SF Bay Area Indymedia indymedia
About Contact Subscribe Calendar Publish Print Donate

U.S. | Global Justice and Anti-Capitalism | Police State and Prisons

FBI Agents Raid Homes in Search of “Anarchist Literature”
by Will Potter, Green Is the New Red
Monday Jul 30th, 2012 10:32 PM
When FBI and Joint Terrorism Task Force agents raided multiple activist homes in the Northwest last week, they were in search of “anti-government or anarchist literature.”

The raids were part of a multi-state operation that targeted activists in Portland, Olympia, and Seattle. At least three people were served subpoenas to appear before a federal grand jury on August 2nd in Seattle.

In addition to anarchist literature, the warrants also authorize agents to seize flags, flag-making material, cell phones, hard drives, address books, and black clothing.

The listing of black clothing and flags, along with comments made by police, indicates that the FBI may ostensibly be investigating “black bloc” tactics used during May Day protests in Seattle, which destroyed corporate property.

If that is true, how are books and literature evidence of criminal activity?

To answer that, we need to look at the increasing harassment, surveillance, and prosecution of anarchists and political activists associated with the Occupy Movement.

In some cases, such as the May Day arrests in Cleveland, the FBI has been so desperate to arrests “anarchist terrorists” that it supplied them with bomb-making materials and used an informant to entrap them. The same thing happened in Chicago.

The motivation for these operations, and the instruction that “anarchist” means “terrorist,” is coming straight from the top levels of the federal government. As I recently wrote, new documents show that the FBI is conducting “domestic terrorism” training presentations about anarchists.

The FBI presentation described anarchists as “criminals seeking an ideology to justify their activities.”

This is the guilt-by-association mentality that is guiding FBI and JTTF assaults on political activists; if agents find “anarchist literature” in a raid, it is evidence of criminal activity because anarchism, in and of itself, is criminal activity.

The Seattle grand jury may or may not be investigating May Day protests. What’s clear, though, is that the grand jury is being used as a tool in this criminalization of those suspected as “anarchists.” Grand juries are secretive processes that are frequently used against political activists in order to acquire information. They are fishing expeditions. If activists refuse to testify about their personal beliefs and political associations, they can be imprisoned. Jordan Halliday, for example, was recently released after serving more than six months in prison (and being imprisoned once already for four months) for asserting his First Amendment and Fifth Amendment rights and refusing to provide information about the animal rights movement.

As one organizer with Occupy Seattle said after the raid: “…we are not being raided for connection to any crime, but to some political ideology that the police think we have.

“I was just doing research on the old Pinkerton strikebreaking paramilitaries, so it’s kind of funny, you know, to have that old Red Scare history burst through my front door at six AM.”


Comments  (Hide Comments)

by cp
Wednesday Aug 1st, 2012 5:57 PM
Hopefully it isn't too inappropriate to speculate on what events (if any!) are being investigated here. But when I read the reference to destruction of federal property, the first and only incident that comes to mind in the Portland/Seattle region is the May day march in Seattle where a couple of people following a largely peaceful crowd were filmed throwing items at the window of the federal courthouse.

To show you what a fishing expedition this is, the TV helicopter footage shows that only between 1-4 people actually damaged a window, and *they were arrested*. The main guy, who was speaking and acting strangely at the scene has schizophrenia, and wasn't part of any organization. The police already have these folks in custody, and anything after that (especially if they are raiding houses where the local activists last lived months or a year ago) amounts to fishing around for names.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2018136540_suspects04m.html

In fact, I wasn't entirely happy with the list of about 50 organizations signing the petition against these recent raids, because even though it indicates widespread support, it might announce the existence of the groups to the same FBI office. For example, I looked up a group that apparently exists in my city that I hadn't heard of.

This is footage from a comics fan in Seattle called Phoenix Jones who has a hobby of dressing as a superhero character (like batman) and patrolling the downtown nightclub district on weekend evenings. He seems like an okay, or interesting guy and has a good record of interrupting violent assaults and car thefts. Anyway, he was filming by the federal courthouse as this happened. One or two of the people by the federal building sharply criticize him, and Jones later appeared on a radio show to explain that he's apolitical, and did not pepper spray anyone. The key here is that only a handful of people were involved, and they have already been detained.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kR3dmRXGJg
by Patrick Kelley
( patrick.kelley [at] ic.fbi.gov ) Saturday Aug 4th, 2012 11:53 AM
I am so sick of the FBI's lack of ethics, integrity, rationality, and function.