISTRATION NOTICE 98-3; NOTICE TO MANUFACTURERS, FORMULATORS, PRODUCERS, DISTRIBUTORS AND REGISTRANTS OF PESTICIDE PRODUCTS", which in part says:

"which requires pesticide registrants to report information concerning unreasonable adverse effects of their products to EPA (62 FR 49370). The purpose of the rule is to clarify what information to submit, how and when to submit it, as well as which failures to report information, or delays in reporting, will be regarded by EPA as violations of FIFRA section 6(a)(2), actionable under FIFRA sections 12(a)(2)(B)(ii) and 12(a)(2)(N)."

•III. AGGREGATE REPORTING The regulations establish different requirements for reporting time frames and for content of incident reports depending on the defined severity categories (see Section VIII. Exposure Types and Severity Categories). (numerous others are included in this law)


AGRAQUEST FURTHER VIOLATED (TO NAME A FEW BUT NOT LIMITED TO):

* None reporting of work related injury/illness per Federal and state of California Occupational Safety and Health laws:

* California Code of Regulations: Title 8 Section 342; "Immediate reporting of any serious injury, illness, or death of an employee at the workplace"

* none compliance of Right-To-Know of Hazards in the Workplace

* Insurance Code Section 11760], Labor Code 5401 Reg 101119; "Claim Form provided to employee within one day of knowledge of injury"

* Labor Code 3602; "Liability exists for any injury sustained by an employee “arising out of and in the course of employment”

* Labor Code 4600; "Medical Treatment; employee is entitled to treatment that is “reasonably required to cure or relieve from the effects of the injury”

* Labor Code 4650; "Injury Causes Temporary Disability-Payment to Begin"

Further on Detective Stroski, Detective Stroski, after reviewing the material Ms. Trend had given him concerning Agraquest and the compelling evidence to her son, David’s sudden and ongoing declining health as the result of working for the company, had contacted the California Department of Insurance who then contacted the Sacramento County District Attorneys Office. No action was taken by any of the three agencies in relation to upholding Federal and state laws violated by AQ. In fact, when Detective Stroski was approached months later at the California Department of Insurance, and questioned, "why the Yolo County District Attorneys Office was not prosecuting AQ" he was told, "we don't have the funding"

AQ's 1530 Drew Avenue location was inspected and AQ was cited and fined by Cal/OSHA for "several illegal fume-hoods" (however, under oath Denise Manker of AQ said there was only one fume hood.) This was the only known citation that AQ had received until the October 30, 2008 - California Aggie article in which is stated:

"Yolo County Environmental Health inspections found two minor violations in 2003 and 2006"

We do regulate the current facility on Drew Avenue for hazardous waste," Pinnow said, "I took a report of previous inspections. they basically had a couple of violations in the hazardous waste program - nothing that I haven't seen at least at a couple other facilities."

"The violations included an instance of not labeling hazardous waste containers and failing to submit a waste disposal form (though the form was on file at the office). Other than that Agraquest has followed safety standards, Pinnow said."

"Allegations of dumping stuff is of one person. That's the only allegation I have heard, he said".

It should be noted that hazardous waste/toxic substances had been removed from AQ's 1105 Kennedy Place location & 1530 Drew Ave., as well as from the CEO and founder, Pam Marrone's other start-up company, NovoNordisk - ENTOTECH in Davis, Ca. (Entotech was the exact same type of biotechnology research and development company as AQ). Hazardous waste/toxic substances removed are as follows:

* ALKALINE SOLUTION (PH>= W/O METALS
* ARSENIC
* BIOLOGICAL WASTE (FOOD PROCESSING, ETC.)
* BLANK/UNKNOWN
* CADMIUM
* CORROSIVES
* CYANIDES (SOLUBLE CYANIDE SALTS), NOT
* IGNITABLE
* LABORATORY WASTE
* LABORATORY WASTE CHEMICALS
* LEAD
* LIQUIDS W PH<=2
* LIQUIDS WITH MERCURY>= 20 MG/L
* MERCURY
* NON-HALOGENATED SOLVENTS
* OFF-SPEC, AGED, OR SURPLUS INORGANICS
* OTHER EMPTY CONTAINERS>= 30 GALLONS
* OTHER INORGANIC SOLID WASTE
* PHOTOCHEMICALS/PHOTOPROCESSING WASTE
* SILVER
* SURPLUS INORGANICS
* UNSPECIFIED OIL-CONTAINING WASTE
* UNSPECIFIED SOLVENT MIXTURE

It is quite shocking that officials within Yolo County and the City of Davis have such a lack of concern with regard to health and safety in and from a biological laboratory who "collects microbes from soils and plants all over the world, tests their ability to combat plant diseases and pests, and makes pesticides out of the best candidates." Sacramento Business Journal, TITLE: AgraQuest gets another pact (November 24, 2000)

Additionally contained within the Cal Aggie article were the warnings from both Dina Padilla, 2009 Congressional candidate and Mr. Haney, environmental health researcher - to the residents of Davis.

Padilla:

"Your city, your college, your residents - you have a danger in your neighborhood", "We don't know how far this danger exists in the water, in the food. We need to contact the city council, media and Congress people."

Haney:

"It's important that you pay attention to what's going on in Davis", The problem is that soil was being brought across cuntry and county lines without documentation. That's what I'm worried about in Davis. When you have a mutated crop you can have a disease that becomes immediate, midterm or one that takes 20 to 30 years to develop, such as cancer."


Information concerning Agraquest's workplace involvement with the fungus, Histoplasma being found in David Bell's blood serum in 2003 by the Arizona Mayo Clinic, and Agraquest's products approved by the EPA. was additionally sent to the U.S. federal regulatory agency, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in late 2003 or early 2004 As is documented in e-mails to and from the EPA, (Shanaz Baccus) the end result was "no action" was taken against Agraquest per EPA's responsibilities to protect human health and the environment.

The EPA merely referred the matter over to Daniel Sudakin, Assistant Professor of Oregon State University - Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology. Sudakin said, “There is nothing I can do”.

When the EPA was contacted concerning Sudakin’s, “nothing I can do” response the EPA reply was, “Did you try CDC and OSHA? OSHA covers manufacturing regulations”. “As far as I know histoplasmosis is not associated with any active ingredient registered as a microbial pesticide for Agraquest.”

The above statement from the EPA, “As far as I know histoplasmosis is not associated with any active ingredient registered as a microbial pesticide for Agraquest.” in itself could be taken as the responsibility of the EPA lies solely on the active ingredient registered and this would infer that EPA has no further responsibilies to any adverse effects to human health and the environment. However, the is not the EPA’s position. As is evidenced in their own statement, “Before a pesticide can be marketed and used in the United States, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) requires that EPA evaluate the proposed pesticide to assure that its use will not pose unreasonable risks of harm to human health and the environment. This regulation involves an extensive review of health and safety information.”

With respect to the EPA and the statement in the Cal Aggie article, “ “A written statement from AgraQuest said that the Bacillus subtilis strain is the only active ingredient in AgraQuest's product Serenade, a project Bell was working on. "It has been tested in accordance with EPA and EU guidelines for microbial pesticides and poses no significant risk to handlers or the environment used according to label instructions," the report says.”

The EMPHASIS in the above statement, “the Bacillus subtilis strain is the only active ingredient in AgraQuest's product Serenade, a project Bell was working on “ is quite relevant.

The submissions of April 28, 1999 and June 19, 1999 by Agraquest to the EPA was the Serenade, [QST 713] Technical wettable powder spoke of in the Cal Aggie Article. David had transferred this wettable powder from LARGE drums into 24 pound bags for shipment. David was told "it was safe" and didn't wear a respirator. However, The EPA themselves only allowed a “conditional time-limited registration” instead of a full registration of Agraquest’s submission of QST Technical (QST 713) in 2000,. The reasons listed::

The submitted manufacturing processed did not have sufficient quality control fermentation batches

Data for the 12 month storage stability of the end-use product has not been submitted.

•Additional data described in the December 12, 1999 review and March 8 2000 letter are required to upgrade submitted process, MRID# 44519-04 to acceptable. This includes:

•1) A formal submission that clearly describes new quality control steps taken to assure the consistent CFU/g values and limit microbial impurities in the Technical Powder.

•2) A 5 batch analysis of Technical Powder produced from cell cultures with latest QC.

•3) Raw data for the above mentioned 5 batch analyses.

Ecological Effects Data Required

•A 21 day Freshwater Aquatic Invertebrate Study must be performed. Attenuated and filter sterilized controls should be used in the test. Test lab should attempt to determine cause of death and whether pathogenicity involved.

•[Shrimp] Required due to report of disease in terrestrial amphipod crustacean associated with B. subtilis infection. Protocol must be submitted before initiating study.

•QST Technical was shown to cause mortality to parasitic Hymenoptera. MRID 44619-14 is graded supplemental. Potential pathogenicity was not investigated.

•[HONEY BEE] All test concentrations showed treatment related mortality. MRID 4456519-17 is supplemental due to the short test duration and the lack of a determination as to whether mortality was due to toxicity only or whether pathogenicity contributed.






by M J Rog
Monday Feb 9th, 2009 11:27 PM
It is sad and pathetic that you give this bogus story a forum. Don't give a Munchausen family the attention they crave.
by Dina Padilla
(dinajpadilla [at] gmail.com) Tuesday Feb 10th, 2009 12:02 PM
Just like people who portend to be scientists, there are those who portend to be psychiatrists.
Anybody who dares to speak out about corporate malfeaseance is always portayed as somebody with a mental disease, while it is clearly those who do harm for profit, ARE the ones who are mentally ill.
by Dina Padilla
Tuesday Feb 10th, 2009 4:39 PM
Sandi Trend, mother of David Bell DID NOT cause her son's injury! His employer Agraquest DID! So the poor intrepretation of Munchhausen's by proxy syndrome DOES not apply to Sandi Trend. IF anything she deserves a medal for trying to keep her son alive, which hasn't been the case by his employer or the state of California.
And the state of California via the worker's compensation system (the biggest joke of all, for workers to get their benefits because the state is pro-employer and anti-worker, millions of cases to prove it), is just as culpable for not going after the employer and insurer for his medical benefits to get better to which is owed to all workers by the Constitution of the state and United States. What does the state have to hide by not following the laws of the state in protecting its own workers? Will that stop money going to legislators and bond money to the state?
There are many in both state and federal government who allow corporations to control all workers rights which are little to none, exposing workers to the worst of all unhealthy and unsafe working conditions including exposure to molds, fungi and bacteria. The salmonella outbreak in our food sources are living proof.
So is David!
by Sandi Trend
Tuesday Feb 10th, 2009 10:42 PM
Reply to M J Rog; AKA Pam Marrone's husband, Michael (Mick) J. Rogers

Sir, you have again used the term " Munchausen" in reference to David Bell, as you also did in your comments to the Sacramento News & Review article, Blood, Phlegm and Tears written by Seth Sandronsi and in The People's Vanguard of Davis, written by Doug Paul Davis. If I am incorrect in this presumption I sincerely apologize.

I can assure you, given the fact that David Bell has been so sick due to the occupationally acquired illness and diseases from the fungus and bacteria exposure from his employment at Agraquest, IF David had Manchausen Syndrome it would have been a welcome event.

In your post/comment you use the term, "Munchausen by proxy" indicating his family misleads others into thinking that he has medical problems by lying and reporting fictitious episodes. You are accusing David's family of exaggerating, fabricating, inducing symptoms, including misleading Doctors, with the purpose of being able to deceive individuals considered to be more important. Although this is a very clever tactic on your part, this is a far stretch from the actual truth.

Your accusing David Bell of having Munchausens is misleading and liableous as David Bell has never been diagnosed with this syndrome nor is his family committing "Munchausen by proxy". There is a LONG paper trail of documented medical and scientific evidence to support my position as to Agraquest being to blame for David's illnesses. Furthermore, all the physicians who have treated David and the surgeons who have operated on him should be charged with medical malpractice IF in fact your diagnosis of Munchausens were correct, which it is not.

David didn't take the Assistant Researcher position at Agraquest in 1998 with the intention of destroying his health and life. He was excited that he was in on the cutting edge of biotechnology that was going to make this world a better place for all, and as Pam said, "this has never been done before".

At this point in David's life he should be a happy and a very successful "well" man of 42 years of age instead of the 10 years of infections, 4 major sinus surgeries (and numerous in-office ENT procedures), 3 years (every 28 days) of being hooked up to an IV Pump in a hospital.... just to mention a few that he has had to endure as a result of his employment at Agraquest.

I invite you to view the 60 page list of medical charges and payments for David Bell (over $333,000 as of end 2005 ONLY ) as yet another result of employment at Pam Marrone's Agraquest Research and Development biotechnology company that searches the world for fungus and bacteria for product candidates to be used on our food crops and insect control. (http://www.biotechawareness.com/images/david_billings_paid.pdf) [ this pdf file is 25.5 MB and will be slow to load and to view, please rotate the viewer window ]

Although at last count, Agraquest had over 25,000 microorganisms in their culture collection it is unknown how many of these or other microorganisms found are unidentifiable. Agraquest and/or it’s representatives have made public where they search for these microorganisms; in soil, plants, plant roots, lichen, leaves and/or it’s litter, mulch and other decaying organic matter, fruit, bird feathers, dead insects, lake beds, forests, dunes and ocean caves, animals from terrestrial sources, marine sources (sponges, sea urchins, etc.) insects of all kinds,  in rain forests, jungles, dry creek beds, orchards, farm fields, and gardens.  This is only what has been published.  This information was obtained through searching articles and interviews by or about Agraquest. “Excerpts” from these references can be viewed at http://www.biotechawareness.com/images/images/---agraquest_interview-articles_excerpts.pdf

Although the actual fungus and bacteria that Agraquest DEVELOPS for their patents and products have, as of this date not shown positive in David Bell, the fungus and bacteria that have tested positive in David are the DISEASES OF PLANTS AND INSECTS BEING TESTED AT AGRAQUEST. If you wish to see the Agraquest connections to these fungus and bacteria, please see: http://www.biotechawareness.com/index~option~com_content~view~article~id~148:path-fun-aq-connections~catid~41:david-bell-former-employee-of-agraquest~Itemid~59.php

These plant and insect "diseases" also cause disease in humans. Therefore, there can be no question as to Agraquest's involvement in David's continual and progressive declining health. David had NEVER been sick other than the normal colds etc. before he went to work at Agraquest. He did have seasonal allergies and because of a car accident at the age of 6 he had hernia surgery.

Nine (9) of the Nineteen (19) bacteria and fungus that have tested positive in David, either in his blood and/or nose or sputum cultures and/or antibody IgG levels can be traced to the U.S. Patent Application [U. S. Patent 6,004,774] from and by "first named inventor", Pamela Gail Marrone alone. (I reiterate, 4 days after David Bell first sought emergency medical care [1/18/1999] with bloody pus draining from his nose and the left half of his face and teeth were numb all four of the Agraquest scientists started signing away their interest rights on this patent [from 1/22/1999 through 1/26/1999])

THE NINE BACTERIA AND FUNGUS [U.S PATENT 6,004,774] TESTING POSITIVE IN DAVID ARE:

* HISTOPLASMA source; blood serum (*found in soil)
* PENICILLIUM source: sputum culture and IgG level HIGH POSITIVE (*found in soil & decaying vegetation)
* PSEUDOMONAS sources: numerous nose and/or sputum cultures (*found in soil, *plant disease, *found in Mosquito Midgut [David worked with mosquito's on his Laginex project]
* ALTERNARIA source; IgG level POSITIVE (*plant disease)
* ASPERGILLUS source; IgG level POSITIVE (*plant disease)
* BOTRYTIS source; IgG level positive (*plant disease)
* FUSARIUM source: IgG HIGH POSITIVE (*plant disease, *plant rot pathogen)
* RHIZOPUS source; IgG level POSITIVE (*found in soil, decaying fruit and vegetables, *plant disease
* STEMPHYLIUM source; IgG level POSITIVE (*found in soil and plant vegetation, *plant disease, *Commonly considered a contaminant

•THE OTHER 10 BACTERIA AND FUNGUS WHICH HAVE ALSO TESTED POSITIVE IN DAVID CAN ALL BE TRACED TO:

Agraquest’s own admission of them being in the workplace environment in the workers' compensation phase:

* ACREMONIUM source: sputum culture (*found in soil *pathogen of soil, *plant disease)
* PENICILLIUM source: sputum culture and IgG level HIGH POSITIVE (*found in soil & decaying vegetation)
* CURVULARIA source: nose culture (*pathogen of soil and plant disease)
* ALTERNARIA source: *IgG POSITIVE (*plant disease)

•Agraquest’s United States patent filings (not including International patents:

* ALTERNARIA source: *IgG POSITIVE (*plant disease)
* ASPERGILLUS source; IgG level POSITIVE" (*plant disease)
* BOTRYTIS source IgG Positive (*plant disease)
* CLADOSPORIUM source: IgG HIGH POSITIVE (*plant disease)
* FUSARIUM (plant disease, *plant rot pathogen)

•Agraquest’s products and/or Agraquest’s scientists being listed as inventors” on U.S. patents assigned to other companies:

* STAPHLOCOCCUS sources: numerous nose and/or sputum cultures (*found in mosquito midgut, [*David worked with mosquito's on his Laginex project ]
* ALTERNARIA source: *IgG POSITIVE (*plant disease)
* ASPERGILLUS source; IgG level POSITIVE (*plant disease)
* BOTRYTIS source IgG Positive (*plant disease)
* CLADOSPORIUM source: IgG HIGH POSITIVE (*plant disease)
* FUSARIUM source: IgG HIGH POSITIVE (plant disease, *plant rot pathogen)
* HELMINTHOSPORIUM source: IgG HIGH POSITIVE (*plant disease)
* MUCOR source: IgG POSITIVE (*found in soil, plants, decaying fruit and vegetables, *Common laboratory contaminant
* RHIZOPUS source: IgG POSITIVE (*found in soil, decaying fruit and vegetables, *plant disease
* STEMPHYLIUM source: IgG POSITIVE (*found in soil and plant vegetation, plant Disease, *Commonly considered a contaminant
(continued below)


Worked with at Agraquest Laboratory:

* STAPHLOCOCCUS sources: numerous nose and/or sputum cultures (*found in mosquito midgut, [David worked with mosquito's on his Laginex project], *Studied by Agraquest Scientist, Jimmy Orjala (1999) @ 1105 Kennedy Place-Davis, CA.)

***Additionally testing POSITIVE in David Bell was RARE MUCUS in an URINALYSIS test.****

THERE IS MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC DOCUMENTATION CONCERNING THE EFFECTS THE ABOVE BACTERIA AND FUNGUS, WHICH HAVE TESTED POSITIVE IN DAVID BELL, HAVE CONCERNING HUMAN HEALTH. SOME OF THEM INCLUDE THOSE LISTED BELOW [References following]:

ACINETOBACTER (bacteria):
*Acute myelogenous leukemia   32
*Arm abscess   32
*Bacteremia   32
*Blood-stream infections 5
*Brain abscess   32
*Bronchiectasis   32
*Cellulitis   32
*Central nervous system infections 5
*Chest wall erosion   32 
*Cholestasis   32
*Chronic bronchitis   32
*Cutaneous abscess   32
*Diverticulitis   32
*Empyema   32
*Enterocutancous fistula   32
*Immunosuppression   32  √  
*Mediaslinitis   32
*Mpyema   32
*Pelvic abscess   32
*Pelvic infection   32
*Pericardial    32
*Periodontal disease   32
*Pleural  effusions   32
*Pleural lesion    32
*Pneumonectomy for tuberculosis and aspergilloma   32
*Pneumonia   5, 32
*Pulmonary abscess   32
*Resection malignant gastric polyp   32
*Rheumatoid arthritis   32
*Skin and wound infections 5 √
*Spinal and  muscle abscesses   32
*Submaxillary gland   32
*Thoracic wall abscess   32
*Thumb abscess   32
*Urinary tract infection 5
*Vasculitis   32

ACREMONIUM [fungi]
*Acute lymphoblastic leukemia; neutropenia 3
*Addison’s disease 3 
*Allergies 7 √  
*Asthma 7   √
*Chronic granulocytic leukemia;    neutropenia 3 
*Chronic granulomatous disease 3 √
*Disseminated Acremonium strictum infection 3 
*Disseminated infection of various  organs, including the brain 3
*Dura mater prosthesis 3
*Endocarditis 12
*Endophthalmitis 12 
*Gastrointestinal colonization 3 √
*Granulocytic  sarcoma;  neutropenia 3
*Hay fever 7  √
*Hypersensitivity pneumonitis 3, 7
*Keratitis 12
*Landry-Guillain-Barre´ syndrome 3
*Meningitis 12
*Multiple hypodense lesions in the  spleen 3
*Onychomycosis 3, 12
*Osteomyelitis 12
*Peritonitis 12
*Severe combined immunodeficiency disease 3 √  [David was diagnosed with CVID in 2003 & began 3 years of IV Immunoglobulin infusions]
*white piedra 3

CURVULARIA [fungi]
*Acute myelogenous leukemia   32
*Alcoholism
*Allergic Bronchopulmonary - Mycoses 10, 16
*Allergic fungal sinusitis 7, 16 √
*Allergic rhinitis 10   √
*Allergies 7,30  √
*Arm abscess   32
*Asthma 7, 30
*Asthmatic airway injury 30
*Bacteremia   32
*Brain abscess   28, 32
*Bronchiectasis
*Cellulitis   32
*Cerebral abscess 7, 16
*Cerebritis 16
*Chest wall erosion   32 
*Cholestasis   32
*Chronic bronchitis  32
*Cutaneous abscess   32
*Dermatitis  30
*Diarrhea 30
*Disseminated infections 7, 16
*Diverticulitis
*Empyema   32
*Endocarditis 16, 28
*Enterocutancous fistula   32
*Fatigue 30  √
*Flu symptoms 30  √
*Fungal ball production (sinuses) 10, 30    √
*general malaise (tiredness)  30  √
*hair loss 30  √
*Hay fever 7  √
*Hypersensitive  diseases 30
*immuno suppression 30, 32  √
*infections may develop in patients with intact immune systems 16 √
*interference with blood cell formation
*Keratitis 16, 28
*lesions of the Gastrointestinal tract 30
*lesions of the skin 30
*liver cancer 30
*Mediaslinitis   32
*mpyema   32
*mycetoma 16
*Mycotoxins are believed to result in headaches 30  √
*ocular Keratitis 7
*Onychomycosis 7, 16, 28
*opportunistic infections of the cornea 7
*opportunistic infections of the sinuses 7 √
*Pelvic abscess   32
*Pelvic infection   32
*Pericardial    32
*Periodontal disease
*phaeohyphomycosis 16 √
~Dark lesion on the septum is a  common presentation;  sinusitis √ is associated with  allergic rhinitis, √ polyps √ and/or  some form of immunosuppression (immunodeficiency) √  [David was diagnosed with CVD in 2003 & began 3 years of IV Immunoglobulin infusions]
*phaeohyphomycosis *Fatal Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis   25: 
*pleural  effusions   32
*Pleural lesion    32
*pneumonectomy for tuberculosis and aspergilloma   32
*Pneumonia 7, 16, 32  
*psychological depression 30
*Pulmonary abscess   32
*resection malignant gastric polyp   32
*Rheumatoid arthritis,
*Sinonasal mycetoma  29
*skin infections 28
*skin rashes 30 √
*sore throats 30 √
*spinal and  muscle abscesses   32
*Submaxillary gland   32
*Thoracic wall abscess   32
*Thumb abscess   32
*Vasculitis   32

HISTOPLASMA (HISTOPLASMA CAPSULATEUM) (fungi)
*Acute benign pulmonary infection 17
*Causes histoplasmosis √
*Chronic lung disease 4 √
*Chronic pulmonary infection 17
*Commonly involves the bones and skin 17 √
*Disseminated histoplasmosis is fatal if untreated, but death can also occur in some patients even when medical treatment is received 4
*Disseminated histoplasmosis, which involves spreading of the fungus to other organs outside the lungs 4
*Fatal disseminated disease 17
*Healthy individuals are affected 17 √
*Hypersensitivity to H. capsulatum  4 √
*Impaired vision and even blindness 4
*May involve the thyroid glands 17
*Reticuloendothelial system (RES) is most frequently involved (The fungus resides intracellularly in RES cells)  17

by Sandi Trend
Tuesday Feb 10th, 2009 10:51 PM
PENICILLIUM (fungi)
*Allergic Asthma 10 √
*Allergic rhinitis 10 √
*Bone involvement 11 √
*Carcinogenic 10, 11
*Endocarditis 11
*Endophtalmitis 11 
*External ear infectons 7  √
*Eypersensitivity pneumonitis 10
*Immunosupression (immunodeficiency) 10  √ [ David was diagnosed with CVID in 2003 & began 3 years of IV Immunoglobulin infusions]
*Keratitis  7, 11
*Liver involvement 11 √ 
*Lymphatic system involvement 11 √  
*Mutagenic 10
*Necrotizing esophagitis 11
*Neurotoxic 10, 11
*Otomycosis 11
*Peritonitis 11
*Pneumonia 11
*Respiratory infections 7 √  
*Spleen involvement 11 √
*Teratongenic effects 10
*Urinary tract infections 7, 11

PSEUDOMONAS [bacteria]
*Adheres-epithelial cells - upper respiratory tract 23 √
*Bacteremia 23
*Blood stream invasion 23
*Bone and joint infections 23
*Brain abscesses 23
*Central nervous system 23
*Chronic lung infections 23
*Dermatitis 23 √
*Disrupts the respiratory epithelium 23 √
*Emerging opportunistic pathogen 23
*Endocarditis 23 
*Exerts a pro-inflammatory effect  23  √
*Eye infections 23
*Gastrointestinal infections 23 √
*Impairs the normal function of human nasal cilia 23 √
*Invades inner ear 23
*Invades paranasal sinus 23 √
*Meningitis 23
*Osteochondritis 23
*Pneumonia 23 
*Respiratory system infections 23
*Septicemia 23 
*Skin infection 23 
*Soft tissue infections 23 √
*Systemic infections 23
*Urinary tract infections 23

STAPH [bacteria]
*Bacteremia 24
*Boils 24
*Carbuncles 24
*Cellulitis 24
*Diarrhea 24 √
*Emesis 24
*Endocarditis 24
*Folliculitis 24 √
*Food poisoning 24
*Impetigo 24
*Osteomyelitis 24
*Osteomylitis 24
*Pneumonia 24
*Scaled skin syndrome 24
*Sinusitis 24 √
*Toxic shock syndrome or TSS 24
*Urinary tract infection 24
*Wound infections 24 √

ALTERNARIA [fungi]
*Allergic Asthma 10 √
*Allergies 7 √
*Asthma 7 √
*Colonizes the paranasal sinus  13
*Fungal ball production (sinuses) 10 √
*Hay fever 7 √
*Hypersensitivity pneumonitiss 7
*Hypertrophic sinusitis - chronic 13 √
*Invasive disease 13
*Keratitis 13
*Nasal and subcutaneous lesions  7  √
*Onychomycosis 13
*Opportunistic pathogen 13
*Osteomyelitis 13
*Otitis media 13
*phaeohyphomycosis 13  ~Dark lesion on the septum is a  common presentation;  sinusitis √ is associated with  allergic rhinitis, √ polyps √ and/or  some form of immunosuppression (immunodeficiency) √  [David was diagnosed with CVD in 2003 & began 3 years of IV Immunoglobulin infusions]
*Sinusitis 13  √
*Ulcerated cutaneous infections  13
*Visceral infections 13

ASPERGILLUS [fungi]
*Airway epithelial injury 31
*Allergic Asthma 10   √
*Allergic Bronchopulmonary  - aspergillosis 7, 10, 14
*Allergic fungal sinusitis 7, 14 √
*Allergic mucin is recognized by its layered pattern of cells 31
*Allergies 7, 30   √
*Aspergillosis ( invasive infection,  colonization, toxicoses or allergy 7
*Aspergillus fungemia  14
*Asthma 7, 30 √
*Asthmatic airway injury 30
*Asthmatic changes are often present, including a polymorphous inflammatory infiltrate of eosinophils 31
*Bronchial wall is inflamed 31 
*Bronchocentric granulomatosis 31
*Carcinogenic 10, 14
*Cells include histologically viable and necrotic eosinophils and other inflammatory cells, cellular debris is often abundant 31 
*Cellular debris, and mucus 31 
*Cerebral aspergillosis 14 
*Charcot-Leyden crystals can be prominente 31 
*Chronic or exudative bronchiolitis 31
*Cutaneous aspergillosis 14 
*Dermatitis  30
*Diarrhea  30
*Dsseminated aspergillosis 14
*Endocarditis 14 
*Endophthalmitis 14 
*Eosinophilic Pneumonia 31
*Fatigue 30  √
*Fibrosis often accompany these inflammatory changes 31
*Fibrosis with destruction of bronchial structural elements leads to Bronchiectasis and parenchymal scarring  31
*Flu symptoms 30  √
*Fungal ball production (sinuses) 10, 30  √
*General malaise (tiredness)  30 √
*Goblet cell hyperplasia 31 
*Hair loss 30  √
*Hay fever 7 √
*Hepatocellular carcinoma 14
*Hepatosplenic aspergillosis 14
*Hypersensitive  diseases 30
*Hypersensitivity pneumonitis 7, 10    √
*Immunosupression (immunodeficiency) 10, 14, 30  √ [David was diagnosed with CVD in 2003 & began 3 years of IV Immunoglobulin infusions]
*Interference with blood cell formation.
*Lesions of the Gastrointestinal tract 30
*Lesions of the skin 30
*Liver cancer 30
*Lymphocytes, and plasma cells 31 
*Meningitis 14 
*Mucoid impaction of bronchi, bronchial lumens are filled and distended by mucus and inflammatory cells 31
*Muscular and cartilaginous loss  31
*Mutagenic 10
*Mycotoxins are believed to result in headaches 30   √
*Myocarditis 14 
*Neurotoxic 10
*Onychomycosis 14
*Osteomyelitis 14 
*Otomycosis 14 
*Pathologic manifestations of ABPA include mucoid impaction of bronchi 31
*Persistent airway inflammation 31
*Psychological depression 30
*Pulmonary aspergillosis 14 
*Sinonasal mycetoma  29
*Skin rashes 30 √
*Sore throats 30 √
*Squamous metaplasia 31
*Teratongenic effects 10
*Thickening of the basement membrane 31
*Ulceration 31


by Sandi Trend
Tuesday Feb 10th, 2009 10:54 PM
BOTRYTIS [fungi]
*Allergies 7 √
*Asthma 7 √
*Hay fever 7 √
*Hypersensitivity pneumonitis 7
*Winegrower's lung (rare form of hypersensitivity pneumonitis) 7

CLADOSPORIUM [fungi]
*Allergic Asthma 10 
*Allergic rhinitis 10    
*Allergies 7 √
*Asthma 7 √
*Causes chromoblastomycosis 7
*Hay fever 7  √
*Hypersensitivity  pneumonitis 7
*Keratitis 15
*Onychomycosis 15
*Pulmonary infections 15
*Sinusitis 15  √
*Skin lesions 15 

EPICOCCUM [fungi]
*Allergic Asthma 10 
*Allergies 7 √
*Asthma 7 √
*Hay fever 7 √

FUSARIUM [fungi]
*Allergies 7, 30  √
*Asthma 7, 30
*Asthmatic airway injury 30
*Balls of fungus 30  √
*Carcinogenic  19
*Causes Keratitis 7, 19
*Cutaneous infections 19 
*Dermatitis  30    √
*Diarrhea  30    √
*Disseminated infection 7, 19
*Disseminated fusariosis 19
*Endocarditis 19 
*Endophthalmitis 19
*Fatigue 30    √
*Flu symptoms 30    √
*Fungemia due to Fusarium spp. have been reported 19 
*Fusariosis 19
*General malaise (tiredness)  30   √
*Hair loss 30   √
*Hay fever 7 √
*Hypersensitive  diseases 30
*Immuno suppression 30   √
*Interference with blood cell formation.
*Lesions of the Gastrointestinal tract 30
*Lesions of the skin 30
*Liver cancer 30
*May cause oesophageal cancer  19
*mycetoma 7, 19
*Mycotic eye infections 7
*Mycotoxins are believed to result in headaches 30   √
*One of the emerging causes of opportunistic Mycoses 19
*Onychomycosis 7, 19
*Otitis media  19 
*Peritonitis 19 
*Psychological depression 30
*Pulmonary infections 19  
*Septic arthritis  19
*Sinonasal mycetoma  29
*Sinusitis  19   √
*Skin rashes 30    √
*Sore throats 30     √
*Superficial and systemic infections 19    √

HELMINTHOSPORIUM (fungi)
*Allergic Asthma 10   √
*Allergic Bronchopulmonary - Mycoses 10
*Asthma (can require hospitalization) 9
*Rhinitis 10   √

MUCOR (fungi)
*Gastritis 21 
*Mucocutaneous infections 21
*Perineural invasion 21
*Pulmonary infections 21
*Renal infections 21
*Rhinocerebral infections 21
*Septic arthritis  21
*Vascular invasion that causes necrosis of the infected tissue 21
*Zygomycosis 21

PULLULARIA (fungi)
*Severe Asthma  9

RHIZOPUS (fungi)*Disseminated infections 22 
*Gastrointestinal  infections 22  √
*Genitourinary 22 
*Mucocutaneous 22
*Perineural invasion are the most frustrating features of these infections 22
*Pulmonary infections 22
*Rhinocerebral 22 
*Vascular invasion that causes necrosis of the infected tissue 22
*Zygomycosis 22
*Zygomycosis - disseminated  22
*Zygomycosis is frequently fatal 22

STEMPHYLIUM [fungi]
*Allergies 7 √
*Asthma 7 √
*Hay fever 7 √
*phaeohyphomycosis: 
~Dark lesion on the septum is a  common presentation;  sinusitis √  is associated with  allergic rhinitis, √ polyps √ and/or some form of immunosuppression  √ ( immunodeficiency) [David was diagnosed with CVD in 2003 & began 3 years of IV Immunoglobulin infusions]
*Pphaeohyphomycotic (phaeohyphomycosis) sinusitis 7, 8  √

(REFERENCES FOLLOWING)
by Sandi Trend
Tuesday Feb 10th, 2009 11:01 PM
1. Paul Baumannla Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720  
2. “STUDIES ON CULTURED AND UNCULTURED MICROBIOTA OF WILD CULEX QUINQUEFASCIATUS MOSQUITO MIDGUT BASED ON 16S RIBOSOMAL RNA GENE ANALYSIS,” by VYANKATESH J.,  PIDIYAR*, KAMLESH JANGID*, MILIND S. PATOLE, AND YOGESH S. SHOUCHE, The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - 2004 Jun;70(6):597-603 
3. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY, May 1996, p. 1333–1336 Vol. 34, No. 5 
4.  HISTOPLASMOSIS: Protecting Workers at Risk; DHHS (NIOSH) PUBLICATION  NO. 97-146 SEPTEMBER 1997
5. DEPLOYMENT HEALTH and FAMILY READINESS LIBRARY
6. BMBL Section VII-B - Agent Summary Statements / Fungal Agents; CDC Office of    Safety and Health
7. Quantus Analytical - mold spore descriptions
8. Stemphylium spp. (described by Wallroth in 1833); Dr Fungus

• References:

• 531. de Hoog, G. S., J. Guarro, J. Gene, and M. J. Figueras. 2000. Atlas of Clinical Fungi, 2nd ed, vol. 1. Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

• 1295. Larone, D. H. 1995. Medically Important Fungi - A Guide to Identification, 3rd ed. ASM Press, Washington, D.C.

• 2202. Sutton, D. A., A. W. Fothergill, and M. G. Rinaldi (ed.). 1998. Guide to Clinically Significant Fungi, 1st ed. Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore.

• 2432. Wildfeuer, A., H. P. Seidl, I. Paule, and A. Haberreiter. 1998. In vitro evaluation of voriconazole against clinical isolates of yeasts, moulds and dermatophytes in comparison with itraconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and griseofulvin. Mycoses. 41:309-319.
9. Association between sensitization to Aurebasidlium pullulans (Pullularia sp) and severity of asthma, PMID:    17304882 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

10.  The Spectrum of Fungal Allergy; International  Archives of  Allergy and Immunology 2008;145:58–86

11.  Penicillium spp. (described by Link in 1809); Dr Fungus

• References:

• 423. Chariyalertsak, S., K. Supparatpinyo, T. Sirisanthana, and K. E. Nelson. 2001. A controlled trial of itraconazole as primary prophylaxis for systemic fungal infections in patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection in Thailand. Clin Infect Dis. 34:277-284.

• 431. Cheng, N. C., W. W. Wong, C. P. Fung, and C. Y. Liu. 1998. Unusual pulmonary manifestations of disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection in three AIDS patients. Med Mycol. 36:429-432.

• 531. de Hoog, G. S., J. Guarro, J. Gene, and M. J. Figueras. 2000. Atlas of Clinical Fungi, 2nd ed, vol. 1. Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

• 565. Deng, Z., J. L. Ribas, D. W. Gibson, and D. H. Connor. 1988. Infections caused by Penicillium marneffei in China and Southeast Asia: Review of eighteen published cases and report of four more Chinese cases. Rev. Infect. Dis. 10:640-652.

• 581. Deshpande, S. D., and G. V. Koppikar. 1999. A study of mycotic keratitis in Mumbai. Indian J Pathol Microbiol. 42:81-7.

• 803. Garbino, J., L. Kolarova, D. Lew, B. Hirschel, and P. Rohner. 2001. Fungemia in HIV-infected patients: A 12-year study in a tertiary care hospital. Aids Patient Care Stds. 15:407-410.

• 1094. Imwidthaya, P., K. Thipsuvan, A. Chaiprasert, S. Danchaivijitra, R. Sutthent, and J. Jearanaisilavong. 2001. Penicillium marneffei: types and drug susceptibility. Mycopathologia. 149:109-115.

• 1152. Kappe, R. 1999. Antifungal activity of the new azole UK-109, 496 (voriconazole). Mycoses. 42:83-86.

• 1295. Larone, D. H. 1995. Medically Important Fungi - A Guide to Identification, 3rd ed. ASM Press, Washington, D.C.

• 1371. Lortholary, O., D. W. Denning, and B. Dupont. 1999. Endemic mycoses: a treatment update. J Antimicrob Chemother. 43:321-331.

• 1489. McGinnis, M. R., N. G. Nordoff, N. S. Ryder, and G. B. Nunn. 2000. In vitro comparison of terbinafine and itraconazole against Penicillium marneffei. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44:1407-1408.

• 1804. Pitt, J. I. 2000. Toxigenic fungi: which are important? Med Mycol. 38:17-22.

• 1805. Pitt, J. I., J. C. Basilico, M. L. Abarca, and C. Lopez. 2000. Mycotoxins and toxigenic fungi. Med Mycol. 38:41-46.

• 1926. Rimek, D., T. Zimmermann, M. Hartmann, C. Prariyachatigul, and R. Kappe. 1999. Disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection in an HIV-positive female from Thailand in Germany. Mycoses. 42:25-28.

• 2114. Singh, P. N., K. Ranjana, Y. I. Singh, K. P. Singh, S. S. Sharma, M. Kulachandra, Y. Nabakumar, A. Chakrabarti, A. A. Padhye, L. Kaufman, and L. Ajello. 1999. Indigenous disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection in the state of Manipur, India: Report of four autochthonous cases. J Clin Microbiol. 37:2699-2702.

• 2144. St-Germain, G., and R. Summerbell. 1996. Identifying Filamentous Fungi - A Clinical Laboratory Handbook, 1st ed. Star Publishing Company, Belmont, California.

• 2200. Supparatpinyuo, K., S. Chiewchanvit, P. Hirunsri, C. Uthammachai, K. E. Nelson, and T. Sirisanthana. 1992. Penicillium marneffei infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Clin. Infect. Dis. 14:871-874.

• 2202. Sutton, D. A., A. W. Fothergill, and M. G. Rinaldi (ed.). 1998. Guide to Clinically Significant Fungi, 1st ed. Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore.

• 2432. Wildfeuer, A., H. P. Seidl, I. Paule, and A. Haberreiter. 1998. In vitro evaluation of voriconazole against clinical isolates of yeasts, moulds and dermatophytes in comparison with itraconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and griseofulvin. Mycoses. 41:309-319.

• 2456. Wong, S. S. Y., K. H. Wong, W. T. Hui, S. S. Lee, J. Y. C. Lo, L. Cao, and K. Y. Yuen. 2001. Differences in clinical and laboratory diagnostic characteristics of penicilliosis marneffei in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- and non-HIV-infected patients. J Clin Microbiol. 39:4535-4540.


12.  Acremonium spp. (described by Link ex Fries in 1809); Dr Fungus  

• References:

• 462. Collier, L., A. Balows, and M. Sussman. 1998. Topley & Wilson's Microbiology and Microbial Infections, 9th ed, vol. 4. Arnold, London, Sydney, Auckland, New York.

• 683. Espinel-Ingroff, A. 1998. Comparison of in vitro activities of the new triazole SCH56592 and the echinocandins MK-0991 (L-743,872) and LY303366 against opportunistic filamentous and dimorphic fungi and yeasts. J Clin Microbiol. 36:2950-2956.

• 730. Fincher, R. M., J. F. Fisher, R. D. Lovell, C. L. Newman, A. Espinel-Ingroff, and H. J. Shadomy. 1991. Infection due to the fungus Acremonium (Cephalosporium). Medicine. 70:398-409.

• 914. Guarro, J., W. Gams, I. Pujol, and J. Gene. 1997. Acremonium species: New emerging fungal opportunitis--In vitro antifungal susceptibilities and review. Clin. Infect. Dis.:1222-1229.

• 952. Gupta, A. K., and R. C. Summerbell. 1999. Combined distal and lateral subungual and white superficial onychomycosis in the toenails. J Am Acad Dermatol. 41:938-44.

• 1295. Larone, D. H. 1995. Medically Important Fungi - A Guide to Identification, 3rd ed. ASM Press, Washington, D.C.

• 1434. Marco, F., M. A. Pfaller, S. A. Messer, and R. N. Jones. 1998. In vitro activity of a new triazole antifungal agent, Sch 56592, against clinical isolates of filamentous fungi. Mycopathologia. 141:73-77.

• 1494. McGinnis, M. R., L. Pasarell, D. A. Sutton, A. W. Fothergill, C. R. Cooper, and M. G. Rinaldi. 1998. In vitro activity of voriconazole against selected fungi. Med Mycol. 36:239-242.

• 1581. Morrison, V. A., R. J. Haake, and D. J. Weisdorf. 1993. The spectrum of non-Candida fungal infections following bone marrow transplantation. Medicine (Baltimore). 72:78-89.

• 1750. Penk, A., and L. Pittrow. 1999. Role of fluconazole in the long-term suppressive therapy of fungal infections in patients with artificial implants. Mycoses. 42:91-96.

• 2144. St-Germain, G., and R. Summerbell. 1996. Identifying Filamentous Fungi - A Clinical Laboratory Handbook, 1st ed. Star Publishing Company, Belmont, California.


13. Alternaria spp. (described by Nees ex Wallroth in 1816); Dr Fungus

• References:

• 66. Anaissie, E. J., G. P. Bodey, and M. G. Rinaldi. 1989. Emerging fungal pathogens. Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 8:323-330.

• 462. Collier, L., A. Balows, and M. Sussman. 1998. Topley & Wilson's Microbiology and Microbial Infections, 9th ed, vol. 4. Arnold, London, Sydney, Auckland, New York.

• 558. Del Poeta, M., W. A. Schell, and J. R. Perfect. 1997. In vitro antifungal activity of pneumocandin L-743,872 against a variety of clinically important molds. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:1835-1836.

• 590. Diaz, M., R. Puente, and M. A. Treviño. 1990. Response of long-running Alternaria alternata infection to fluconazole. Lancet. 336:513.

• 802. Garau, J., R. D. Diamond, L. B. Lagrotteria, and S. A. Kabins. 1977. Alternaria osteomyelitis [letter]. Ann. Intern. Med. 86:747-8.

• 1295. Larone, D. H. 1995. Medically Important Fungi - A Guide to Identification, 3rd ed. ASM Press, Washington, D.C.

• 1429. Manning, S. C., S. D. Schaefer, L. G. Close, and F. Vuitch. 1991. Culture-positive allergic fungal sinusitis. Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery. 117:174-8.

• 1581. Morrison, V. A., R. J. Haake, and D. J. Weisdorf. 1993. The spectrum of non-Candida fungal infections following bone marrow transplantation. Medicine (Baltimore). 72:78-89.

• 1847. Pritchard, R. C., and D. B. Muir. 1987. Black fungi: a survey of dematiaceous hyphomycetes from clinical specimens identified over a five year period in a reference laboratory. Pathology. 19:281-4.

• 1864. Radford, S. A., E. M. Johnson, and D. W. Warnock. 1997. In vitro studies of activity of voriconazole (UK-104,496), a new triazole antifungal agent, against emerging and less-common mold pathogens. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:841-843.

• 2042. Schell, W. A. 2000. Unusual fungal pathogens in fungal rhinosinusitis. Otolaryngol Clin N Amer. 33:367-373,X.

• 2144. St-Germain, G., and R. Summerbell. 1996. Identifying Filamentous Fungi - A Clinical Laboratory Handbook, 1st ed. Star Publishing Company, Belmont, California.

• 2297. Vartivarian, S. E., E. J. Anaissie, and G. P. Bodey. 1993. Emerging fungal pathogens in immunocompromised patients: classification, diagnosis, and management. Clin. Infect. Dis. 17:S487-91.

• 2306. Vennewald, I., M. Henker, E. Klemm, and C. Seebacher. 1999. Fungal colonization of the paranasal sinuses. Mycoses. 42:33-36.

• 2345. Wadhwani, K., and A. K. Srivastava. 1984. Fungi from otitis media of agricultural field workers. Mycopathologia. 88:155-9.

• 2432. Wildfeuer, A., H. P. Seidl, I. Paule, and A. Haberreiter. 1998. In vitro evaluation of voriconazole against clinical isolates of yeasts, moulds and dermatophytes in comparison with itraconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and griseofulvin. Mycoses. 41:309-319.

14. Aspergillus spp. (described by Micheli ex Link in 1809); Dr Fungus

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• 120. Arikan, S., M. Lozano-Chiu, V. Paetznick, and J. H. Rex. 2001. In vitro susceptibility testing methods for caspofungin against Aspergillus and Fusarium isolates. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 45:327-330.

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• 462. Collier, L., A. Balows, and M. Sussman. 1998. Topley & Wilson's Microbiology and Microbial Infections, 9th ed, vol. 4. Arnold, London, Sydney, Auckland, New York.

• 567. Denning, D. W. 1998. Invasive aspergillosis. Clin Infect Dis. 26:781-803.

• 568. Denning, D. W. 1996. Therapeutic outcome in invasive aspergillosis. Clin. Infect. Dis. 23:608-615.

• 569. Denning, D. W. 1994. Treatment of invasive aspergillosis. J. Infect. 28 (Suppl. 1):25-33.

• 572. Denning, D. W., A. Marinus, J. Cohen, D. Spence, R. Herbrecht, L. Pagano, C. Kibbler, V. Kcrmery, F. Offner, C. Cordonnier, U. Jehn, M. Ellis, L. Collette, R. Sylvester, and EORTC Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group. 1998. An EORTC multicentre prospective survey of invasive aspergillosis in haematological patients: Diagnosis and therapeutic outcome. J. Infect. 37:173-180.

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• 578. Denning, D. W., K. Venkateswarlu, K. L. Oakley, M. J. Anderson, N. J. Manning, D. A. Stevens, D. W. Warnock, and S. L. Kelly. 1997. Itraconazole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:1364-1368.

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• 638. Duthie, R., and D. W. Denning. 1995. Aspergillus fungemia: Report of two cases and review. Clin. Infect. Dis. 20:598-605.

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• 800. Galimberti, R., A. Kowalczuk, I. H. Parra, M. G. Ramos, and V. Flores. 1998. Cutaneous aspergillosis: a report of six cases. Brit J Dermatol. 139:522-526.

• 811. Garrett, D. O., E. Jochimsen, and W. Jarvis. 1999. Invasive Aspergillus spp infections in rheumatology patients. J Rheumatol. 26:146-149.

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• 829. Germaud, P., and E. Tuchais. 1995. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis treated with itraconazole. Chest. 107:883.

• 830. Gerson, S. L., G. H. Talbot, S. Hurwitz, B. L. Strom, E. J. Lusk, and P. A. Cassileth. 1984. Prolonged granulocytopenia: the major risk factor for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with acute leukemia. Ann. Intern. Med. 100:345-351.

• 839. Gillespie, M. B., and B. W. O'Malley. 2000. An algorithmic approach to the diagnosis and management of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in the immunocompromised patient. Otolaryngol Clin N Amer. 33:323-334,IX.

• 852. Glimp, R. A., and A. S. Bayer. 1983. Pulmonary aspergilloma. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Arch Intern Med. 143:303-8.

• <;li style="text-align: center;">874. Gordon, G., and N. A. Giddings. 1994. Invasive otitis externa due to Aspergillus species: Case report and review. Clin. Infect. Dis. 19:866-870.

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• 938. Gumbo, T., A. J. Taege, S. Mawhorter, M. C. McHenry, B. H. Lytle, D. M. Cosgrove, and S. M. Gordon. 2000. Aspergillus valve endocarditis in patients without prior cardiac surgery. Medicine. 79:261-268.

• 952. Gupta, A. K., and R. C. Summerbell. 1999. Combined distal and lateral subungual and white superficial onychomycosis in the toenails. J Am Acad Dermatol. 41:938-44.

• 958. Gurwith, M. 1999. Clinical efficacy of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion against infections caused by Aspergillus spp. Chemotherapy. 45:34-38.

• 974. Halpern, M., S. Szabo, E. Hochberg, G. S. Hammer, J. Lin, A. C. Gurtman, H. S. Sacks, R. S. Shapiro, and S. Z. Hirschman. 1992. Renal aspergilloma: an unusual cause of infection in a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Am. J. Med. 92:437-440.

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• 1091. Ikeda, F., Y. Wakai, S. Matsumoto, K. Maki, E. Watabe, S. Tawara, T. Goto, Y. Watanabe, F. Matsumoto, and S. Kuwahara. 2000. Efficacy of FK463, a new lipopeptide antifungal agent, in mouse models of disseminated candidiasis and aspergillosis. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44:614-618.

• 1129. Johnson, E. M., J. O. Ojwang, A. Szekely, T. L. Wallace, and D. W. Warnock. 1998. Comparison of in vitro antifungal activities of free and liposome-encapsulated nystatin with those of four amphotericin B formulations. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 42:1412-1416.

• 1130. Johnson, E. M., A. Szekely, and D. W. Warnock. 1998. In-vitro activity of voriconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B against filamentous fungi. J Antimicrob Chemother. 42:741-745.

• 1152. Kappe, R. 1999. Antifungal activity of the new azole UK-109, 496 (voriconazole). Mycoses. 42:83-86.

• 1161. Katz, G., K. Winchester, and S. Lam. 1993. Ocular aspergillosis isolated in the anterior chamber. Ophthalmology. 100:1815-1818.

• 1271. Kurup, V. P., and B. Banerjee. 2000. Fungal allergens and peptide epitopes. Peptides. 21:589-599.

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• 2203. Sutton, D. A., S. E. Sanche, S. G. Revankar, A. W. Fothergill, and M. G. Rinaldi. 1999. In vitro amphotericin B resistance in clinical isolates of Aspergillus terreus, with a head-to-head comparison to voriconazole. J Clin Microbiol. 37:2343-2345.

• 2352. Wallace, T. L., V. Paetznick, P. A. Cossum, G. Lopez-Berenstein, J. H. Rex, and E. Anaissie. 1997. Activity of liposomal nystatin against disseminated Aspergillus fumigatus infection in neutropenic mice. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:2238-2243.


by Sandi Trend
Tuesday Feb 10th, 2009 11:03 PM
15. Cladosporium spp. Link ex Gray, 1821, de Hoog (1995); Dr Fungus

• References:

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• 533. De Hoog, G. S., F. Queiroz-Telles, G. Haase, G. Fernandez-Zeppenfeldt, D. A. Angelis, A. van den Ende, T. Matos, H. Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, A. A. Pizzirani-Kleiner, J. Rainer, N. Richard-Yegres, V. Vicente, and F. Yegres. 2000. Black fungi: clinical and pathogenic approaches. Med Mycol. 38:243-250.

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• 1847. Pritchard, R. C., and D. B. Muir. 1987. Black fungi: a survey of dematiaceous hyphomycetes from clinical specimens identified over a five year period in a reference laboratory. Pathology. 19:281-4.

• 2202. Sutton, D. A., A. W. Fothergill, and M. G. Rinaldi (ed.). 1998. Guide to Clinically Significant Fungi, 1st ed. Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore.


16.  Curvularia spp. (described by Boedijn in 1933); Dr Fungus

• References:

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• 558. Del Poeta, M., W. A. Schell, and J. R. Perfect. 1997. In vitro antifungal activity of pneumocandin L-743,872 against a variety of clinically important molds. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:1835-1836.

• 580. deShazo, R. D., and R. E. Swain. 1995. Diagnostic criteria for allergic fungal sinusitis. Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology. 96:24-35.

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• 726. Fernandez, M., D. E. Noyola, S. N. Rossmann, and M. S. Edwards. 1999. Cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Curvularia lunata and a review of Curvularia infections in pediatrics. Pediat Inf Dis J. 18:727-731.

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• 913. Guarro, J., T. Akiti, R. Almada-Horta, L. A. M. Leite, J. Gene, S. Ferreira-Gomes, C. Aguilar, and M. Ortoneda. 1999. Mycotic keratitis due to Curvularia senegalensis and in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of Curvularia spp. J Clin Microbiol. 37:4170-4173.

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• 2202. Sutton, D. A., A. W. Fothergill, and M. G. Rinaldi (ed.). 1998. Guide to Clinically Significant Fungi, 1st ed. Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore.

• 2252. Travis, W. D., K. J. Kwon-Chung, D. E. Kleiner, A. Geber, W. Lawson, H. I. Pass, and D. Henderson. 1991. Unusual aspects of allergic bronchopulmonary fungal disease: report of two cases due to Curvularia organisms associated with allergic fungal sinusitis. Hum Pathol. 22:1240-8.

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• 2468. Yau, Y. C. W., J. deNanassy, R. C. Summerbell, M. A. G, and S. E. Richardson. 1994. Fungal sternal wound infection due to Curvularia lunata in a neonate with congential heart disease: Case report and review. Clin. Infect. Dis. 19:735-740.


17,  Histoplasma sp. Darling, 1906; Dr Fungus

• References:

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• 716. Farina, C., F. Vailati, A. Manisco, and A. Goglio. 1999. Fungaemia survey: a 10-year experience in Bergamo, Italy. Mycoses. 42:543-548.

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• 1152. Kappe, R. 1999. Antifungal activity of the new azole UK-109, 496 (voriconazole). Mycoses. 42:83-86.

• 1221. Kohler, S., L. J. Wheat, P. Connolly, C. Schnizlein-Bick, M. Durkin, M. Smedema, J. Goldberg, and E. Brizendine. 2000. Comparison of the echinocandin caspofungin with amphotericin B for treatment of histoplasmosis following pulmonary challenge in a murine model. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44:1850-1854.

• 1295. Larone, D. H. 1995. Medically Important Fungi - A Guide to Identification, 3rd ed. ASM Press, Washington, D.C.

• 1338. Li, R. K., M. A. Ciblak, N. Nordoff, L. Pasarell, D. W. Warnock, and M. R. McGinnis. 2000. In vitro activities of voriconazole, itraconazole, and amphotericin B against Blastomyces dermatitidis, Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44:1734-1736.

• 1371. Lortholary, O., D. W. Denning, and B. Dupont. 1999. Endemic mycoses: a treatment update. J Antimicrob Chemother. 43:321-331.

• 1655. Norris, S., J. Wheat, D. McKinsey, D. Lancaster, B. Katz, J. Black, M. Driks, R. Baker, K. Israel, D. Traeger, S. Moriarity, J. Fraiz, D. Webb, and T. Slama. 1994. Prevention of relapse of histoplasmosis with fluconazole in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Am. J. Med. 96:504-508.

• 2067. Sebghati, T. S., J. T. Engle, and W. E. Goldman. 2000. Intracellular parasitism by Histoplasma capsulatum: Fungal virulence and calcium dependence. Science. 290:1368-1372.

• 2144. St-Germain, G., and R. Summerbell. 1996. Identifying Filamentous Fungi - A Clinical Laboratory Handbook, 1st ed. Star Publishing Company, Belmont, California.

• 2202. Sutton, D. A., A. W. Fothergill, and M. G. Rinaldi (ed.). 1998. Guide to Clinically Significant Fungi, 1st ed. Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore.

• 2413. Wheat, J., P. Marichal, H. Vanden Bossche, A. L. Monte, and P. Connolly. 1997. Hypothesis on the mechanisms of resistance to fluconazole in Histoplasma capsulatum. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 41:410-414.

• 2414. Wheat, J., S. MaWhinney, R. Hafner, D. McKinsey, D. Chen, A. Korzun, K. J. Shakan, P. Johnson, R. Hamill, D. Bamberger, P. Pappas, J. Stansell, S. Koletar, K. Squires, R. A. Larsen, T. Cheung, N. Hyslop, K. K. Lai, D. Schneider, C. Kauffman, M. Saag, W. Dismukes, W. Powderly, and National Institute of allergy and Infectious Diseases Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Clinical Trials Group and Myocses Study Group. 1997. Treatment of histoplasmosis with fluconazole in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Am. J. Med. 103:223-232.

• 2416. Wheat, L. J., P. Connolly-Stringfield, R. B. Kohler, P. T. Frame, and M. R. Gupta. 1989. Histoplasma capsulatum polysaccharide antigen detection in diagnosis and management of disseminated histoplasmosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Am. J. Med. 87:396-400.


18. Epicoccum spp. (described by Link ex Steudel in 1824); Dr Fungus


19. Fusarium spp. (described by Link ex Gray in 1821); Dr Fungus

• References:

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• 66. Anaissie, E. J., G. P. Bodey, and M. G. Rinaldi. 1989. Emerging fungal pathogens. Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 8:323-330.

• 119. Arikan, S., M. Lozano-Chiu, V. Paetznick, S. Nangia, and J. H. Rex. 1999. Microdilution susceptibility testing of amphotericin B, itraconazole, and voriconazole against clinical isolates of Aspergillus and Fusarium species. J Clin Microbiol. 37:3946-3951.

• 120. Arikan, S., M. Lozano-Chiu, V. Paetznick, and J. H. Rex. 2001. In vitro susceptibility testing methods for caspofungin against Aspergillus and Fusarium isolates. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 45:327-330.

• 121. Arikan, S., M. Lozano-Chiu, V. Paetznick, and J. H. Rex. 2000. In vitro synergy studies with caspofungin and amphotericin B against Aspergillus and Fusarium. 40th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Abstract No. J-932.

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20. Helminthosporium spp. (described by Link ex Fries in 1821 nom. cons.); Dr Fungus


21. Mucor spp. (described by Micheli ex Saint-Amans in 1821); Dr Fungus

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22,  Rhizopus spp. (described by Ehrenberg ex Corda in 1838); Dr Fungus

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• 1130. Johnson, E. M., A. Szekely, and D. W. Warnock. 1998. In-vitro activity of voriconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B against filamentous fungi. J Antimicrob Chemother. 42:741-745.

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• 1731. Patel, R., D. Portela, A. D. Badley, W. S. Harmsen, J. J. Larson-Keller, D. M. Ilstrup, M. R. Keating, R. H. Wiesner, R. A. Krom, and C. V. Paya. 1996. Risk factors of invasive Candida and non-Candida fungal infections after liver transplantation. Transplantation. 62:926-934.

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• 1782. Pfaller, M. A., S. A. Messer, R. J. Hollis, and R. N. Jones. 2002. Antifungal activities of posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole compared to those of itraconazole and amphotericin B against 239 clinical isolates of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi: Report from SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 2000. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46:1032-1037.

• 1918. Ribes, J. A., C. L. Vanover-Sams, and D. J. Baker. 2000. Zygomycetes in human disease. Clin Microbiol Rev. 13:236-301.

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23. Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology; Kenneth Todar, PhD
24. Staphylococcus; From MicrobeWiki, the student-edited microbiology resource 

• REFERENCES:

• -Bacteriology at UW-Madison: Staphylococcus

• -Gill S.R., Founts D. E., ARcher G. L., Mongodis E. F., Deboy R. T., Ravel J., Paulsen I. T., Kolonay J. F., Brinkac L., Beanan M., Dodson R. J., Daughtery S. C., Madupu R., Angiuoli S. V., Durkin A. S., Haft D. H., Vamathevan J., Khouri H., Utterback T., Lee C., Dimitrov G., Jiang L., Qin H., Weidman J., Tran K., Kang K., Hance I. R., Nelson K. E., Fraser C. M. "Insights on evolution of virulence and resistance from the complete genome analysis of an early methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and a biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strain." Journal of bacteriology 2005 Apr;187(7):2426-38.

• -HGM 2002: Comparison of genomes between Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus

• -Kuroda, M. et al. 2001. Whole genome sequencing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The Lancet, 357: 1225-1240

• -Newton Science Magazine: The Bug Stops Here

• -Princeton University: Staphylococcus

• -Sanger Institute: Staphylococcus aureus

• -The Nemours Foundation: Staphylococcus aureus

• -University of South Carolina: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococci
25. Fatal Cerebral Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Curvularia lunata in an Immunocompetent Patient; Elliot Carter* and Carole Boudreaux - Department of Pathology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama;; Journal of Clinical Microbiology
26. Health News; CDC warns of the fungus histoplasmosis; UPI.com  - 100 years of journalistic excellence
27. Church Volunteers Stricken With Lung Ailment, By Roni Caryn Rabin, Pulblised December 22, 2008: The New York Times
28. Unusual rhinosinusitis caused by Curvularia fungi; From the Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans.
REFERENCES:
(1.) Wilhelmus KR, Jones DB. Curvularia keratitis. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 2001:99:111-30: discussion 130-2. 
(2.) Nishioka G, Schwartz JG, Rinaldi MG, et al. Fungal maxillary sinusitis caused by Curvularia lunata. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1987; 113:665-6. 
(3.) Ebright JR, Chandrasekar PH, Marks S, et al. Invasive sinusitis and cerebritis due to Curvularia clavata in an immunocompetent adult. Clin Infect Dis 1999;28:687-9. 
(4.) Schell WA. Unusual fungal pathogens in fungal rhinosinusitis. Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2000,33:367-73.
29. Sinonasal mycetoma - Enrique Palacios, MD, FACR; Wesley Jones, MD; Jorge Alvernia, MD; From the Department of Radiology (Dr. Palacios and Dr. Jones) and the Department of Neurosurgery (Dr. Alvernia), Tulane University Hospital and Clinic, New Orleans. 
REFERENCES: 
(1.) Som PM, Brandwein MS. Inflammatory diseases. In: Som PM, Curtin HD. Head and Neck Imaging. 4th ed. St. Louis: Mosby; 2003:193-259. 
(2.) Fellows DW, King VD, Conturo T, et al. In vitro evaluation of MR hypointensity in Aspergillus colonies. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 1994;15(6):1139-44. 
(3.) Gunduz K, Orguc S, Demireli P, et al. A case of mycetoma successfully treated with itraconazole and co-trimoxazole. Mycoses 2006;49(5):436-8. 
(4.) Jiang RS, Hsu CY. Serum immunoglobulins and IgG subclass levels in sinus mycetoma. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2004;130 (5):563-6. 
(5.) Kumar J, Kumar A, Sethy P, Gupta S. The dot-in-circle sign of mycetoma on MRI. Diagn Interv Radiol 2007;13(4):193-5. 
(6.) Klossek JM, Serrano E, Peloquin L, et al. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery and 109 mycetomas of paranasal sinuses. Laryngoscope 1997;107(1):112-17. 
(7.) deShazo RID. Fungal sinusitis. Am J Med Sci 1998;316(1):39-45. 
(8.) Pagella F, Matti E, De Bernardi F, et al. Paranasal sinus fungus ball: Diagnosis and management. Mycoses 2007;50(6):451-6.
30. Mold Biology and Mold Related Heath Issues 
31. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: An Overview
32. Actinomyces odontolyticus bacteremia
REFERENCES:
(1.) Morton HS. Actinomycosis. Can Med Assoc J 1940;42:231-6.
(2.) Molto JE. Differential diagnosis of rib lesions: a cast study from Middle Woodland southern Ontario circa 230 A.D. Am J Phys Anthropol 1990;83:439-47.
(3.) Bollinger O. Ueber eine neue Pilzkrankheit beim Rinde. Zentralblatt Medizinische Wissenschaft 1877;15:481-90.
(4.) Thompson L. Isolation and comparison of Actinomyces from human and bovine infections. Proceedings of the Staff Meetings Mayo Clinic 1950;25:81-90.
(5.) Israel J. Neue Beobachtungen auf dem Gebiete der Mykosen des Menschen. Archiv Pathologische Anatomie 1878;64:15-31.
(6.) Wolff M, Israel J. Ueber Reincultur des Actinomyces und seine Uebertragbarkeit auf Thiere. Archiv Pathologische Anatomie 1891;126:11-28.
(7.) Griner LA. Pathology of zoo animals. San Diego (CA): Zoologic Society of San Diego; 1983.
(8.) Batty I. Actinomyces odontolyticus, a new species of actinomycete
actinomycete: Any of a group of generally low-oxygen–utilizing bacteria identified by a branching growth pattern that results in large threadlike structures. The filaments may break apart to form rods or spheroidal shapes. Some actinomycetes can form spores.
regularly isolated from deep carious car·i·ous adj. Having caries; decayed.
carious (ker´ēus), adj pertaining to caries or decay.  dentine. J Path Bactiol 1958;75:455-9.
(9.) Morris JF, Kilbourn P. Systemic actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces odontolyticus. Ann Intern Med 1974;81:700.
(10.) Mitchell PD, Hintz CS, Haselby RC. Malar malar /ma·lar/ (ma´lar) 1. buccal; pertaining to the cheek. 2. zygomatic. 
ma·lar adj. Of or relating to the cheekbone or the cheek. n. The cheekbone.  mass due to Actinomyces odontolyticus. J Clin Microbiol 1977;5:658-60.
(11.) Hutton RM, Behrens RH. Actinomyces odontolyticus as a cause of brain abscess. J Infect 1979;1:195-7.
(12.) Baron EJ, Angevine JM, Sundstrom W. Actinomycotic pulmonary abscess in an immunosuppressed patient. Am J Clin Pathol 1979;72:637-9.
(13.) Guillou JP, Durieux R, Bublanchet A, Chevrier L. Actinomyces odontolyticus, premiere etude realisee en France. C R Acad Sci Hebd Seances Acad Sci D 1977;285:1561-4.
(14.) Ruutu P, Pentikainen PJ, Larinkari U, Lempinen M. Hepatic actinomycosis presenting as repeated cholestatic reactions. Scand J Infect Dis 1982;14:235-8.
(15.) Klaaborg K-E, Kronborg O, Olsen H. Enterocutaneous fistulization due to Actinomyces odontolyticus. Report of a case. Dis Colon Rectum 1985;28:526-7.
(16.) Peloux Y, Raoult D, Chardon, Escarguel JP. Actinomyces odontolyticus infections: review of six patients. J Infect 1985;11:125-9.
(17.) Bellingan GJ. Disseminated actinomycosis: association with rapidly progressing cervical cord lesion. BMJ 1990;301:1323-4.
(18.) Hooi LN, Sin KS. A case of empyema  empyema (ĕmpē-ē`mə), persistent purulent discharge into a cavity such as the pleural space or the gallbladder. Empyema results as a complication of bacterial infections such as pneumonia and lung abscess.  caused by actinomycosis. Med J Malaysia 1992;47:311-5.
(19.) Verrot D, Disdier P, Harle JR, Peloux Y, Garbes L, Arnaud A, et al. Actinomycose pulmonaire: responsabilite d=Actinomyces odontolyticus? Rev Med Interne in·terne n. Variant of intern.  1993;14:179-81.
(20.) Ibanez-Nolla J, Carratala J, Cucurull JJ, Corbella X, Oliveras A, Curull V, et al. Actinomicosis toracica. Enfenn Infecc Microbiol Clin 1993;11:433-6.
(21.) Dontfraid F, Ramphal R. Bilateral pulmonary infiltrates in association with disseminated actinomycosis. Clin Infect Dis 1994; 19:143-5.
(22.) Mateos-Colino A, Monte-Secades R, Ibanez-Alonso D, Santiago-Toscano J, Rububal-Rey, Solian del Cerro JL. Actinomyces como etiologia de empiema. Arch Bronconeumol 1995;31:293-5.
(23.) Bassiri AG, Girgis RE, Theodore J. Actinomyces odontolyicus thoracopulmonary infections. Two cases in lung and heart-lung recipients and a review of the literature. Chest 1996;109:1109-11.
(24.) Perez-Castrillon JL, Gonzalez-Castaneda C, del Campo-Matias F, Bellido-Casado J, Diaz G. Empyema necessitatis due to Actinomyces odontolyticus. Chest 1997;111:1144.
(25.) Litwin KA, Jadbabaie F, Villanueva M. Case of pleuropericardial disease caused by Actinomyces odontolyticus that resulted in cardiac tamponade Cardiac Tamponade Definition Cardiac tamponade occurs when the heart is squeezed by fluid that collects inside the sac that surrounds it. Description The heart is surrounded by a sac called the pericardium. . Clin Infect Dis 1999;29:219-20.
(26.) Brown JR. Human actinomycosis. A study of 181 subjects. Hum Pathol 1973;4:319-30.
(27.) Mitchell RG, Crow MR. Actinomyces odontolyticus isolated from the female genital tract. J Clin Pathol 1984;37:1379-83.
(28.) Stromberg N, Boren T. Actinomyces tissue specificity may depend on differences in receptor specificity for GalNAcbeta-containing glycoconjugates. Infect Immun 1992;60:3268-77.
Lawrence A. Cone,* ([dagger]) Millie M. Leung, ([dagger]) and Joel Hirschberg * ([dagger])
* Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage, California
Rancho Mirage is a city in Riverside County, California, United States. The population was 13,249 at the 2000 census, but the seasonal (part-time) population can exceed 20,000.
, USA; and ([dagger]) Harbor-University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, California, USA
Dr. Cone is an infectious diseases clinician at the Eisenhower Medical Center, assistant clinical professor of medicine at University of California
The University of California has a combined student body of more than 191,000 students, over 1,340,000 living alumni, and a combined systemwide and campus endowment of just over $7.3 billion (8th largest in the United States).
at Los Angeles, and clinical professor of medicine at University of California, Riverside
The University of California, Riverside, commonly known as UCR or UC Riverside, is a public research university and one of ten campuses of the University of California system.
. His research interests include genetics, immune deficiencies, and sepsis.
Address for correspondence: Lawrence A. Cone, Eisenhower Medical Center, Probst Professional Building, Suite #308, 39000 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage, CA 92270 USA; fax: 760 773-3976; email: laconemedico [at] aol.com

-END-
by M J Rog
Monday Feb 16th, 2009 3:08 PM
Sandi,

Thanks for making my point.

Your multiple pages of references do not add to thoughtful discourse.

People who have the Factitious Disorder in the DSM IV known as Munchausen’s by Proxy Syndrome engage in "pseudologia fantastica." Several pages of references is a form of this 'pseudo logic.'

I hope your son gets appropriate diagnosis and treatment. A referral to an independent, competent mental health professional could change his life.

by Exposing Marrone's Corporate Flacks
Monday Feb 16th, 2009 3:31 PM
640_osha-how_everyday_products_make_people_sick.jpg
One of the sick things about the criminals like Pam Marrone and "Dr Death M J Rog" is to say that injured workers and those who support them are mentally ill. In fact it is a sick system that Pam Marrone, her defender M J Rog and the Buffet owned Liberty Mutual company to attack the very workers that they should be defending. Since the massive deregulation likely supported by MJ Rog, the oversight over companies like Agraquest has been virtually eliminated. California with over 17 million workers has no doctors at Ca-Osha which is supposed to by protecting the health and safety of workers in California. The EPA and many other agencies have conspired to cover up serious health contamination which has led to sickness and death of people throughout the United States. The recent deaths in the peanut contamination are only the tip of the iceberg but then MR Rog probably thinks those people who were sickened by the peanuts really just had mental problems. This is the usual corporate response to illness. The carpal tunnel epidemic was also another example of the corporate whores telling injured workers including large number of women store clerks that their problems were only in their heads.
Those workers like David Bell who get sick on the job and then try to get workers comp become the "enemy" or "mentally ill" in a very sick system where employment based medical care benefits the insurance industry billionaires.
It is obviously getting under the skin of this "psychiatrist" Dr. Death M J Rog that the David Bell case is not going away and in fact is getting closer to exposing the criminal cover-up by Morrone and Liberty Mutual. Pam Marrone and her allies think that they can continue to make their millions of dollars while workers get sick and the community is contaminated. They will find out that their actions and lies will be catching up with them and the pressure to criminally prosecute them will grow.
by Grant Philpott
Monday Mar 2nd, 2009 12:28 AM
Between 2002 and 2004 the New Zealand government used the Btk based insecticide Foray 48b many times on the city I live in.
I became gravely ill and started having reactions to Foray 48b. The government's own health service even admitted I was reacting to Foray 48b.
I was diagnosed with leukemia(CLL), which blood tests revealed I had contracted during the spraying and in 2005 I nearly died from the failure of my endocrine system.
Doctors denied that these conditions and others that tests revealed( like my body stopped producing vitamin D, chronic infections, testes pain) were related to Foray 48b.
In 2007 I found out about four patents for the genetic modification of the Btk in Foray 48b by adding the genotoxin chloramphenicol to the nutrient broth that forms the basis of Foray 48b.
Research revealed every "disease" I got during the spraying of Foray 48b were consistent with poisoning by chloramphenicol. Not only that but chloramphenicol targets people like me that are sensitive to benzene based 'preservatives'.
Do I have Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy. Or was I poisoned by a genotoxin.
by Bonnie Smith
Tuesday Oct 6th, 2009 8:47 AM
David Bell has the same remedy at law everyone does that is through the workers comp system It is his fault he did not use protective equipment , he chose to ignore the rules and he today is the illustration of what occurs when you do not follow the rules WC is based on salery and david thus is entitled to just what the system allows that is benifits which are based on his job
No where has Mr Bell spoken he is the one injured yet he does not speak out there fore it appears the first poster is correct Ms Trend is seeking and using the By Proxy of Maunchausen to get attention she needs to find a life The workers comp system is working just fine in California Mr Bell is getting the benifits allowed under the law and that is all he is entitled to
by st
(biotechharm [at] gmail.com) Wednesday Oct 7th, 2009 12:35 AM
Bonnie Smith,

I wish to address your comment of October 6, 2009:

"David Bell has the same remedy at law everyone does that is through the workers comp system It is his fault he did not use protective equipment , he chose to ignore the rules and he today is the illustration of what occurs when you do not follow the rules WC is based on salery and david thus is entitled to just what the system allows that is benifits which are based on his job" and "Mr Bell is getting the benifits allowed under the law and that is all he is entitled to."

With all due respect Ms. Smith, you are entirely wrong. Because Agraquest DID NOT report David's illness as a result of known and UNKNOWN fungus and bacterial exposure in the laboratory, AQ listed the wrong insurance carrier when David filed for Workers Compensation benefits (when finally realizing he had gotten sick in the Agraquest workplace upon Histoplasma being discovered in his blood serum at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Three months after David started his position at Agraquest the Company filed with the United States Patent office; United States Patent 6,004,774 which states, ""may be used to treat human fungal diseases in which the disseminated disease is a condida, for example, Aspergillus sp, Histoplasma and Tinea".

Four days after David told his supervisor he was sick [he'd been vomiting for days with purulent bloody pus draining from his nose] he clocked out and went directly to Immediate Care Medical Clinic [and was scheduled for major sinus surgery within 7 days] all four Agraquest scientist's that are listed on U.S. patent 6,004,774 started signing away their interest rights on this patent.

This does not include the perjury committed during the entire workers compensation process by an Agraquest founding scientist and a former Agraquest employee, who is now working for the founder and CEO, Pam Marrone at her new start-up biotech company, Marrone Bio Innovations (formerly Marrone Organic Innovations" in Davis, CA.,

David Bell HAS NOT received ANY workers compensation what-so-ever. The above are just a small portion that happened to David in reference to your statement, "The workers comp system is working just fine in California".

NO, the workers compensation system is NOT working just fine in California nor in any other state as a matter of fact. I don't know if you are an attorney, you work for Agraquest or you work in the biotechnology arena, however NOT ALL biotechnology laboratories are compliant with Federal and/or state mandated laws with regard to biosafety. Look on the internet and you will find numerous concerns about this very issue as recently as September 30, 2009... and that is coming from the GAO [Government Accountability Office] in Washington D.C.; just to name only one.

To your comment, "No where has Mr Bell spoken he is the one injured yet he does not speak out there fore it appears the first poster is correct Ms Trend is seeking and using the By Proxy of Maunchausen to get attention she needs to find a life[.]" I believe you should watch the following video's as again, you are wrong. And FYI, it is believed the post/comment you have referred to was written by Pam Marrone's husband, Michael (Mick) J Rogers. (If I am incorrect in my assumption I sincerely apologize to Mr. Rogers.)

"Injured Agraquest Biotech Worker David Bell Tells His Story":
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=2567912703426192318&ei=Hi7MSu7iJJu4qAPIqNCbBg&q=%22david+bell%22&hl=en#

"KDRT 95.7 PODCAST - OCTOBER 22, 2008 Interviewer: David Greenwald, Guests: David Bell, Doug Haney & Sandi Trend (Mother of Injured Worker, David Bell)"
http://peoplesvanguard.com/DavisVanguard20081022.mp3

Workers Comp, The Destruction Of Ca-OSHA/EPA And The Case Of David Bell:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-

"Injured Workers Mother Charges Fraud At CA Fraud Commission" [9/9/2009]
http://ttabvue.uspto.gov/ttabvue/v?pno=91183344&pty=OPP&eno=13

"Injured Worker's Mother Charges Workers Comp Fraud At CA Fraud Assessment Commission" [6/17/2009]

You may also wish to read only a few articles written:
-"California Aggie Covers Issue of Agraquest; Yolo County Health Discounts Health Concerns"
-"The Vanguard's Article on AgraQuest Provokes Strong Response from Both County Health Director and Building Owner"
-"Did Congressman Lungren Ignore Potential National Security Threat Posed by AgraQuest's Importation of Foreign Soils?"
-"Did Davis Biotech Firm Expose Davis to Potentially Dangerous Pathogens?"
http://davisvanguard.blogspot.com/search/label/David%20Bell

~The above in in no way a complete accounting of the numerous video's, audio's and article's about David Bell and his workplace exposure at Agraquest.~
by JL
Wednesday Oct 7th, 2009 6:48 PM
I would like to comment on Ms. Trend's story. I commend her for her determination and knowledge on the subject of biotechnology. She has done her research and knows what she is talking about. The unfortunate illness her son has been experiencing is real and could have easily been avoided with some honest oversight at the workplace. He is suffering needlessly because of the greed of people like Pam Marrone. To add to his grief, the workman's comp agency allowed fraud and conspiracy to then cheat David out of what is rightfully his. The workman's comp is a disgrace and does little to accommodate the needs of the workers. What a shame!
As for Bonnie Smith and her knowledge? What can I say except you, Bonnie, need to study up on a subject before you state what you infer to be facts!

JL
In my COMMENT TO BONNIE SMITH, t I mistakenly left out the video link to:

"Injured Worker's Mother Charges Workers Comp Fraud At CA Fraud Assessment Commission" [6/17/2009]”

This can be found at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHlqrUxhtfQ
6/17/2009, "Injured Worker's Mother Charges Workers Comp Fraud At CA Fraud Assessment Commission"
VIDEO LINK: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHlqrUxhtfQ&NR=1

*Transcription of video (with screenshots of the evidentiary documentation) given to the DOI, Workers Compensation Fraud Commission gives the viewer & reader detailed information as to the overwhelming evidence the DOI, Sacramento & Yolo County District Attorney's, Workers' Compensation Fraud Units have and continue to ignore.

TRANSCRIPTION OF TESTIMONY WITH DOCUMENTS:
http://www.biotechawareness.com/images/SandiDOI_6.17.09VIDEOtranscript.pdf
VIDEO LINK: Injured Workers Mother Charges Fraud On 9/9/2009 At CA Fraud Commission
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QqZWhu9ANq8&NR=1

Transcription of video (WITH SCREENSHOT OF THE EVIDENTUARY DOCUMENTATION) given to the DOI, Workers Compensation Fraud Commission; gives the viewer & reader detailed information as to the overwhelming evidence the DOI, Sacramento & Yolo County District Attorney's, and the Workers' Compensation system have__ and continue to ignore their judicial duties to uphold MANDATED Federal and sate laws to protect the American worker, and have further protected Agraquest, and it's representatives; Liberty Mutual and Attorney Daniel Reick in the continual cover-up of fraud and concealment committed against David Bell and the direct connection to Agraquest and David Bell's overwhelming evidence as to the research and developemnt biotechnology causing his continual health decline as the result of exposure to unknow bacteria and fungus.

TRANSCRIPTION OF TESTIMONY OF THE VIDEO, WITH DOCUMENTS:
http://www.biotechawareness.com/images/9.9.09SandiTRANSCRIPTIONwDOCUMENTATION.pdf
COMMENT:
Posted 10/08/2009 11:47PM by Anonymous

Munchausen Syndrome is a crack pot diagnosis and you know that Mr. Michael J., self proclaimed psychologist to the world.

My blood work shows an impaired immune system with Total IgG levels at only 15 percent normal level. So how do you explain that as being a psychiatric condition?

Three liters of saline rinse was prescribed treatment so maybe you should take that up with the treating physician since you don’t have an MD license.

Perhaps you want to see the dozens of containers for the Amphotericin B, Wilson’s Solution, Itraconazole, Ketoconazole, Miconazole, Levaquin, Tequin, Omnicef and many others.

This article does not mention over two [CORRECTION; THREE] years of getting 8 hour IVIG infusions at the Sutter Cancer Center or the four sinus surgeries.

You can defend YOUR WIFE all you want Michael J. but the evidence still exists to spite how many website you try to push your Munchausen crap on. I will remind you Michael J. there is no statute of limitations on fraud.

http://www.newsreview.com/sacramento/content?oid=870890
The reader is urged to read the recent articles that have come out of New Zealand about people getting sick from the spraying of Agraquest's Bacillus Subtilis QST 713, SERENADE MAX.... And OF COURSE, I expect Pam Marrone's husband, Michael (Mick) J Rogers to once again come to the defense of his wife, Pamela Marrone, founder of Agraquest.

Spraying sets back safety progress
http://www.bayofplentytimes.co.nz

Our View: Residents rightly angered by spray
http://www.bayofplentytimes.co.nz

Spraying sets back safety progress
http://www.bayofplentytimes.co.nz

Drifting orchard spray deemed hazardous
http://www.bayofplentytimes.co.nz

When searching the United States Patent Office for the search terms of "Agraquest" and "mutants" the results were twenty (20) United States patents; that were assigned to Agraquest alone and furthermore does not take into account International patents. These patents uses the wording; "mutants", "mutants thereof" and/or "recombinant techniques". There are many MANY more patents that don’t list Agraquest as the holder of the patent; but Agraquest scientists were listed as “inventors” on other company patents.

The reader is invited; NO… encouraged to search for themselves on the USPTO website for the search terms of “mutants”, “mutants thereof” and/or "recombinant" and decide for themselves whether we can be 100% certain that only "naturally found in the environment" bacteria and/or fungus is being used on our food crops, ornamentals and/or used for insect control…. OR ARE MUTANTS BEING USED?

We are very aware that the biotech industry is deeply involved in Obama's administration; Monsanto's Tom Vilsack as the USDA Chief and Islam A. Siddiqui as chief agricultural negotiator in the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), with the rank of ambassador. Prior to this; Siddiqui served in various capacities in the Clinton Administration at US Department of Agriculture (USDA) as under secretary for marketing and regulatory programs, senior trade advisor to Secretary Dan Glickman and Deputy Under Secretary for marketing and regulatory programs; Siddiqui has also served on the US Department of Commerce's Industry Trade Advisory Committee on Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Health/Science Products & Services, which advises the US Secretary of Commerce and USTR on international trade issues related to these sectors. Before joining the USDA, Siddiqui spent 28 years with the California Department of Food and Agriculture. Siddiqui WAS in Davis, California.

Even Congress has sold us out when it come to microorganisms being used on our food and for insect control. It makes me wonder just how many of them have stock in the biotech companies.

During the 7 session of the 2006 workshop; "Regulatory and Commercialization Of Microbial Biopesticides; Microbial Biopesticides and Transgenic Insects - Enhancing Regulatory Communication"; which presentations were given by USDA, APHIS, EPA, several universities as well as numerous biotech companies, including Pam Marrone.

Marrone's presentation; Session 4: "Regulation and impacts on microbial biopesticides; Impact of regulatory activity on emerging companies" Marrone made it very clear there was congressional influence in getting her product Serenade approved by the EPA:
PAM MARRONE QUOTE: “OK, Serenade took 20 months for registration, actually that seems fast to me now, but at the time...where was I? I started up the company in ‘95, I raised my first venture capital in ‘97, submitted the package for Serenade in ‘98 ... 2000 it still wasn't approved, investor's were on my tail. I raised 20 million at that point. Investor's were hounding me, they thought I was incompetent and what's going on? And so, finally what they [investor's] did was they called their congress people on their own to rattle around and put pressure on the agency, actually it’s counter productive to do... to do that actually, but in this case I couldn’t hold back my investors there was…. they [investor's] were the money people and that's just the way it was."

Marrone is shown on the video footage laughing about the issue's she had with the biological fungicide, Burkholderia cepacia (bacterium).

In 2000 the CDC intervened and this Burkholderia cepacia biofungicides was discontinued because of the links with lung infections in persons suffering from cystic fibrosis. I find it most disturbing when finding the publication, "Evaluation of Trichoderma vireos and Burkholderia cepacia for antagonistic activity against root-know nematode, Meloidogyne incognito" that 3 scientist with the UDDA and ARS were involved.

I find it inexcusable that Pam Marrone is at it again in her company; Marrone Bio Innovations in using Burkholderia again in the use of this bacterium in bioinsecticides. What about the cystic fibrosis people?
JUDICIAL DECEPTION IN CALIFORNIA WORKER COMPENSATION COURTS:

During Bell’s workers compensation ‘trial ‘The presiding Judge (SUZANNE F. Dugan); did not recuse herself as she should have; because of “bias” and/or “appearance of bias” when her husband; Michael T. Dugan had direct ties to Agraquest. READ the Sacramento Bee, October 4, 2009 article - Second Act - Michael T Dugan "Michael Dugan of Shingle Springs consulted state government agencies on water issues for the Florida-based engineering firm PBS&J the past four years until he and others were laid off in June." (**This conflict of interest and bias by Judge Suzanne F. Dugan was not discovered until 2010). READ Michael (T.) Dugan of Shingle Springs contribution for Obama for America in (2008). "Employer/Occupation - Pbs&J/Consultant-Attorney"

California workers' compensation Judge Suzanne F. Dugan went so far as to say in her November 21, 2007 REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION on Bell's MOTION/PETITION FOR RECONSIDERATION; "Applicant did not challenge me at that time nor before he received his decision. I had no knowledge about the facts of the case before the trial" and "I have no personal bias about the parties of the case."

**VALIDATION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST & BIAS BY CALIFORNIA WORKERS' COMPENSATION JUDGE IN THE CASE OF DAVID BELL vs AGRAQUEST, INC:

Judge Suzanne F. Dugan presided over Bell's workers compensation 'trial' on September 10, 2007 (Dugan's order on October 12, 2007 was that DAVID BELL did not sustain a workplace injury/illness at AGRAQUEST, INC and he was to receive nothing on his workers' compensation claim).

**SUZANNE F. DUGAN'S HUSBAND HAD "FIVE DIRECT TIES" TO AGRAQUEST BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER she heard the case of DAVID BELL vs AGRAQUEST, INC ; PBS&J Corporation, Agraquest, Agraquest's law firm of Morrison and Foerster and Agraquest's founder and CEO, Pamela Gail Marrone, company; Marrone Organic Innovations:

Judge Suzanne F. Dugan's husband, Michael T. Dugan was employed by the company, PBS&J Corporation, on the date of October 4, 2007. Michael Dugan's employer, PBS&J Corporation "CO-SPONSORED" the University of California - Davis's Explorit Science Center's 16th annual Science Fair and Silent Auction - with Agraquest, Agraquest's United States Securities and Exchange and "patent" law firm; Morrison and Foerster, and Agraquest's founder; Pam Marrone's 3rd start-up biotech company in Davis, Marrone Organic Innovations [later re-named Marrone Bio Innovations]. **Not only were all four co-sponsors of the October 4, 2007 event; they provided "teams" for participation in the events held that day. READ EXPLORIT SCIENCE CENTER WEEKLY COLUMN; DATE OCTOBER 19, 2007 HERE

***It should be noted that Bell had written to Christopher Russell; of the law firm of Morrison and Foerster in February 2000 and had requested a copy of his employee file, for his review, per his legal rights under California law. READ BELL LETTER TO RUSSELL. David did not receive a copy of his Agraquest employee file until 2004 when a subpoena was issued for it's release.)

FOR VALIDATION PLEASE GO TO http://issuu.com/biotechharm/docs/finaldbtimeline_wc.corruption

You will be able to "click" on the actual documents to support this CORRUPTION on the above link; merely adjust to suitable screen size by adjusting the upper left hand corner button and "click" on the document you wish to view.

ISN'T IT ODD THAT "DEFROCKED JUDGE", MICHAEL T. DUGAN WAS SENT TO FEDERAL PRISON FOR FRAUD SURROUNDING INSURANCE and SUZANNE F. DUGAN FURTHER CARRIED THE TORCH TO THE CALIFORNIA WORKER'S COMPENSATION SYSTEM IN WHICH SHE PROTECTED THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY BY DENYING INJURED WORKERS THEIR RIGHTS TO COMPENSATION
FOR BEING HURT ON THE JOB AS IS MANDATED BY FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS?

READ
MICHAEL DUGAN'S APPEAL
18 F.3d 460: Michael T. Dugan, Ii, Petitioner-appellant, v. United States of America, Respondent-appellee
http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/F3/18/460/531288/

QUOTE:

"Michael Dugan, II, while serving as an Indiana state trial judge, was indicted in December 1988 for racketeering, mail fraud, wire fraud, extortion, bribery, tax fraud, and tax conspiracy charges. The evidence presented established that Dugan appointed his friends as receivers and appraisers in cases pending before him and thereafter "demanded" cash kickbacks for every receivership and appraisal fee Dugan authorized. In addition to the kickback arrangements, the evidence demonstrated that Dugan extorted payments from executives of Underwriters National Assurance Company ("Underwriters"), a troubled insurance company which was the subject of a rehabilitation lawsuit pending in Dugan's court for ten years. Dugan used his supervisory powers to select or approve Underwriters's chairmen of the boards of trustees and directors and the company's presidents, marketing managers, and legal counsel, made clear in United States v. Dugan, 902 F.2d 585, 587 (7th Cir.1990), where we stated that "[h]e also fixed the compensation levels for these individuals, drafted their employment or agency contracts, [and] ... fired executives when they displeased him[.]" Robert Eichholtz, Dugan's close friend and Underwriters's chairman of the boards of directors and of the trustees, was Dugan's co-conspirator. Eichholtz stated to David Phipps and James Riggs, two Underwriters executives, that he was paying Dugan to keep his position and that they would also be required to make contributions or payments if they wished to retain their positions. Over a nine year period, Dugan extorted $190,000 from Underwriters executives by inflating their salaries in order that they might make kickback payments to him to retain their jobs.
(PAGE 4)

Nancy Eichholtz, a government witness, testified that her husband Robert Eichholtz (recently deceased) made monthly payments of $1,000 to Dugan, and that her husband had told her that others were also giving Dugan money. Neither Dugan nor the prosecution questioned Mrs. Eichholtz about two agreements she had made with the prosecution to testify against Dugan.1 Mrs. Eichholtz's agreements with the United States Attorney's office were included in the government's exhibits and its admissibility was stipulated to by both parties before trial.
(PAGE 5)

The jury convicted Dugan of racketeering, extortion, and mail, wire, and tax fraud and the court sentenced him to eighteen years in prison. As part of his sentence, Dugan was also ordered to make restitution and to forfeit certain property interests derived from his racketeering activity. Dugan appealed, "argu[ing] that he was denied his right to confront witnesses guaranteed by the sixth amendment because crucial statements of an unavailable co-conspirator were admitted. Specifically, he maintains that statements of Robert Eichholtz, who died prior to trial, were crucial to the case against him and lacked adequate indicia of reliability." Dugan, 902 F.2d at 589. He also contended that the evidence presented at trial was insufficient to support his conviction for mail fraud because the government, as required under McNally v. United States, 483 U.S. 350, 107 S.Ct. 2875, 97 L.Ed.2d 292 (1987), failed to establish that his scheme resulted in the loss of property, expectation of a property right, or other concrete economic interest. This court affirmed his convictions after concluding that because Mr. Eichholtz was Dugan's co-conspirator, Mr. Eichholtz's statements were admissible under the co-conspirator provisions of Federal Rule of Evidence 801(d)(2)(E) and that "where a statement is admissible under Rule 801(d)(2)(E), there can be no Confrontation Clause violation." Dugan, 902 F.2d at 590 (quoting United States v. Shoffner, 826 F.2d 619, 630 n. 14 (7th Cir.), cert. denied Strange v. United States, 484 U.S. 958, 108 S.Ct. 356, 98 L.Ed.2d 381 (1987)). We also rejected Dugan's sufficiency of the evidence argument because the evidence was "overwhelming" that Dugan's actions resulted in the loss of property, expectation of a property right, or other concrete economic interest. Dugan, 902 F.2d at 591.2
(PAGE 6)

On March 23, 1992, Dugan filed a motion pursuant to 28 U.S.C. Sec. 2255 and requested an evidentiary hearing on the motion. Dugan alleged inter alia 1) that the prosecution failed to disclose the agreements it had reached with Nancy Eichholtz, in contravention of Brady v. Maryland, 373 U.S. 83, 83 S.Ct. 1194, 10 L.Ed.2d 215 (1963), and 2) that he had received ineffective assistance of trial counsel because of his attorney's failure to object to the introduction of hearsay statements, letters from Mr. Eichholtz, and failure to cross-examine Mrs. Eichholtz regarding her agreement with the government. Dugan failed to raise either of these claims on direct appeal. The district court after review found that the prosecution had fully disclosed its agreements with Mrs. Eichholtz. With regard to Dugan's ineffectiveness allegation, the court found that "considering the particular nature of the specifications of ineffectiveness ... Dugan's claim of ineffective assistance of trial counsel could have, and should have been raised on [direct] appeal." Notwithstanding Dugan's waiver for failure to raise his ineffective assistance of counsel allegations on direct appeal, the district judge addressed and rejected Dugan's claims on the merits, concluding that "by every measure known to this judge, Dugan's trial was eminently fair; it certainly was not flawed by deficient performance of counsel, especially in light of the fact that Dugan, himself a lawyer and a judge, was present and fully participated in his own defense throughout the trial." The court denied Dugan's Sec. 2255 motion and refused his request for an evidentiary hearing.
(PAGE 7)


by Strend
Tuesday Jan 22nd, 2013 10:59 PM
The following bacteria and fungi have been identified in David Bell's cultures of his sinuses, sputum, nose and/or tested from positive to HIGH POSITIVE in IgG MAST tests. ALL of these microorganisms are related to his occupational exposure at Agraquest in Davis, California.

4+Acinetobater - Sourse Sinus
Acremonium species - Source Sputum
Curvularia - Source Sinus
Penicillium - Source Sputum + HIGH POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Pseudomonas - Source Numerous
Staph - Source Numerous
Rare mucus - Source Urinalysis
Histoplasma - Source Blood Serum
Alternaria - Source POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Aspergillus - Source POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Botrytis - Source POSITIVE
Cladosporium -Source HIGH POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Eppicoccum - Source POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Fusarium - Source HIGH POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Helminthosporium - Source HIGH POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Mucor - Source POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Pullularia - Source POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Rhizopus - Source POSITIVE IgG MAST testing
Stemphylium - Source POSITIVE IgG MAST testing

To view the list and see the Agraquest Connections please see CROSS-OVER INFECTIONS FROM BIOLAB
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/21733928/CROSS-OVER-INFECTIONS-FROM-BIOLAB


The fungus; histoplasma capsulateum; which causes the human disease histoplasmosis, was identified in David Bell's blood serum by the Mayo Clinic laboratory in Rochester, Minnesota.

Although Agraquest denied any and all connections to histoplasma being related to David Bell's employment with the company; it was discovered that four (4) days after David Bell became ill on January 18, 1999, the Agraquest scientists on Pam Marrone's United States Patent 6,004,774 began signing away their interest rights on this patent. The patent states, "Additionally, an antifungal composition comprising an extract produced by B. subtilis strain ATCC 55614 may be used to treat human fungal diseases in which the disseminated disease propagule is a conidia, for example, Aspergillus sp., HISTOPLASMA sp., and Tinea sp."
Documents are provided below (all images enlarge):

HISTOPLASMA & DAVID BELL's MEDICAL RELATED TO AGRAQUEST WORKPLACE/LAB
http://www.biotechawareness.com/index~option~com_content~view~article~id~239.php
DISCOVERED IN 2012:

The Oomycetes California strain of Lagenidium giganteum, as is stated in Agraquest's United States Patent # 5,691,191, "Medium for the cultivation of lagenidium giganteum" is the "active ingredient" in Agraquest's product's of Laginex (Laginex as & Technical Laginex) did not belong to Agraquest solely; in fact, the California Department of Health Services was the co-registrant with Agraquest. Read EPA document→ HERE;[See - VII. Registrant Information: “California Department of Health Services Agraquest, Inc. DCDC/Vector-borne Disease Section c/o Technology Sciences Group, Inc.]”

To Read More and view documents; see THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA'S INVOLVEMENT IN THE LAGENIDIUM GIGANTEUM THAT DAVID BELL WAS EXPOSED TO DAILY AT AGRAQUEST
http://www.biotechawareness.com/index~option~com_content~view~article~id~238.php
Please see the front page of http://www.biotechawareness.com for links to the fungus; lagenidium giganteum (Bell's project that he was hired for). The state of California Department of Health was the co-registrant with Agraquest on lagenidium giganteum.

Strange isn't it; that when Bell FINALLY realized it was Agraquest that infected him, he sent Agraquest a Workers Compensation claim form to fill out (they put the wrong insurance carrier down). This was on October 3, 2003. Now we find out that the state of California Department of Health SIGNED OFF as being a registrant with Agraquest on October 24, 2003. Twenty one (21) days after Agraquest received the WC claim form.