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U.S. | Environment & Forest Defense

The Inside Line: Donna Carpenter, Burton and the fight to sustain snowboarding
by Protect Our Winters (POW)
Saturday Feb 22nd, 2014 11:33 AM
Protect Our Winters (POW) was started in 2007 by pro snowboarder Jeremy Jones who witnessed first-hand the impact of climate change on our mountains. After having been turned away from areas that had once been ride-able and seeing resorts closed due to lack of snow, Jeremy saw a gap between the winter sports community and the action being taken by us all to address the problem. Our mission is to engage and mobilize the winter sports community to lead the fight against climate change. Our focus is on educational initiatives, advocacy and the support of community-based projects.
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The Inside Line: Donna Carpenter, Burton and the fight to sustain snowboarding

February 18th, 2014 by Kelli Lynn Hargrove, Snowboard Magazine

In 1977, Jake Burton began building snowboards in a barn in southern Vermont. In the 36 years since, Burton has maintained an ever-present influence in the snowboarding world, continuously creating and innovating new gear, while consistently pushing the boundaries of what is possible on-snow. Today, Burton’s products are tried and trusted, as can be gleaned by the stacked roster of riders that choose to use Burton gear, or the simple fact that Burton has remained an industry staple since the day it stepped onto — or rather, breathed life into — the snowboarding scene.

Now, with the realities of global warming and the mistreatment of the environment omni-present and weighing heavily upon the industry, the company is taking strides to become a fully sustainable brand. Jake’s wife, Burton Co-Owner and President Donna Carpenter explains that now, more than ever, she wants the company to be transparent, to utilize new materials and new methods of production to debut products that will help extend the life of snowboarding, instead of poisoning it.

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