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Santa Cruz Indymedia | Environment & Forest Defense | Health, Housing, and Public Services

San Lorenzo River washes plastic waste on Seabright beach after storm
by Skidmark Bob
Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM
Documenting San Lorenzo river storm wash creating ocean/beach pollution on Seabright beach.

On the early morning of 12-24-2012 (xmas eve) after our last big storm. I was exercising down at Seabright beach, it was bright sunny and good to be out after a weekend of hard rain. As I approached the big rock on the beach I noticed all the logs, trees, and wood debris that the river normally deposits on the beach after a storm, as I got closer to shore I started to notice an overwhelming amount of plastic garbage that has also covered this once beautiful beach. Sprawled on the shoreline was plastic bottles (mostly gator aide/liquor) plastic lighters, plastic cups, dishes, tiny liquor bottles, plastic bags, Styrofoam, 3 needles, golf/tennis balls even a Longs shopping cart (only the plastic part) clothes, car seat, 3 tires and a smashed plastic trash can.
When I saw all this human waste caused by us humans, my heart sank then I realized that the tide was starting to come in and take it back out to sea. So I took a garbage can liner and started to pick up what I could before long I met up with a woman and a couple who had been the same idea and were doing it closer to the lighthouse so we split up the work and were able to get most of it. I pulled 5 garbage bags full of plastic waste off the beach.
I wanted to share these photos of what it looked like when I got there before we cleaned up.
I think people need to understand that whats thrown away outside or on the street all eventually ends up in a storm drain, river or creek that all dump into the ocean.

Save Our Shores have banner signs at some SC beaches that have cleanup bags available.
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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM

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by Skidmark Bob Monday Dec 31st, 2012 11:09 PM


Comments  (Hide Comments)

by brent adzmasndmski
Tuesday Jan 1st, 2013 5:00 PM
I've spent at least 30 minutes nearly every day on the main beach for the past 8 years and weekly for the past 14 years.
This is a pretty normal occurrence following a big storm and during El Nino years it is especially pronounced.
From Boulder Creek all the way to the river's mouth various debris collects and isn't washed down stream until the river rises to access the items carrying them downstream and onto the beaches. I have vivid documentation from the storms of 1997 where the beaches were packed with plastic and other items.
by Robert Norse
Wednesday Jan 2nd, 2013 9:21 AM
...and I thought it was those dirty homeless campers and the evil needle users that were the environmental terrorists.

Who wooda thunk it?

Somebody quick run and tell Take Back Santa Cruz and Analicia Cube.

And the Public Safety Committee of the City Council that is considering their latest anti-homeless schemes in a week or two.

Tip of the hat to Skidmark Bob and to T.J. Magallanes (the Clean Team) who are alerting the public and actively cleaning this shit up.

Campers, whereever you are, pack out your trash and responsibly dispose of your needles!
by .cp
Wednesday Jan 2nd, 2013 9:30 PM
I have noticed that - standing by the river during the first big storm and seeing a stream of plastic floating out - I think a lot of people sit by the edge of the river drinking soda. I don't think these are all being washed down storm drains.

On another occasion, I had the sort of scary experience of walking along the beach in front of the boardwalk in the morning, and I kept coming across bundles of hypodermic needles (of all things) rolling around at the edge of the surf. They were sets of about 15+ needles of the same type, wrapped together with rubber bands. I set about four bundles on top of a trash can at the boardwalk.