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U.S. | Police State and Prisons

America: Police State Ruthlessness Writ Large
by Stephen Lendman
Tuesday Jun 25th, 2013 12:12 AM
police state
America: Police State Ruthlessness Writ Large

by Stephen Lendman

Cold-blooded barbarity reflects US policy. Democracy's more illusion than reality. Rule of law principles don't matter. They're systematically spurned.

Dissent's increasingly targeted. Freedom's imperiled. Obama's ruthless. He exceeds the worst of George Bush. He's waging war on truth-tellers. He targeted more whistleblowers than all his predecessors combined.

Merrian-Webster calls a police state "a political unit characterized by repressive governmental control of political, economic, and social life usually by an arbitrary exercise of power by police and especially secret police in place of regular operation of administrative and judicial organs of the government according to publicly known legal procedures."

The Oxford dictionary calls it "a totalitarian state controlled by a political police force that secretly supervises the citizens' activities."

America raised the stakes higher. It did so with technological ease. It mass-spies everywhere all the time on everyone. It does so lawlessly. Core constitutional principles are violated. Foreign country statutes are defied.

Washington prioritizes state terrorism. It commits global espionage. It does so on an unprecedented scale. It's lawless and unprincipled. It targets federal employees exposing wrongdoing. Acting responsibly is criminalized.

Whistleblowers reflect duty above and beyond the call. Legions more like them are necessary. Sunshine's our best defense. Washington demands darkness.

US-style realpolitik reflects New World Order harshness. Edward Snowden's more than an American hero. His revelations help everyone.

He fled security and prosperity for safety. He took temporary refuge in Hong Kong. On Sunday, he flew to Moscow.

Ecuador's Russian ambassador Patricio Chavez and other embassy staff met him. They did so at Sheremetyevo Airport. He requested asylum.

Russia Today said Ecuador granted him refugee status. Expect he'll get asylum unless he has an unannounced destination in mind.

Perhaps he's granted safe haven elsewhere. Maybe he did it secretly. Given the enormous risks he faces, it makes sense to do so. He needs all the protections he can get.

Julian Assange said he's "in a safe place and his spirits are high. Due to the bellicose threats coming from the US administration, we cannot go into further detail at this time."

"Unfortunately we cannot reveal what country he is in at this time." Perhaps he's in Russia. Maybe elsewhere. He's wise to keep his whereabouts a closely-held secret.

Washington revoked his passport. He's wrongfully charged under Espionage Act provisions. The White House asked Russia to detain  him. It wants him extradited. Moscow responded nyet diplomatically. It did so by not complying.

National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden lied saying:

Snowden's disclosures "suggest that his true motive throughout has been to injure the national security of the US, not to advance internet freedom and free speech."

She expressed disappointment with Hong Kong authorities. They let him leave despite Washington's "request to arrest him for purposes of his extradition under the US-Hong Kong Surrender Agreement."

"We have registered our strong objections to the authorities in Hong Kong as well as to the Chinese government through diplomatic channels and noted that such behavior is detrimental to US-Hong Kong and US-China bilateral relations."

Expect little sympathy in return. America's waging political and cyberwar on China. Lawless spying and hacking were revealed. Beijing and Hong Kong aren't pleased.

Xinhua is China's official press agency. It called ongoing US practices "troubling." America's "the biggest villain in our age," it said.

Hayden said Moscow's decision to let Snowden travel to Russia further complicates bilateral relations.

Chuck Shumer (D. NY) calls himself Israel's Senate "guardian." Others call him US senator from AIPAC.

On CNN's State of the Nation, he said:

"The bottom line is very simple: allies are supposed to treat each other in decent ways, and Putin always seems almost eager to put a finger in the eye of the United States, whether it is Syria, Iran and now of course with Snowden."

He's "aiding and abetting Snowden's escape."

Senator Lindsey Graham (R. SC) told Fox News Sunday:

"I don’t think he’s a hero. I believe he hurt or nation. He compromised our national security program designed to find out what terrorists were up to."

"So, the freedom trail is not exactly China, Russia, Cuba, Venezuela. So, I hope we’ll chase him to the ends of the earth, bring him to justice and let the Russians know there will be consequences if they harbor this guy."

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) told CBS Face the Nation she doesn't believe Snowden's a whistleblower.

"Whatever his motives are - and I take him at face value - he could have stayed and faced the music. I don't think running is a noble thought," she said.

Washington wants him arrested wherever he goes. It asked Ecuador not to admit him. It wants him extradited. It wants him silenced. It wants him brutalized like Bradley Manning.

It wants other potential whistleblowers warned. Hopefully they're emboldened to tell all. It's more than ever a national imperative.

On Monday, an unnamed senior administration official said:

"Mr. Snowden's claim that he is focused on supporting transparency, freedom of the press and protection of individual rights and democracy is belied by the protectors he has potentially chosen: China, Russia, Cuba, Venezuela and Ecuador."

"His failure to criticize these regimes suggests that his true motive throughout has been to injure the national security of the US, not to advance internet freedom and free speech."

On Monday, Russia Today said Snowden left Moscow at 14:04 local time (11:04 GMT). He's traveling on Aeroflot flight SU 150. He'll fly through US air space briefly en route to Havana.

A follow-up report said he wasn't seen on board. Two seats (17A and C) were reserved in his name. RT correspondent Egor Pishunov's aboard.

"(S)omething out of the ordinary is definitely happening," he said. An unnamed airport security team member said Snowden remains in Sheremetyevo's transit zone.

What's ongoing isn't clear. Perhaps SU 150 is clever deception. Maybe Snowden's airborne on an unannounced flight. Perhaps he will be later. Maybe he arrived secretly at an undisclosed destination.

Given Washington's intensive targeting, traveling secretly makes sense. Snowden's safety demands extreme precautions. He's not entirely safe anywhere.

America governs lawlessly. CIA hitmen operate everywhere. An unnamed State Department official said:

"The United States has been in touch via diplomatic and law enforcement channels with countries in the Western Hemisphere through which Snowden might transit or that could serve as final destinations."

"The US is advising these governments that Snowden is wanted on felony charges, and as such should not be allowed to proceed in any further international travel, other than is necessary to return him to the United States."

Washington's going to extraordinary lengths to get him. Jean le Carre couldn't have written a more riveting espionage thriller. He's 81. Perhaps he'll do one on Snowden.

His 1963 novel titled "The Spy Who Came In from the Cold" remains his best know work. It was an international best-seller.

Snowden's no spy. The Whistleblower Who Came In from the Cold might be a suitable title. Sub-plots could include others doing the same thing. Le Carre might have another winner.

Spanish jurist Baltasar Garzon advises WikiLeaks. In 1998, he indicted Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet.

He said "what is being done to Mr. Snowden and to Mr. Julian Assange - for making or facilitating disclosures in the public interest - is an assault against the people."

Snowden's not safe anywhere. Disappearing entirely won't help. When America's long arm goes all out, targets remain vulnerable.

Assassins "R" Us reflect official US policy. Abductions and disappearances are commonplace. Capture and eliminate are prioritized. Covert operatives are experts at finding people.

Techniques include bribing, pressuring, threatening, and otherwise intimidating targeted officials to comply. America can exert enormous coercion.

It's hard resisting strong-armed tactics. They'll be exerted full-force against Snowden. He knows and said so.

"I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions, and that the return of this information to the public marks my end," he said.

"There's no saving me. I do not expect to see home again."

Some things matter most, he added.

"The great fear that I have regarding the outcome for America of these disclosures is that nothing will change. (Ahead they'll be) tyranny."

That and harmful effects on his family worry him most. "That's what keeps me up at night," he said.

It should give everyone sleepless nights!

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at lendmanstephen [at] sbcglobal.net.

His new book is titled "Banker Occupation: Waging Financial War on Humanity."

http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanII.html

Visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com.

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