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Oakland's 6-minute visual presentation on the glories of the coming mass displacement
by Oakland Department of Planning and Building
Tuesday Apr 22nd, 2014 2:55 PM
Music has been added to the video to make it even that much more fun to watch.
Copy the following to embed the movie into another web page:
download video:

wosp-westoaklandspecificplan-oak038755.mp4 (229.4MB)

The original West Oakland Specific Plan (WOSP) video was silent -- perhaps for planning staff to speak over as they promote swinging the city's doors wide open to developers, current residents be damned (http://www2.oaklandnet.com/oakca1/groups/ceda/documents/agenda/oak038755.wmv 1gb). God knows what they say behind closed doors.

Audio added starts with a clip from The Coup's "Fat Cats, Bigga Fish" (Genocide & Juice), proceeds into the Imperial Death March from some 1970s science fiction movie, and ends with the first few minutes of "Underdogs" (Steal This Album), also from The Coup.

The sometimes-jerky video is 3D-modeling developer eye-candy produced by the City of Oakland, paid for by a 2010 $2 million federal grant through the TIGER II Planning Grant program, jointly administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, to support a coordinated planning effort for two adjoining redevelopment areas: the Oakland Army Base Redevelopment Area (OARB) and the West Oakland Redevelopment Area (West Oakland). http://www2.oaklandnet.com/Government/o/PBN/OurOrganization/PlanningZoning/OAK028334

See http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2014/04/21/18754580.php for more information.

Comments  (Hide Comments)

by Jean Tepperman, EBX
Tuesday Apr 22nd, 2014 3:31 PM
A new comprehensive report on gentrification in Oakland and San Francisco received much attention last week from Bay Area news outlets. But one of aspect of the report — and perhaps the most striking claim in it — went mostly overlooked: the argument that gentrification is not inevitable.