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Challenging the Ruling Economic Orthodoxy: Economics Students Begin to Revolt
by Pete Dolack
Thursday May 22nd, 2014 4:10 AM
Pete Dolack writes the Systemic Disorder blog. He has been an activist with several groups/
Challenging the Ruling Economic Orthodoxy: Economics Students Begin to Revolt by Pete Dolack, May 9, 2014

http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/05/09/challenging-the-ruling-economic-orthodoxy/print

more at http://www.freembtranslations.net, http://www.nextnewdeal.net, http://www.foreffectivegov.org, http://www.therealnews.com and http://www.onthecommons.org

"Economics students of the world have nothing to lose but their ideological chains. A revolt appears to be brewing — an international coalition of economics students has issued a public call for the teaching of a variety of schools of thought so that the field might actually find solutions to the world’s problems.

This is a radical departure. Orthodox economics, dominated thoroughly by Chicago School ideology, exists to justify extreme inequality and class dominance, which is why its adherents, who occupy critical financial posts around the world, continue to implement ruinous policies. At universities, the teaching of economics is similarly dominated by the Chicago School.

Not all students are content with this state of affairs. The international coalition International Student Initiative for Pluralism in Economics has issued a manifest taking direct aim at the extraordinarily narrow curriculum. What makes this especially noteworthy is that this coalition comprises 42 student associations in 19 countries — and has a web site in seven languages. The manifesto says:

“This lack of intellectual diversity does not only restrain education and research. It limits our ability to contend with the multidimensional challenges of the 21st century — from financial stability, to food security and climate change. The real world should be brought back into the classroom, as well as debate and a pluralism of theories and methods. … [P]luralism carries the promise to bring economics back into the service of society.”