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Pakistan: Musharraf regime reiterates martial law threat US-sponsored deal with Bhutto begins to unravel
by wsws (reposted)
Thursday Oct 25th, 2007 7:42 AM
Thursday, October 25, 2007 :Pakistan’s US-backed military regime has reiterated its threat to impose martial law should the country’s highest court not give its blessing to General Pervez Musharraf remaining president till 2012. It has also reportedly suspended talks with Benazir Bhutto and her Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) about a power-sharing agreement and the composition of an interim government, which would hold office in the run-up to legislative elections next January, until the Supreme Court’s rules on the constitutionality of Musharraf’s “re-election” as president.
“According to insiders,” reported on Tuesday by Pakistan’s largest English-language daily, the Dawn, “the government ... has made it clear that a verdict against Gen. Musharraf could change the entire political scenario, especially the understanding with the PPP.”

Musharraf, whom the Bush administration continues to laud as a pivotal US ally, has repeatedly tried to bully the court and the Pakistani people into accepting the legitimacy of the sham October 6 presidential election by saying that otherwise he will refuse to step down as head of Pakistan’s armed forces and could impose martial law. In mid-August, US secretary of state Condoleezza Rice reportedly had to telephone Musharraf twice in a single day, including once at 2 a.m., to dissuade the general from declaring a national emergency.

Responding to an earlier government threat that a ruling against Musharraf could result in martial law, Justice Javed Iqbal, the head of the Supreme Court panel that is hearing the challenges to Musharraf’s election declared October 18, “These threats have no value for us. This is an issue to be decided in accordance with the law and according to the merits.”

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