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California Trust Act Moves Forward
by Steve Pleich
Sunday May 19th, 2013 2:50 PM
Trust and Equal Protection Under the Law
Last December, in an act of political expediency that shocked and dismayed many immigration activists, Governor Brown declined to sign into law the California Trust Act. Undeterred, the Assembly, led by San Francisco Assembly member and equal rights champion Tom Ammiano, introduced the bill once more. As many of us who have been actively working for the complete abolition or significant revision of the federal Secure Communities Program know, cooperation by local Sheriff's Departments, including our own, with the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has worked to substantially abridged the rights of our Latino/Latina community to Equal Protection under the law. And just as troubling is the seed of "distrust" for law enforcement that this program has sown in their community.

According to the California Immigrant Policy Center, 93,500 Californians have been deported under the Secure Communities Program. Secure Communities was conceived as a mechanism to identify "serious and/or felony offenders" in the Latino population and provide a procedure for detention by ICE following arrest. However, the program as a practical matter has resulted in the detention and deportation of Latinos who were charged with minor criminal offenses or, worst of all, were categorized as "noncriminals" according to SComm's own definitions and standards. In point of fact, our county's noncriminal deportation rate is nearly 90%!

Understand this, Secure Communities is not a federal law. It is a federal program and as such local law enforcement is free to exercise its discretion with respect to the scope of individual agency participation. Our own California Attorney General Kamala Harris has confirmed that upholding “hold requests” are voluntary and are not required by local law enforcement agencies. Some elected sheriffs such San Francisco's Mike Hennesey have taken a courageous and principled stand to favor "opting out" of the program altogether. As Sheriff Hennessey so eloquently stated:

"as the sheriff of San Francisco for more than 30 years, I know that maintaining public safety requires earning community trust. We rely heavily on the trust and cooperation of all community members – including immigrants – to come forward and report crimes, either as victims or as witnesses. Otherwise, crimes go unreported – and this affects everyone, citizens and noncitizens alike. It also leads to “street justice,” in which residents who are too afraid to go to the police decide to take justice into their own hands, often with deadly result. San Francisco has always been a city of immigrants. We are proud of our diversity. We value the contributions of immigrants to our community. Law enforcement and other civic leaders work hard to serve all of our residents in an effort to promote the health and safety of our neighborhoods. Unfortunately, Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s controversial Secure Communities program violates this hard-earned trust with immigrant residents. Under this program, the fingerprints of everyone booked into a county jail are conveyed electronically to ICE, which checks them against its own database to see if deportation should be considered. This applies to even a minor matter, such as having no driver’s license in one’s possession in a traffic stop".

With a Latino/Latino community that comprises nearly 30% of our 260,000 residents, we too are a community of immigrants who are proud of our diversity and we too must urge our Sheriff to take the same courageous, principled stand. To be fair, Sheriff Phil Wowack has been responsive to the vocal and continuous activism on this issue. ACLU Santa Cruz County, SCCCCOR's Immigration Act Group and the Santa Cruz County Immigration Reform Team continue to work in solidarity in hopes that new and more narrowly defined protocols and assessment tools will be developed in the absence of the complete abolition of the Secure Communities Program that we continue to advocate for.

And so we come full circle to the issue of Equal Protection. It has always seemed to me that when justice is denied to anyone of us, it is denied to us all. The Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States guarantees equal protection under the law to all persons who are subject to the jurisdiction of our state and our county. That guarantee is not, and cannot, be based upon the color one one's skin or the status of one's residency. So the next time ICE puts a detention hold on a young Latino or Latina based solely on the color of their skin or the status of their residency remember that your rights to equal protection are being detained and abridged just as surely as theirs.

Comments  (Hide Comments)

by John E. Colby
Sunday May 19th, 2013 10:12 PM
Thank you for sharing the detailed information about this Act. I was not aware of this Act nor it's struggles through the legislature and with the governor.

Consequently, I found this piece very informative. It was very helpful. Thank you for putting out a clarion call for the passage of the California Trust Act.
by Robert Norse
Wednesday May 22nd, 2013 11:21 AM
Thanks to Steve Pleich for articulating the issues that were brought forward by a visiting activist to the largely closed ACLU meeting last night.

Particularly helpful and illuminating some of the stats (assuming them to be accurate). The reintroduction and progress of Ammiano's California Trust Act challenging the "Secure Communities" Program (language reminiscent of the misleadingly named "Public Safety Citizen Task Force" recently appointed by Mayor HIllary Bryant locally) is positive

It's chilling to hear Pleich's figure that our county's noncriminal deportation rate is nearly 90% with a Latino population he estimates at nearly 30% of our 260,000 residents.

However, perhaps Pleich can clarify how "Sheriff Phil Wowack has been responsive to the vocal and continuous activism on this issue. ACLU Santa Cruz County, SCCCCOR's Immigration Act Group and the Santa Cruz County Immigration Reform Team continue to work in solidarity" given Wowak's obstructive and clearly toxic (to deportees) refusal to implement the clear Board of Supervisors' directive last year to stop bogus deportations ?

The http://politic365.com/2013/05/20/trust-act-advances-in-california-legislature-again/ website reports that "From January to March of this year, some 5,000 Californians have been deported and most of these people did not have serious convictions." A local Public Records Act request might further uncover how many have been seized from the Santa Cruz County jail due to the refusal of Sheriff Phil Wowak to follow the Board of Supervisors.

Wowak's refusal to follow the Board of Supervisors resolutions trying to support local families threatened with break-up for minor infractions is noted at http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/localnews/ci_20359290/secure-communities-shift-worries-domestic-violence-prevention-groups and http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/localnews/ci_22149228/santa-cruz-county-sheriff-no-immediate-changes-secure .

Also noteworthy is the failure of Pleich and the local activist community to protest this policy through direct action and mass protest. Understandably many of the potential victims feel anxious about being targeted if they exercise their public First Amendment rights. However more privileged (i.e. white-skinned) members of the community have had that option for over a year following the passage of the Supervisor's resolution and the refusal of Wowak to respect it.

It's akin to the general silence on the treatment of homeless people, the imposition of local curfews criminalizing peaceful political activity at night at the County Building, It has its echo in general local silence around Obama's assassination lists, drone strikes, surveillance expansion, failure to prosecute torturers, and massive whistleblower witchhunts.

Perhaps equally repellent is what seems to be the surrender of principles in the service of not offending those in political power. I fear we are seeing a steady erosion here from folks like Pleich.

I was impressed with Pleich's insistence on supporting ending the Sleeping Ban through two City Council election campaigns (which impacts undocumented workers as well, of course) , his accessibility to homeless people (at the Monday night Red Church meal and through his Homeless Persons Assistance Project), and his support for Occupy Santa Cruz (which, though it had few Spanish-speakers, was pressing for broader rights generally for those on the lower end of the income scale). However these contradictory and hollow statements around Secure Communities disturb me. In not holding the officials who are destroying the families responsible, they show undue regard for Wowak (a powerful politician) and his allies--probably in the hope of later "diplomatically" influencing them.

Objectives can also become obscured and tainted In climbing the ladder to political power, the primary objective becomes to make connections, secure allies, and gain respectability. One can often convince oneself that one is doing this in aid of basic principles, or to protect a class of oppressed people. But in so doing, one in practice surrenders the original principled goal. Unfortunately the climb to power can be and usually is profoundly corrupting.

Monday night (5-20) as Vice-Chair of the ACLU meeting, Pleich continued the practice of choosing power over principle in excluding the public from the monthly Board of Directors meeting of the ACLU and not raising homeless civil rights issues locally that he has been repeatedly urged to do. (See "ACLU Chair Closes Monthly Boad of Directors Meeting, Homeless Issues Off the Agenda" at http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2013/05/21/18737162.php).
by Sin Barras member
Thursday May 23rd, 2013 2:06 AM
To quote Robert Norse:

"The http://politic365.com/2013/05/20/trust-act-advances-in-california-legislature-again/ website reports that "From January to March of this year, some 5,000 Californians have been deported and most of these people did not have serious convictions." A local Public Records Act request might further uncover how many have been seized from the Santa Cruz County jail due to the refusal of Sheriff Phil Wowak to follow the Board of Supervisors."

Submitting a California Public Records Act (CPRA) request about ICE deportation and reporting information to Sheriff Phil Wowak has already been proposed by a Sin Barras member.