SF Bay Area Indymedia indymedia
About Contact Subscribe Calendar Publish Print Donate

U.S. | Animal Liberation

Call your Representation on Monday to protest AETA
by PCRM
Sunday Nov 12th, 2006 10:52 AM
The House of Representatives is set to vote on a bill that could stop people from protesting or speaking out about cruelty to animals. While the bill takes aim against violent protests, it could also be interpreted to ban even peaceful protests, letter-writing, or leafleting that make animal abusers feel “intimidated” or “harassed.” It would even eliminate the kinds of undercover investigations that have revealed the cruelties in laboratories and farms.
The Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act

The House of Representatives is set to vote on a bill that could stop people from protesting or speaking out about cruelty to animals. While the bill takes aim against violent protests, it could also be interpreted to ban even peaceful protests, letter-writing, or leafleting that make animal abusers feel “intimidated” or “harassed.” It would even eliminate the kinds of undercover investigations that have revealed the cruelties in laboratories and farms.

H.R. 4239, misnamed the “Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act” was pushed by those who run farms, circuses, rodeos, and testing labs, and it sailed through the Senate. It is now before the House of Representatives in what is called the “suspension calendar,” a list of bills that the Representatives believe have no opposition. Learn more about the AETA.

The vote could take place as early as Monday. But we can stop this bill if you call your Representative first thing. All you have to do is to say this bill goes way too far, and that it needs to be pulled off the suspension calendar.

Here’s how you can help:

1) Call your representative direct on Monday (or use the switchboard 202-225-3121)

2) Send a follow-up e-mail.

3) Forward this information to your family and friends.

Remember, all contact info is at http://www.house.gov

The AETA has already passed in the Senate. The House of Representatives has not heard enough opposition to keep it off the calendar with bills considered uncontroversial. Unless Congressmembers hear that this bill undermines First Amendment rights, the majority may vote for passage as soon as Congress reconvenes tomorrow, Nov. 13.

-----------------------

For more information on AETA and the organizations opposing it, visit

http://noaeta.org/


Comments  (Hide Comments)

by from repost
Sunday Nov 12th, 2006 8:51 PM
to send a email to your representative, follow the link.

https://secure2.convio.net/navs/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&id=149

background from NAVS..
http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2006/11/08/18328114.php
Tom Petri, in a safe rebublican district, defeated his Democratic write-in opponent John Curry in Tuesdays "wave" election.

For some more on what type of guy Petri is, supporting torture against people and animals, read on:



On Nov. 7 voters in Adams and Marquette counties will have a choice between re-electing Rep. Tom Petri, R-Wis., or voting in Democratic write-in candidate John Curry of Waupun to fill the 6th Congressional District seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Curry, a write-in candidate who failed to get the 5,000 votes necessary in the Sept. 12 primary election to have his name appear on the Nov. 7 ballot, is in the midst of his first political race. He is running against Petri, who has served for 27 years as a Congressman, sine 1979.

...

Curry said he is running because he disapproves of the way the current Bush administration is running the country and that his opponent, Petri, tends to run unopposed.

Petri voted for the Military Commissions Act of 2006 which Curry says violates rights such as that to challenge being detained. Curry said it allows the president to define torture and those facing charges aren't allowed to see all of the evidence that may be gathered against them. It was passed in the House and Senate after the U.S. Supreme Court ordered that the current way the administration was dealing with detainees suspected of terrorism was unconstitutional.

Petri defends act

Petri contends that with the passage of the Military Commissions Act of 2006 detainees will be dealt with according to the constitution. He said the act does not allow the president to define what is and is not torture and that those held in custody would have to have access to evidence against them or else it wouldn't be admissible in court.
Curry also criticized Petri on a bill he introduced, the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act.

"In that bill anybody who protests an animal enterprise loses their First Amendment rights. It makes a direct assault on the First Amendment and the right to protest," Curry said.

Petri defended the bill, saying it has bi-partisan support. The bill would allow charges at the federal level to be brought against individuals who harass or threaten people involved with animal enterprise. The definition of animal enterprise is expanded to include a commercial enterprise "that uses or sells animals or animal products for profit." It includes furriers, breeders, animal shelters, and pet stores. The bill provides penalties for people who purposefully damage property or "cause bodily harm or place a person in reasonable fear of death or bodily harm," according to a column provided by Petri's office.

Petri said he supports the right to express opinions and to convince others of the worthiness of their cause, but wants to protect researchers and business owners from extremists.

"That is the line we're trying to draw," Petri said.

Curry sees a need for change in other areas besides the Military Commissions Act of 2006 and the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act.

"The first thing that has to be done that hasn't been done is to make government accountable to the people who elected them," Curry said.