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"Double Talker" SF Charter Supporter Jane Kim's Guest Antonio Villaraigosa
by Labor Video Project
Sunday May 27th, 2018 10:47 AM
Supervisor Jane Kim invited former LA mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to attend her campaign rally on 8/30/18 where he denied that he was corrupt and taking money from the billionaires.
kim___.jpg
Former LA mayor Antonio Villaraigosa came to San Francisco on 8/30/16 to attend a campaign rally for San Francisco supervisor Jane Kim who was running for the State Assembly. He argued that he was against corruption and not beholden to the billionaires. He is now taking millions from the California Charter School Association CCSA and billionaires including Netflix CEO Reed Hastings, Eli Broad and the Walmart Walton family.

Gavin Newsom who is supported by the AFT, CTA and California AFL-CIO also supports “non-profit” charters which have also siphoned off billions from public education. The AFT/CFT NEA/CTA leadership support reforming charters and making “non-profit” charters more transparent.

For more media:

Weiner's Supporters Go Crazy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_1xxLF35fw

Sanders Betrays His "Revolution"
http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/06/03/has-sanders-betrayed-his-revolution-by-endorsing-jane-kim/

Letter To CCSA
https://tultican.com/2018/05/26/open-letter-to-the-california-charter-schools-association/

Charter Billionaires Backing Villaragosas
https://edsource.org/2018/charter-school-backing-for-villaraigosas-gubernatorial-bid-grows/596854

Controversy In Boyle Heights
https://capitalandmain.com/co-location-controversy-in-boyle-heights

Production of Labor Video Project
http://www.laborvideo.org

Charter school backing for Villaraigosa's gubernatorial bid grows
https://edsource.org/2018/charter-school-backing-for-villaraigosas-gubernatorial-bid-grows/596854

ELECTIONS
APRIL 26, 2018

LOUIS FREEDBERG

MIKHAIL ZINSHTEYN/EDSOURCE

Former Los Angeles Mayor and 2018 gubernatorial candidate Antonio Villaraigosa shares a light moment during an interview with moderator Michele Siqueiros, president of the Campaign for College Opportunity
Supporters of charter school expansion continue to pour funds to boost the bid of Antonio Villaraigosa to succeed California Gov. Jerry Brown at a critical point in the former Los Angeles mayor’s campaign,

This week philanthropist Eli Broad contributed another $1 million to a pro-Villaraigosa charter-sponsored independent expenditure committee, bringing his total contribution to $2.5 million over the past two weeks. A day later, Michael Bloomberg donated $1.5 million to the same committee. Both are multi-billionaires, with Bloomberg’s net worth is estimated to be $50.5 billion and Broad’s at $7.3 billion.

Bloomberg has been a long-time backer of charter schools including contributing to an unsuccessful ballot initiative in Massachusetts to lift a cap on charter schools there.

These contributions came on top of a $7 million contribution by Reed Hastings, the founder and CEO of Netflix, $1 million from Richard Riordan, another former LA mayor, and $750,000 this week from Alice Walton. Walton, a staunch charter school supporter, is the daughter of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton. Forbes magazine estimates her net worth to be nearly $42 billion, and Hasting’s $3.5 billion.

This brings contributions from only 5 individuals to $12.75 million this month. All the funds went to an independent expenditure committeeestablished by Charter Schools Association of California Advocates, the political advocacy arm of the association representing most of the nearly 1,300 charter schools in California.

Meanwhile, according to the latest California Secretary of State reports for the period Jan. 1 through April 21, the California Nurses Association has contributed $1.2 million to an independent expenditure committee to support front runner Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom.

Independent expenditure committees can back a candidate as long as they don’t coordinate their activities with him or her. There is no limit on the amount that can be contributed to a committee while direct contributions to a candidate’s campaign are capped at $29,200.

In total direct campaign contributions, the Secretary of State reports that Newsom, with $17.6 million in his coffers through April 21, is far ahead of Villaraigosa’s $7.1 million. Over the past quarter, Newsom raised $4.6 million in direct contributions, compared to Villaraigosa’s $2.4 million.

The next few weeks will be crucial for Villaraigosa to have any shot at the governor’s post. Broad’s contribution came on the same day as the release of the UC Berkeley IGS poll, which shows Villaraigosa far behind Newsom, and being outpolled by two Republican contenders, Assemblyman Travis Allen and businessman John Cox.

Newsom is backed by 30 percent of likely voters, while Cox and Allen are backed by 18 percent and 16 percent, respectively. That contrasts with the 9 percent backing for Villaraigosa, 7 percent for State Treasurer John Chiang and 4 percent for former State Superintendent of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin. The online poll was through a random sample of voters reached via emails listed on voter registration rolls.

Why this is important is that under California’s extremely unusual primary system, the two top vote-getters in the June 5 primary, regardless of party affiliation, will go on to face each other in the November general election.

The fight for Villaraigosa’s backers over the next six weeks will be to bolster his support so he comes in at least second and can then go head to head with the other top vote-getter, presumably Newsom, in November.

That will be a tough assignment, said Mark DiCamillo, director of the Berkeley IGS Poll. Until recently, Villaraigosa was running neck and neck with the Republican candidates. But in recent weeks many formerly undecided voters have made up their minds, especially on the Republican side where they are gravitating to either Allen or Cox.

“Before it was a pitched battle between himself (Villaraigosa) and the Republicans,” said DiCamillo. “Now it’s a coming from behind.”

DiCamillo is also predicting that less than half the state’s registered voters will turn out for the June primary. That is likely to help the Republican contenders, and put Villairagosa at a disadvantage. “In low turnout elections, the least likely to vote are ethnic voters, young voters and less educated voters, and those are likely to make up more of Villaraigosa’s constituency,” he said.

He also pointed out that in the poll results, Villaraigosa is the only leading gubernatorial candidate who has a higher negative rating than a positive one. “Newsom is in a much stronger position with fellow Democrats than he was in December,” DiCamillo said. “Democrats have come home, and feel more positively about Newsom.”

Part of what is driving the big money, pro-charter contributions to Villaraigosa is that Newsom has been endorsed by the California Teachers Association and other teachers unions, whom charter advocates see as a threat to their further expansion in the state.

The CTA has launched a major campaign to promote more oversight and transparency in charter school operations, and the relationship between the union and the charter school sector is as bitter as it has been in the 25 years since the first charter school was founded. Newsom has not been an opponent of charter schools, although he is calling for more oversight and accountability in expenditure of state funds.

By contrast, Villaraigosa has been more closely allied with the charter school movement over a period of many years as well as being a harsh critic of teachers unions, both in Los Angeles and statewide.

In the latest campaign finance reports, the CTA last week contributed $4.6 million to an independent expenditure committee it established, but it is not known how those funds will be spent. The CTA typically contributes funds to a wide range of candidates and causes.

Dear Legislative Candidate:
The California Federation of Teachers (CFT) represents more than 100,000 educators from early childhood through university, in the public and private sectors.
Please complete and return questionnaire to: CFT Political Department, 1107 9th Street, Suite 460,
S a c r a m e n t o , C a l i f o r n i a 9 5 8 1 4 , A t t e n t i o n : A n g e l i c a V a r g a s , a n d e m a i l : ​a​v a r g a s @ c f t . o r g .​ ​F o r q u e s t i o n s , contact Kenneth Burt at (916) 446­2788.
The questionnaire will be used in conjunction with local candidate interviews to make recommendations for CFT endorsements.
Thank you.
LEGISLATIVE CANDIDATE QUESTIONAIRE 2016
Candidate Name: Jane Kim
District: AD ​_ Party: Democrat

S D 1​1
Current Occupation: Member, Board of Supervisors, District 6 Name of incumbent: Mark Leno
Campaign Website: http://www.janekim.org
Campaign Address: PO Box 113, San Francisco, 94104 Campaign Phone #:
Campaign Email: jane [at] janekim.org Campaign Manager:
Committee Name: Jane Kim for Senate 2016 Campaign I.D. #: 1380644
Consultant: Eric Jaye
District Voter Registration: Dem. 5​5% Rep. 8​% Independent ____ Counties in District: San Francisco,

SIGNATURE /​s/ Jane Kim DATE 1​1/30/15

Candidate Background
1. What public offices have you held?
Member, SF Board of Supervisors, District 6 (2011­present) Member and President, SF Board of Education (2007­2010)
2. Please attach a copy of your biography.
I currently serve on the Board of Supervisors, representing District 6, one of the most dynamic
and diverse districts in San Francisco, encompassing the Tenderloin, South of Market, Mid­Market/Civic Center, South Beach, Mission Bay, Rincon Hill, and Treasure Island/Yerba Buena Island neighborhoods. I am the first Korean­American elected official in San Francisco, and I have dedicated my career to serving our communities in San Francisco, starting as a Community Organizer at Chinatown Community Development Center, then as a Civil Rights Attorney at Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights, and as President of the San Francisco Board of Education.
I spent my first two years on the Board serving as Chair of the Rules Committee, making recommendations on dedicated residents who wanted to serve on our local oversight committees, and as a member of the Budget & Finance Committee, working with multiple stakeholders throughout the City to pass a values­based budget thoughtfully and responsibly.
I also serve as Chair of the City and School District Joint Select Committee. Public education is a passion of mine, and I continue to advocate for our children and youth. I want to ensure that we are increasing resources and dollars to our schools while supporting partnerships with the San Francisco Unified School District. I led the authorization and strengthening of the Public Education and Enrichment Fund, which allocated $81.76 million in critical City funding for school libraries, arts, sports, and music for fiscal year 2014­15. I am also currently working to ensure that a new public elementary school is built in Mission Bay, one of San Francisco’s newest and fastest growing neighborhoods with a growing population of young families, to help ensure that our families stay in our City.
In my second term, I have continued to fight for working families in San Francisco. I negotiated a major increase in the number of affordable housing units in the new Giants Mission Rock development, raising the threshold from 33% to 40% affordable housing and setting a new standard for city­supported developments. I have also worked to pass the boldest tenant protections to counter frivolous and profit­incentivized evictions.
Everyday, I feel fortunate to have this opportunity to serve ­­ I believe in public service and working to make local government policy processes and services accessible and engaging. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to do this work.I am honored to serve constituents in District 6, and I feel inclined to serve the greater Bay Area Region to maintain our progressive values.
3. CFT represents teachers, classified employees, community college professors, UC lecturers and librarians, and early childhood educators. What is your experience working with these groups? What, specifically, have you done to support these educator groups?
I have worked with these groups both as President of the San Francisco Board of Education and as District 6 Supervisor.
4. Have you ever been a union member? If yes, please name the union. Are you, or have you ever been, an officer in a union?
No
5. Is there anything in your background that is likely to prove embarrassing?
No
Why Are You Running?
1. What are your top three legislative priorities?
a. Education is a top priority in California and has been a central part of my policy and advocacy work. I was President of the Board of Education, and I currently serve as Chair of the City and School District Committee. I have led the way to ensure that San Francisco is increasing resources and money for its schools. Last year, I was the lead author of the Public Education Enrichment Fund (PEEF), which allocated $81.76 million in city funding for fiscal year 2014­2015. These funds have proven to be sound investments in our schools and youth. In the last decade, critical PEEF sports, libraries, arts and music funding has ensured that every San Francisco public school has a librarian, that regular professional development training occurs for visual arts and performance instructors (where before there was none), and that the number of professional training classes for athletics instructors has more than tripled. The general education portion of the Public Education Enrichment Fund has enabled the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) to triple the number of students enrolled in grades K­8 receiving individual and/or group health and mental health services through student support professionals over the past five years, with the number of high school students receiving five or more counseling sessions at the w e l l n e s s c e n t e r m o r e t h a n d o u b l i n g i n t h e l a s t 1 0 y e a r s​. I w o u l d l o v e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o c o n t i n u e t h i s work in Sacramento. If elected, I will work with stakeholders to identify all sources of funding in order to improve public schools statewide­­especially schools that disproportionately serve students with great needs. In addition, it is crucial we restore tax equity by amending tax loopholes like proposition 13 and protecting laws that provide school funding proposition 30 and 98. Furthermore, we must continue improving our education system in order to close the achievement and opportunity gap. These improvements can be made by nurturing the role of charter schools in our system, protecting the due process rights of our educators, and eliminating the voucher program and reinvesting those funds back into our public schools. These are some of the ways we can progress towards a more improved public school system. We have a responsibility to invest in the education and success of our youth. California currently ranks 46th in per pupil spending­­with only Texas, Nevada, Idaho and Arizona trailing behind­­and that is unacceptable.
b. I have been the strongest proponent for acquiring and building affordable housing on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. I challenged San Francisco to make the City more affordable by setting the goal that 33% of all new housing that is built should be affordable for low­ and middle­income households. In addition, I established the forward thinking standard that 40% of housing that is built on public land should be affordable to these same households. Most recently, I negotiated with the San Francisco Giants to achieve this goal on one of the largest vacant public parcels remaining, getting the Giants to increase the percentage of affordable housing from 33% to an unprecedented 40%. 54% of all
of San Francisco’s affordable housing is being built in the district that I represent. Furthermore, I have stood up for tenant’s rights, passing the boldest tenant protections ordinance in the country to counter frivolous and profit­incentivized evictions.
c. In addition to building more affordable housing, addressing homelessness is one of my top legislative priorities. After personally going through the shelter reservation process and spending a night at one of our shelters, I have been pushing for a greater public health focus in addressing chronic homelessness. I worked with the Department of Public Health to complete a mental health assessment of all shelter residents and conduct homeless outreach to shelter residents in night. I funded four full­time nurses to rove our shelters and the opening of a 24 hour medical shelter for homeless residents who are sick on our streets.
My legislative priority for the upcoming year is to address housing homeless children and their families. We have a limited window of opportunity to end the cycle of poverty for the next generation, and it must include stable, safe, and clean housing. If we do not address this now, we guarantee that the homeless child today suffers chronic homelessness and intransigent poverty as an adult. I am actively partnering with the mayor as well as experts in the arena of housing, finance, and family homelessness to fully implement a roadmap to end the family homelessness by 2019.
I have been a leading voice to close the income gap. Last year, I authored the ballot measure to increase San Francisco’s minimum wage to $15/hour. This is the strongest minimum wage ordinance in the country and was passed overwhelmingly by San Francisco voters in November 2014.​Furthermore, I authored a tax exclusion legislation to attract technology companies and small businesses in a corridor in my district with the highest commercial vacancy rate in San Francisco in 2011. The commercial vacancy rate has fallen as low as 2.4% in most parts of my district and this corridor is now home to Twitter, Uber, Square, Dolby, and Zendesk. I am committed to creating good paying/family wage jobs, so that diverse residents can continue to live in the Bay Area.
2. What are your top priorities for California’s public education system?
See above.
3. What resources and programs will you advance to support these priorities?
In order to have effective policies and programs, we must ensure our legislation is enforceable
and has adequate funding. I will support programs that aid the development of our education system like expanding after school programs and universal preschool, increasing the number of qualified professionals including teachers and counselors, protecting due process rights of educators and increasing professional development programs. In order to ensure we have sufficient funding we must at the very least fix the tax loopholes and maintain state funding of our public schools.
4. Will you meet with CFT representatives and local educators in the district when requested to discuss pending legislation and other issues of concern?
Absolutely.
5. Are there any educators currently involved in your campaign? If yes, who?
Yes, several educators and education advocates have endorsed my campaign and are actively supporting my campaign.
Labor
1. Do you support collective bargaining for teachers, classified employees, professors and early childhood educators?
Yes, collective bargaining allows the opportunity for our educators and faculty to have a voice in defining the terms of their contract and it may prevent potential disputes.
2. Do you support collective bargaining for workers in the private sector?
Yes, our workers should be able to negotiate their contract regardless of which sector they work in.
3. Do you support the right of unions to participate in state and local politics?
Yes, unions have played a historical role in shaping our nation’s policies and laws and I support their right to continue to do so.
4. Do you support Project Labor Agreements for school and college districts, cities and other government bodies?
Y es.
5. Do you support teaching labor history in the schools?
Y es.
6. Have you completed a questionnaire from the California Labor Federation? If not, do you plan to?
I have not completed a questionnaire from the california Labor Federation, but I intend on doing so.
Early Childhood Education
1. Do you support expanding early childhood education?
Yes, every child should be well prepared to enter the first grade and studies have shown that children who do not have a head start are at a disadvantage­­these students tend to be children that have
the greatest needs (learning disabilities, low income, English learners, etc.)
2. Do you support early childhood educators having a voice in the work place through unionization that would allow for greater professionalization?
Yes
3. Do you have a proposal for increased funding?
I do not have a proposal for increased funding; however, I look forward to working with our stakeholders including legislators, unions, education policy experts, and the governor to identify all sources of increased funding so that our schools can once again rank among the nation’s best.
K­12 Education
1. Do you support the goal of increasing per pupil funding to the average of the ten highest states?
Absolutely.
2. Do you oppose merit pay/pay for performance for teachers?
Yes, test scores should be used to improve learning and instruction, not as a bargaining tool for
teacher compensation.
3. Do you oppose tax credits and vouchers for sending children to private schools?
Yes. As a former member and President of the Board of Education, public education continues to be a top priority. I​raised the profile of this issue when I introduced a $2.2 million one­time appropriation to backfill state education cuts and provide additional classes to 2,000 San Francisco sophomores and juniors who were at risk of not graduating under new higher standards set by SFUSD. The Board of Supervisors approved funding, however only $1.4 million ended up being allocated after the Mayor line­item vetoed $843,000 of the package. While we were disappointed that we could not fund the entire credit recovery program, the proposal led to a much larger conversation about the value of funding our public schools. That year, the City committed to fully funding the Public Education Enrichment Fund for the first time in 4 years and released $1.5 million in Rainy Day Funds in order to help stem teacher layoff.​Rather than giving families vouchers to send their children to whatever private schools they choose, we should invest that money back into our public schools, and bring them all up to the same level.
4. What is your position on charter schools?
Charter schools serve as an important space where minority students and low­income communities may receive education that is critical for gaining skill and knowledge. Not limited to serving any specific community, charter schools are also essential for talented students that excel in any given area to receive the continued training that is essential for their growth. Offering an alternative environment for students, charter schools serve as a necessary option for education by integrating both characteristics of a public and private schools.
I have supported existing charter schools reauthorizations in San Francisco that have demonstrated successful outcomes for students and I have voted against new charter authorizations, many of whom do not have a track record of success. I support successful schools with thriving classrooms that include teachers and other educators in the decision making process. I will support legislation to enhance local school boards’ ability to deny charter applications to make charters more transparent in providing data concerning suspensions and expulsions of students. As stated in my previous answer above, I support alternatives to suspensions and believe that keeping students in schools and helping them graduate is imperative for keeping them out of jails and prisons and off of the streets. I look forward to working with CFT and other educational policy organizations on this issue.
5. What is your position on using student test scores to evaluate teachers?
I don’t believe student test scores are an accurate measure of a teacher’s effectiveness in the classroom. Each student enters the classroom with a unique set of abilities and challenges, which affects test scores, regardless of the teacher’s effectiveness. In addition, it often leads to teaching to maximize test scores, which often leads to memorization.
6. Do you support “just cause” and “due process” in the discipline process for educators?
Yes, I support “just cause” and “due process” for educators, just as I believe in “just cause” and “due process” in the discipline of all citizens. Educators’ actions should be fully evaluated before discliplinary action is taken against them.
7. Do you support maintaining and expanding career and technical education for all students?
Yes, I support maintaining and expanding career and technical education for all students because all students should have equal access to a variety of educational opportunities.
8. Do you support social programs that help students come prepared to learn? Please explain.
Yes, I support social programs that help students come prepared to learn.
1 out of every 25 San Francisco public school students is homeless — facing daily sleep deprivation, anxiety, hunger, and lack of access to clean clothing, showers, or basic toiletries. Based on Compass Connecting Point data, there are enough homeless students in San Francisco schools to fill more than 70 classrooms or 35 Muni buses. They are our neighbors, our children’s classmates, and they are struggling.
In 2012­13, less than half of homeless students tested met California state proficiency standards in reading, math and science. Nationally, half of homeless children are held back one grade, and more than 1 of 5 homeless children is held back for multiple grades. Homelessness is associated with an 87 percent increased likelihood of dropping out of school.
The physical, mental and emotional effects of homelessness on children are well­documented and devastating. Homeless children are sick four times as often as their peers with stable homes. They are much more likely to go hungry, exhibit emotional or behavioral issues, or be exposed to violence and debilitating stress. And homeless children are five times more likely than their peers to become homeless as adults, according to a study by the Brookings Institution. H​ousing homeless families and making sure
that they have access to nutritious meals, tutoring, and vocational training are crucial for helping homeless children escape homelessness as they become adults.
This is a problem with solutions. For the first time this school year, SFUSD partnered with Hamilton Family Center to train teachers and staff to identify homeless students, and help families that are homeless or at risk of homelessness to find or maintain housing. The program, funded through a grant from Google, developed a first­of­its­kind emergency hotline that has already assisted more than 100 SFUSD families in crisis since December. While it seems obvious, this is the first time the city and SFUSD have forged a meaningful partnership to address this crisis. The initial results demonstrate that this seemingly unsolvable problem can be successfully resolved.
We recently took additional important steps to reduce family homelessness, including opening up units in public housing to homeless families, increasing eviction­prevention counseling, and funding rent subsidies. A number of leading community organizations, including the Coalition on Homelessness and Hamilton Family Center, have drafted a comprehensive five­year p​lan to end family homelessness.​The plan calls for the city to set aside 176 units in the housing pipeline for homeless families, increase funding for eviction defense, and targeted support for housing stabilization. This plan will cost $11 million over five years — a mere 0.1 percent of the city’s growing $8 billion annual budget and a small investment to make to end family homelessness for children.
9. Do you support bringing back nurses, librarians, and counselors to our schools?
Yes, I support bringing back nurses, librarians, and counselors to our schools. E​ducation is a top priority in California and has been a central part of my policy and advocacy work. I was President of the Board of Education, and I currently serve as Chair of the City and School District Committee. I have led the way to ensure that San Francisco is increasing resources and money for its schools. Last year, I was the lead author of the Public Education Enrichment Fund (PEEF), which allocated $81.76 million in city funding for fiscal year 2014­2015. These funds have proven to be sound investments in our schools and youth. In the last decade, critical PEEF sports, libraries, arts and music funding has ensured that every San Francisco public school has a librarian, that regular professional development training occurs for visual arts and performance instructors (where before there was none), and that the number of professional training classes for athletics instructors has more than tripled. The general education portion of the Public Education Enrichment Fund has enabled the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) to triple the number of students enrolled in grades K­8 receiving individual and/or group health and mental health services through student support professionals over the past five years, with the number of high school students receiving five or more counseling sessions at the wellness center more
t h a n d o u b l i n g i n t h e l a s t 1 0 y e a r s​. I w o u l d l o v e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o c o n t i n u e t h i s w o r k i n S a c r a m e n t o . I f elected, I will work with stakeholders to improve public schools statewide­­especially schools that disproportionately serve students with great needs. In addition, it is crucial we restore tax equity by amending tax loopholes like proposition 13 which and protecting laws that provide school funding like proposition 30 and 98. Furthermore, we must continue improving our education system in order to close the achievement and opportunity gap. These improvements can be made by protecting the due process rights of our educators, and eliminating the voucher program and reinvesting those funds back into our public schools. These are some of the ways we can progress towards a more improved public school system. We have a responsibility to invest in the education and success of our youth. California currently ranks 46th in per pupil spending­­with only Texas, Nevada, Idaho and Arizona trailing behind­­and that is unacceptable.
10. Do you support school facilities bonds to provide matching funds for modernizing school facilities?
Yes, I support school facilities bonds to provide matching funds for both modernizing school facilities and building new schools in neighborhoods that lack them. I​am currently working on getting SFUSD to build its next school in Mission Bay, San Francisco’s newest and fastest growing neighborhood with a growing population of young families, and to include it in San Francisco’s 2016 school facilities bond. When residents began moving into Mission Bay in 2007, the City's demographers could not have predicted the influx of young couples and families that live in this growing neighborhood. The Mission Bay library branch's afternoon story time program is packed with babies and young children from the neighborhood. In October, the City and School Joint Select Committee, which I chair, held a hearing on enrollment projections and recommendations on educational and school infrastructure needed to accommodate new student enrollment due to San Francisco's explosion of residential development. Between 1994 and 2008, San Francisco experienced decreasing enrollment, but since 2008, enrollment has been increasing and will continue to increase. Demographers analyzed new major developments in four neighborhoods­­Hunters Point Shipyard, Candlestick Point, Mission Bay, and Parkmerced. Mission Bay/South of Market is projected to have 2,122 K­12 students by 2040. And right now, Mission Bay is teeming with families with babies and toddlers! In the future, kindergarten classes in San Francisco will be at capacity and will not have enough spots for all of our kindergarten­aged children. This is why it is important to build a public elementary school in Mission Bay. Building a school in Mission Bay is also important for keeping families in Mission Bay and San Francisco. While a site has already been identified, a lot of advocacy and organizing needs to happen to make this a reality.
11. Do you favor maintaining the caps on school district reserves so as to ensure that the districts spend funds on educational needs?
Yes, school districts need to ensure that they have adequate funds for educational needs at all times.
Adult Education
1. What are your ideas about retaining adult education?
Just as I support keeping students in school and ensuring that they graduate, I also support adult education. City College of San Francisco is in the midst of an accreditation crisis. We need to ensure that community colleges throughout the state provide quality and affordable education to students of all ages.
Classified Employees
1. Will you oppose efforts to contract out classified jobs?
Yes, I will oppose efforts to contract our classified jobs. I am committed to advocating for union jobs in all sectors, including the educational sector.
2. Currently classified school employees receive $2000 in death benefits from CalPERS. Would you support an effort to increase the benefit amount that these employees receive?
Yes, I would support efforts to increase benefit amounts that classified school employees receive.
3. During tough budget times, classified employees are usually the first to be laid off at our K­12 schools and community colleges. Would you support legislation that would restore some of these eliminated positions?
Yes, I would support legislation to restore eliminated positions of classified employees that were laid off.
4. Will you oppose additional legislative efforts to require or make voluntary the administration of medication to students by unlicensed, nonmedical school employees?
Yes, I will oppose legislative efforts to require or make voluntary the administration of medication to students by unlicensed, nonmedical school employees. If administered incorrectly, prescription drugs could seriously harm a child’s health and even kill the child, and thus should only be administered through an appropriately trained and licensed provider. This ensures that if a negligent mistake is made, we can revoke a person’s license, if necessary, to ensure that the mistake is never repeated.
Higher Education
1. Are you committed to maintaining student access to community colleges, CSU, and UC by stopping or reducing fee/tuition hikes?
Yes, I am committed to maintaining student access to community colleges, CSU, and UC by stopping or reducing fee/tuition hikes. We need to ensure that all colleges in California continue to provide quality and affordable education to students of all ages.
2. Will you speak out when universities give administrators large pay increases even as students and parents are suffering from reduced class offerings and ever higher fees?
Yes, I will absolutely speak out when universities give administrators large pay increases when students and parents are suffering from reduced class offerings and higher tuition/fees. We need to ensure that all colleges in California continue to provide quality and affordable education to students of all ages.
3. Do you believe that community college should be free or nearly free to all who wish to attend?
Yes, I believe that community college should be free or nearly free to all who with to attend. We need to ensure that all community colleges in California continue to provide quality and affordable education to students of all ages.
4. Do you support giving part­time community college faculty the same salary and benefits (pro­ rated) as full­time instructors?
Yes, I support giving part­time community college faculty the same salary per hour and benefits (pro­rated) as full­time instructors.
5. An ever­increasing number of UC classes at the University of California are taught by lecturers, which are represented by CFT (through UC­AFT), and do not enjoy the compensation and other rights of tenure track faculty. What are your ideas to motivate the University to compensate and treat lecturers fairly?
I look forward to working with CFT and other educator advocacy organizations to brainstorm ideas on motivating the University of California to compensate and treat lecturers fairly.
6. UC is decreasing the number of university librarians. Do you support maintaining or increasing library services by trained librarians?
I support maintaining or increasing library services by trained librarians. Library services are an integral part of a student’s education.
Budget
1. Do you support Proposition 98 as the floor and not the ceiling for public education?
Yes, we must expand and strengthen Proposition 98 and all of its guarantees.
2. Do you support an extension of Proposition 30?
Yes, Proposition 30 has provided much needed funding towards our public education
system­­funding needed to get our state back on track to having one of the nation’s best education systems.
3. Do you support changing the commercial property tax portion of Proposition 13 to make it fairer for new and established businesses?
Yes, amending Proposition 13 will help close tax loopholes without placing a heavy burden on new/small businesses.
4. Do you support allowing local school and college districts to pass parcel tax increases by a 55% majority vote as is currently the case with facility bonds?
Yes. I am also open to lower the threshold to increase resources available to school districts.
Pensions for Teachers and Classified
1. Are you aware that teachers and community college professors in California are not part of Social Security?
Yes, those that do not participate in CalPERS or Social Security are enrolled in CalSTRS.
2. Do you support pensions for all public employees?
Yes
3. In California, teachers are part of CalSTRS and classified employees are part of CalPERS; and
UC lecturers and librarians are part of the UC pension system. Will you oppose reducing CalSTRS, CalPERS, or UC pensions from a defined benefit plan to a 401k style defined contribution or hybrid plan?
Yes
Health Insurance
1. Do you support giving the Insurance Commissioner the authority to approve rate increases in health insurance?
Yes
2. Do you support a single payer system such as Medicare for all?
Yes, I support a publicly administered universal health care system (i.e. “single­payer”). Although the Affordable Care Act has insured 3 million Californians, more than 3 million remain uninsured. Medicare should be expanded to include everyone. I​would request to meet with union leadership and membership to listen to their concerns and priorities and discuss how to coordinate efforts to achieve a publicly administered universal health care system in California
Campaign Assessment
1. Please assess your candidacy as compared to the other candidates. Be specific in your comparison.
I have built a strong base of support through my community activism and time in office. My policy experience, compassionate vision, and personal outreach all contribute to my reputation as someone who will fight for everyone in the district and, in particular, those who too often do not have a voice in our government.
With housing costs on the minds of voters throughout the Bay Area, I have been at the forefront of advocating for policies to create more affordable homes ­­ standing up to even the San Francisco Giants to build more housing that is affordable to low­income and middle­class families. I have worked hard to craft innovative solutions to this pressing problem and am currently leading the effort to put surplus city property to use to develop new housing.​At the same time, I have stood up for tenants’ rights, passing the boldest tenant protections to stem frivolous and profit­incentivized evictions.
I also worked to close the wage gap, leading the successful effort to pass the most progressive minimum wage law in the nation. And I have built the coalition to bring new business ­­ and new jobs ­­ to the Mid­Market district, an underutilized commercial area in San Francisco.
At a time when voters are worried that low­income and middle­class families are being priced out, my office has fought to make sure the Bay Area continues to be welcoming to people of all walks of life ­­ and I will be able to stand on this proven progressive record in this election.
With women representing only 26% of the current California State Legislature, I personally believe it is critical to elect women in 2016 and in particular, progressive Democratic women who will fight for issues that most impact the lives of women, children, and families. In 2016, 10 women will term out of the California State Legislature, 6 in the Assembly and 4 in the Senate. If these termed­out female legislators are not replaced, and other women are not elected, there will only be 13 women serving in the Assembly (13 out of 80 legislators) and only 8 women serving in the Senate (8 out of 40). In addition, approximately 25% of Senate District 11 voters identify as Asian (and 37.5% are foreign born) ­­ we need strong, culturally­competent leadership that can effectively advocate for our communities at the state level. Senator Carol Liu will term out next year, leaving only one female Asian­Pacific Islander State Senator ­­ Republican Janet Nguyen.
Further, my long­time advocacy in San Francisco has provided me with the opportunity to build a strong relationship with constituencies that are key to success in this District, namely progressive organizations, women, and Asian Americans. In the less than a month that I have been in the race, I secured endorsements from such leaders and groups as the California Legislative Women’s Caucus, Senators Hannah­Beth Jackson and Holly Mitchell, Assemblymembers Phil Ting, Lorena Gonzalez, and Cristina Garcia, and many local and community leaders. And she has already made great strides in securing support in San Mateo, having received the endorsement of the Mayor of Daly City, Ray Buenaventura. Her base of support with each of these constituencies makes her well­positioned for victory in this District.
2. Please attach a list of endorsements, including elected officials, community leaders, and unions.
Organizations:
● California Democratic Legislative Women’s Caucus
● Korean American Democratic Committee
Elected officials:
● State Senator Holly Mitchell, SD30
● State Senator Hannah­Beth Jackson, SD19
● Fmr. State Senator Carole Migden, SD3
● Assemblymember Phil Ting, AD19
● Assemblymember Cristina Garcia, AD58
● Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez, AD80
● Fmr. Assemblymember Tom Ammiano, AD17
● San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi
● San Francisco Supervisor John Avalos
● San Francisco Supervisor David Campos
● San Francisco Supervisor Norman Y ee
● San Francisco Supervisor­Elect Aaron Peskin
● Fmr. San Francisco Supervisor Bevan Dufty
● Fmr. San Francisco Supervisor Jack McGoldrick
● Fmr. San Francisco Supervisor Bill Maher
● Fmr. San Francisco Supervisor John Bardis
● Daly City Mayor Ray Buenaventura
● School Board Vice President Matt Haney
● SF School Board Commissioner Sandra Lee Fewer
● SF City College Board Trustee Brigitte Davila
● Jefferson Elementary School Board Member Marie Brizuela
● Jefferson Elementary School Board Member Manufou Liaiga­Anoa’i
● Jefferson Elementary School Board Member Shakeel Ali
● Congresswoman Kyrsten Sinema (AZ)
● Congressman Joaquin Castro (TX)
Appointed leaders:
● Dori Caminong, Commissioner, San Francisco Entertainment Commission
● Petra DeJesus, Commissioner, San Francisco Police Commission
● Darryl Honda, Vice President, San Francisco Board of Appeals Member
● Victor Hwang, Commissioner, San Francisco Police Commission
● Perla Ibarrientos, Member, Daly City Personnel Board
● Davi Lang, Commissioner, San Francisco Animal Control and Welfare Commission
● Steven Lee, Commissioner, San Francisco Entertainment Commission
● Allan Low, Vice President, San Francisco Recreation and Park Commission
● Marily Mondejar, Executive Director, Filipina Women’s Network and Commissioner, San
Francisco Community Investment and Infrastructure Commission
● Bryant Tan, Commissioner, San Francisco Entertainment Commission
● Cindy Wu, Commissioner, San Francisco Planning Commission
● Christine Johnson, Commissioner, San Francisco Planning Commission
● Kathleen Courtney, Chair of Housing and Zoning Committee
● James Chang, Commissioner, City of Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board
Community leaders:
● Gordon Chin, Founder, Chinatown Community Development Center
● Malcolm Yeung, Deputy Director, Chinatown Community Development Center
● Peter Gallotta, Co­President, Harvey Milk Democratic Club and Geary Corridor Bus
Rapid Transit Citizens Advisory Committee Member
● Lee Hepner, Harvey Milk Democratic Club – Executive Board Organizing and Member,
San Francisco Board of Supervisors Sunshine Ordinance Task Force
● Reverend Glenda Hope
● Andrew Russo, Director, San Francisco Family Support Network
● Rob Gitin, Executive Director, At The Crossroads
● Carrie McFadden, National Committeewoman, California Young Democrats
● Peter Stevens, Co­President, UC Hastings Democrats
● Cleve Jones, Community Activist
● Christian Huang, Executive Director, City Impact
● Tony Kelly, Potrero Boosters
● Obai Rambo, Chair and President, The California Young Democrats Renters Caucus
● Chris Hyland, Vice Chair, Sunshine Ordinance Task Force
● Carletta Jackson­Lane, Executive Director, Sojourner Truth Foster Family Service
Agency, Inc
● Michael Pangilinan, President, Filipino American Democratic Club of San Francisco
A full list of my endorsements can be found on my website at http://www.janekim.org/endorsements
3. How much money have you raised and what is your campaign budget?
I have raised just over $100,000 since I announced my candidacy. I intend to raise up to the voluntary expenditure limit­­$846,000.
Rev.8/20/15
§Billionaire Contributions For Charter Candidates
by Labor Video Project Sunday May 27th, 2018 10:47 AM
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The California Charter School Association CCSA which is run by union busting racist billionaires is spending many millions for it's candidates in California elections.
§ Former LA mayor Antonio Villaraigosa With Billionaire Union Buster Eli Broad
by Labor Video Project Sunday May 27th, 2018 10:47 AM
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Former LA mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was actively supported by national union busting billionaire Eli Broad who has trained pro-charter union busting superintendents throughout the United States. Villaraigos visited San Francisco as a guest of honor by Jane Kim and claimed he was a man of the people.
§Broad Boot Camp
by Labor Video Project Sunday May 27th, 2018 10:47 AM
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Broad's "boot camps" are organized on how to steal billions from public education for profiteers.
§Charter School Big Business
by Labor Video Project Sunday May 27th, 2018 10:47 AM
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Charter schools are a big business for companies like Apple, Google, Pearson and other profiteers. They now control the California Commission On Teacher Credentials, California Board of Education and most school districts including LAUSD, OUSD, WCCSD, SFUSD where their political operatives continue to push testing, co-locations and more charters, consultants and privatization.