SF Bay Area Indymedia indymedia
About Contact Subscribe Calendar Publish Print Donate

California | Environment & Forest Defense

Natural Desalination would bring new rivers of fresh water to California - Ending Droughts
by Joseph Rizzi
Monday Dec 23rd, 2013 10:06 PM
Natural Desalination/ Not Desalination = eliminating all issues with traditional Desalination by using RO and natures forces to desalinate ocean water and convey it to shore and near zero cost and energy
Natural Desalination uses ZERO man made energy to desalinate new RIVERS of water with little to no environmental issues.
• Ocean water needs 1,000 psi to desalinate water using Reverse Osmosis (RO).
• Off shore at ½ mile under the water you get 1,000 psi for the outside of a RO tubes.
• A flexible air pipe from the surface down to the RO system would bring air and 0 psi pressure to the inner part of RO tubes.
• The difference between the RO outside pressure and inside pressure gives a constant 1,000 psi
• Constant free flowing salt free water flows into the RO tubes which can be collected and sent back to shore
• Gravity would carry the water to shore in a pipeline or tunnel.
• Once at shore the water would be lifted for use or put in aqueduct or other transportation systems.

Advantages of Natural Desalination:
• Can supply all of California with drought resistant water supply for crops and people.
• No brine because only water is taken from the ocean, located far off shore an near the ocean floor helps too.
• Large area for RO system for expansion with no impact to coastal residents.
• Little to no impact to ocean, plants or sea creatures; and no shipping hazard, due to location and design.
• Side benefit of increased water would be more farming, increased economic, more oxygen, cleaner air, etc..
• Droughts, Delta, water quality, sea level rising and many other water issues can be decreased or eliminated.
by Mike Novack
Tuesday Dec 24th, 2013 1:45 PM
"• Ocean water needs 1,000 psi to desalinate water using Reverse Osmosis (RO).
• Off shore at ½ mile under the water you get 1,000 psi for the outside of a RO tubes.
• A flexible air pipe from the surface down to the RO system would bring air and 0 psi pressure to the inner part of RO tubes.
• The difference between the RO outside pressure and inside pressure gives a constant 1,000 psi
• Constant free flowing salt free water flows into the RO tubes which can be collected and sent back....

Uh, it flows into the air filled tube (at the start). So you have some fresh water at the bottom of that half mile down air filled pipe. You now have to pump it up 1/2 mile to get it to the surface. That takes the SAME amount of energy as it would have taken to have done the entire process at the surface in the first place pumping through the membrane so you could have saved that half mile long pipe.

That pipe CAN'T simply be full of water flowing all by itself to the surface because the you wouldn't have that 1000 psi pressure difference.

Hey, high school physics teachers, how about collecting these schemes being posted on the internet. Might make good extra credit problems for you students "why won't this work".

by Joseph Rizzi
( Joseph_Rizzi [at] sbcglobal.net ) Sunday Jan 19th, 2014 11:10 AM
The air / Pressure tube to the surface from the desalination field is to bring the ZERO pressure to the inner part of the RO filed and tubes. The fresh water flows down hill from the RO tubes to the collection area and out the bottom to the shore. Yes this means that at shore the water would be more than half a mile down and would need to be pumped up. Pumping water up is only a small fraction of the cost compared with traditional Desalination tubes needing to be presurized to 1,000 psi along with the fulusing of water needed.
by Tom Dewey
Sunday Jun 8th, 2014 2:52 PM
Floatation of a light weight flexible tank might solve the problem or use the principle of fresh water being less dense in some way. Otherwise the cost will probably still be high. I was wondering if there is a creature that naturally desalinates like a bacteria or a sea sponge.