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Peninsula | Global Justice and Anti-Capitalism

Tesla Employee's Private Plane Hits E. Palo Alto Daycare Center
by Eye on E. Palo Alto
Wednesday Feb 17th, 2010 7:08 PM
Miraculously no one was injured in a daycare center shortly after 8 a.m. this morning when three Tesla employees, apparently headed to southern California on company business, crashed their plane into a house in an East Palo Alto neighborhood. Corporate media reports indicate that the private plane that took off from the tiny Palo Alto Airport in heavy fog was owned by a Tesla employee and that at least one high level executive may have been among the three who died in the crash.

Last December Ricardo Reyes, Tesla's VP of Communications, said "we've got a start-up to run here" as he dismissed a group of people who tried to make him aware of their concerns about Tesla's building a new factory on a toxic site in Downey, California. Tesla's CEO has been criticized for rushing off to Washington in a private plane not long after lawmakers berated the heads of the Big Three automakers for doing the same thing while seeking a government bailout. Some in Silicon Valley and elsewhere are left wondering: Is Tesla too busy running a start-up to make wise decisions?


Is Tesla in too big a hurry to be the next big thing?

In December 2009, Ricardo Reyes, Tesla's VP of Communications, said "we've got a start-up to run here" as he dismissed a group of people who tried to make him aware of their concerns about Tesla's building a new factory in Downey, California. The group, California Coaltion for a Worker's Memorial Day, asked that the electric car company take their time and carefully weigh the consequences of building on what is known as a brownfield, or "cleaned up" toxic site.

Downey is the site of a former NASA plant, which was redeveloped before toxic chemicals were adequately removed. Employees of Downey Studios and Kaiser Hospital, both built on that site, have presented with unusual symptom clusters that have been attributed to exposure to toxic chemicals.

Wired.com reported in recent days that the CEO of Tesla Motors, which has received a "fat federal loan", flew to Washington, D.C., aboard a private jet at least 12 times in the past 14 months. Elon Musk did so not long after lawmakers berated the heads of the Big Three automakers for doing the same thing while seeking a government bailout.

Three Tesla employees died when their twin-engine Cessna 310 airplane collided with power lines and then crashed in East Palo Alto this morning, apparently on their way to a business meeting near Los Angeles. The company remains tight lipped on details of crash, leaving many wondering: Is Tesla too busy running a start-up to make wise decisions?