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Why “The Lone Ranger” is Not “Just” a Movie
by Michelle Shining Elk
Tuesday Jul 2nd, 2013 5:36 AM
It keeps being said about the upcoming movie “The Lone Ranger”, “it’s just a movie,” it’s not going to “change the world.” Well, I wish that were true and I wished this were JUST about “a movie.” But sadly, it goes deeper and farther back than many realize, or have taken the time to think about, especially when considering how we, as Indian people, are perceived by mainstream society and the perpetual time warp we are stuck in because of how we continue to be portrayed in film and television.
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Why “The Lone Ranger” is Not “Just” a Movie
By Michelle Shining Elk

It keeps being said about the upcoming movie “The Lone Ranger”, “it’s just a movie,” it’s not going to “change the world.”

Well, I wish that were true and I wished this were JUST about “a movie.” But sadly, it goes deeper and farther back than many realize, or have taken the time to think about, especially when considering how we, as Indian people, are perceived by mainstream society and the perpetual time warp we are stuck in because of how we continue to be portrayed in film and television.

It’s all about framing and I advocate re-framing the negative images. Framing…what do I mean? Framing can be subtle or invisible, harmful stereotypes or perceptions that cause problems that are more overt that manifest themselves in all degrees of subtlety. How is the damage done – because all of these things are embedded in the public psyche and roll into our modern day existence and continue to be seen everywhere. We are trapped in a muddy time warp and defined by stereotypes and historical images that are NOT accurate by any stretch of the imagination. The “Injun say how!” way Depp delivers his character “Tonto” is NOT helping, no matter how much “courting” he and Disney are doing to get “in good with the Indians.”

Any group that has an interest in obtaining or achieving success in the world, at large, understands that portrayals have consequences. Hollywood continues to portray American Indian people in ways that perpetuate damaging stereotypes and inaccurate depictions of who we are and that, in turn, affects all outside interactions, perceptions and understandings that mainstream has of us – worldwide. Lost and seemingly unknown is the fact that we are current, educated, relevant, multi-dimensional people and tribal nations, and NOT the images, symbols, portrayals or caricatures that exist and constantly used in film and television to define us.

This is about the baggage, the Hollywood baggage we can’t seem to ditch. The baggage that, has for decades, created inaccurate perceptions of who we are as the first people of the Nation. Baggage we have been trying to dump for years.

Hollywood caters to popular culture – popular culture is comprised of predominantly members of the majority (we are not in this mix, just so you know). In this, Hollywood has, and continues to, propagate misinformation, skewed perspectives and inappropriate depictions of who we truly are as NDN people.

What’s the big deal you might ask? Well, the big deal is that we continue to end up being defined by inaccurate depictions and skewed perspectives because the members of the majority (the group that doesn’t include us) internalizes the misinformation and depictions as fact and the way things are (when it’s completely not the way things are), because they do not know any better. It’s a sad fact, but true.

It’s time we change the public paradigm about who we are — the one shaped by Hollywood and non-Natives. People keep saying, “It’s JUST a movie”. Well, I’m not JUST an Indian willing to accept perpetuating damaging stereotypes for the sake of “JUST A MOVIE”. Depp made promises that he would move away from damaging stereotypes and provide a more well-rounded “Tonto” but he failed and regardless of what anyone wants to say, or think, Depp’s been driving this bus since the day he became an Executive Producer and took the film off the “dead” projects shelf.
Some say “It’s a new era, modern day movie, made to entertain…get over it.”

I say, “Yes, it is a new era, modern day movie, but when is our cultural group going to stop being the entertainment?” It’s a new era, but yet we continue to face, and be forced to deal with these old problems. When is enough, enough?
It’s time that we place ourselves into the American society equation as a contemporary force and as a people of interest that is nothing like the damaging stereotypical images and depictions that continue to define us.


http://lastrealindians.com/why-the-lone-ranger-is-not-just-a-movie-by-michelle-shining-elk/
§Johnny Depp & The Never Ending Hollywood Indian
by Michelle Shining Elk Tuesday Jul 2nd, 2013 5:41 AM
Johnny Depp & The Never Ending Hollywood Indian
By Michelle Shining Elk

Hollywood Baggage. This day in age, we still have Hollywood baggage that perpetuates American Indian stereotypes. We are in what century? Oh right…the 21st. Guess Depp didn’t get the memo when he was preparing for his role in “The Lone Ranger.”

How we (as American Indian people) are described or portrayed, even this day in age, has a significant impact on how we are perceived, taken seriously, or respected.

Thanks Johnny Depp for perpetuating a grossly erroneous stereotype of how Indians speak – then and now. You brought NOTHING to the table in so far as your usually amazing acting skills.

Like teachers influence their students throughout their scholastic programs, so do people in all forms of media and entertainment who misrepresent us as American Indian people and continue to perpetuate the stereotypes as they influence their fans, readers, listeners, followers and viewers. Thus…the perpetual cycle of stereotypes and misinformation continue seemingly without end.

Popular culture, which is predominantly members of the majority constantly propagate misinformation, skewed perspectives and inappropriate depictions of who we are as First Nation American Indian people. This misinformation always ends up being internalized by those who don’t know any better or how to decipher the difference between fact and fiction.

I get this movie is a “period piece”; however, never was there a time when our ancestors or our elders spoke the way Depp portrays Tonto in the upcoming Disney release “The Lone Ranger.” Thanks Johnny Depp for not exercising your gifts of being an amazing actor who is typically able to bring amazing life to your characters using that talent. Sadly and so disappointing is seeing that all you have done here is simply mimic the pathetic speech patterns created and always depicted in the ridiculous stereotype plagued lot of Hollywood Spaghetti Westerns films.

Of course, those who don’t get it, will argue or tell me to lighten up because this is a remake of “The Lone Ranger” which was shot in the 1930s-40s or that I “should just get over it.”

But here is the deal…while this may be a remake of a 30s-40s television show, the technology and special effects used to make this movie will surely remind audiences throughout the 90 minute process that it is anything but a true “period piece” and that it’s a modern day flick. As such, I don’t think it’s cockamamie that I would have expected Depp to deliver his lines in a more modern and realistic manner and not like a caricature from a John Wayne movie, or 1920s cartoon.

From the Boston Tea Party to Hollywood movies to the New Age Movement, we as First Nation American Indian people are stuck in a time warp of misconception created by Hollywood and mainstream America about how this country thinks we were, and we are. We are forever stuck with the perception that we are uneducated, irrelevant, non-contributors to society living in tee pees out on the plains…stuck in time as 19th Century “Redskins.”

Sadly, it seems that until we rid ourselves of the “Hollywood baggage” that plagues the truth about who the contemporary, relevant, talented, thought leaders that we are, the room for us to get our messages across is the size of a matchbox. But, we’ll keep on fighting the good fight.

I’m glad so many American Indians garnered work and some income from this movie, but sadly there is no way I’ll be able to sit through 90 minutes of watching Johnny Depp act like an idiot and sound like a buffoon.

http://lastrealindians.com/jonny-depp-never-ending-hollywood-indian-michelle-shining-elk/
http://www.michelleshiningelk.com
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The White Man's Indian: Stereotypes in Film and BeyondCharalambos VrasidasTuesday Jul 2nd, 2013 10:57 AM