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Thu Jan 26 2006 Jean-Juste Update
1/29/2006: Haitian political prisoner Gerard-Jean-Juste has been released from prison. He arrived in Miami on Sunday after Haiti's government granted him a temporary release from jail to be treated for leukemia and pneumonia. He is undergoing tests and treatment at Miami's Jackson Memorial Hospital. Reverend Jesse Jackson warned Gerard Latortue that he would be on the next plane to Haiti if the seriously ill Father Gerard Jean Juste was not released immediately for medical care. Jean-Juste's lawyers at the Bureau des Avocats Internationaux (BAI) have filed an appeal, asking for the charges to be dismissed. The appeals court can rule on the appeal without Fr. Gerry’s presence, so it is possible that the case will be dismissed without requiring him to return to court.
Read More | Corporate Coverage &Video From Miami

On January 25, Dr. Jennifer Furin of Harvard Medical School examined Amnesty International Prisoner of Conscience Fr. Jean-Juste. Dr Furin reports that the condition of the activist priest, jailed on trumped up charges since July 2005, is worsening. She writes, "Over the last four days [Fr. Jean-Juste] has had a fever and cough, and was diagnosed with pneumonia. His blood cell counts have dropped markedly due to the leukemia, and he appears extremely pale, fatigued, and with visible skin bruises due to his rapidly advancing disease." Father Jean-Juste requires immediate hospital-level care for this deteriorating condition. Further, given his precipitously low blood cell counts‹significantly worse than two weeks ago‹it is imperative that he also receives immediate treatment for his leukemia. Without this treatment he will die in prison.

Also on January 25, international human rights lawyer Brian Concannon called the State Department to demand Fr. Jean-Juste¹s release. Concannon reports he ³was told that they continue to believe that the Haitian justice system is following its normal course. They deny that Fr. Jean-Juste is a victim of persecution. They do not intend to do anything different than what they have been doing, which is to urge that the justice system process his case and give him medical treatment.

Half-Hour for Haiti: Enough is Enough, Release Fr. Gerry Now | Haiti's invisible "Big Boss" is keeping Father Jean-Juste in Prison | Letter from a Haitian Prison | Previous Coverage Of Jean-Juste
The commander of the MINUSTAH (United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti) forces, General Urano Bacellar, was found dead on January 7th with a bullet in his head. It is unclear whether he was murdered or whether it was suicide, but it is known that he was constantly being pushed to escalate the occupation of local neighbourhoods in Haiti. In particular, they demanded that UN troops occupied and acted with "more energy" in the local districts of Porto Principe (Port Au Prince), with the justification being that groups in those areas had been involved in recent kidnappings. Human rights activists state that the real reason is the persecution of opponents to the current regime.

The death of the general has left doubts about the political scene in the country. Presidential and parliamentary elections have been rescheduled for February 7th. However nothing guarantees a substantial change in relation to the current government of Gerard Latortue and Boniface, imposed after 2004 that took President Aristide out of power. Opposition candidates, such as Lavas, are facing problems being accepted. An example of this is father Gerard Jean Juste, who is imprisoned and forbbiden to register. The opponents of the government, whether friendly with Aristide or not, say that the elections are illegitimate, and that they fear repression from MINUSTAH, that could use violence to contain probable protests in districts during the election.

Read More from CMI Brazil | Dossie Haiti | ONU and haitian elite are planning more actions in the local neighbourhoods | Brazilian commander is found dead. Incrise deaths in local neighbourhoods | Indymedia Brasil | Haiti Proges | Haiti Action
Sat Jan 7 2006 Batay Ouvriye
From Haïti Progres:
Both before and after the Feb. 29, 2004 coup d'État in Haiti, Washington infiltrated "democracy promotion" programs into almost every sector of Haitian civil society: political parties, media, human rights groups, student groups, vote monitoring organizations, business associations, and labor organizations.

Recently declassified National Endowment for Democracy (NED) documents reveal that a "leftist" workers' organization, Batay Ouvriye (BO), which promoted and called for the overthrow of the constitutionally elected government of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, was the targeted beneficiary of a US $99,965 NED grant routed through the AFL-CIO's American Center for International Solidarity (ACILS). Listed in NED's "Summary of Projects Approved in FY 2005" for Haiti, the grant states, "ACILS will work with the May 1st Union Federation- Batay Ouvriye [ESPM-BO] to train workers to organize and educate fellow workers."

Read More | Haiti Democracy Project, Not So Democratic | Posts From Batay Ouvriye: 1 | 2 | 3
Mon Dec 19 2005 Haiti's Elections
Haiti's election dates have now been reset for the fourth time in the last five months. The Interim Government of Haiti (IGH) will now miss the February 7, 2005 deadline for transferring power that it had promised to meet for 21 months.

Voting registration stretched past the August deadline into October, because registration facilities were not installed in poor urban and rural areas. An international outcry pushed the CEP to expand the opportunities to register, and eventually about 3.5 million people reportedly registered, out of an estimated pool of 4.2 million eligible citizens. The latest schedule calls for a first round of Presidential and legislative elections on January 8, a runoff election on February 15, and local elections on March 5. Several remaining hurdles make reaching this goal unlikely, including distributing electoral cards, printing the ballots, recruiting and training electoral officials and establishing enough voting centers. The electoral cards pose a particular challenge.

The distribution of the electoral cards is complicated, involving alphabetical order and date of registration, and the urban and rural poor who had so much difficulty registering often lack access to radio, television or other means of hearing the announcements. The schedule leaves five weeks before the first round to distribute the cards (and hire and train officials and find facilities for voting centers, which the CEP announced it was starting to do on November 30), when registration alone took over five months. Those particular five weeks may be the hardest of the year to get things done. They include Christmas, Haiti's Independence Day on January 1 and the beginning of Carnaval season on January 8, and much of that is school vacation.

Read More | Taking us to democracy like cattle to the killing house | Haiti's Achievements Under Aristide Now Lost Since The U.S. Led Coup | Haiti sacks Supreme Court judges | Why would I trust this fake election? | Haiti poll postponed a third time | In support of Batay Ouvriye
According to Juan Gabriel Valdes, the head of the United Nations Mission for the Stabilization in Haiti (MINUSTAH), the upcoming Haitian elections scheduled for January 8 will mark "a major victory for the electoral process". A central strategy in preparing for the vote is MINUSTAH's Disarmament, Demobilization and Reinsertion (DDR) campaign. In theory, DDR offers both sides of the political conflict in Haiti-armed Lavalas supporters and the former paramilitary death squads and disbanded army who led the Canada, US and France sponsored coup against Jean Bertrand Aristide's FL government--the chance to hand over their arms in exchange for amnesty and reintegration. While the former military have been offered more than 12 million US dollars as a buy-out for their loyalty to the process, Lavalas remains as demonized and destitute as the day the UN began its occupation of Haiti in the name of "restoring democracy." While former death squad leaders like Jodel Chamblain have been set free, Lavalas leaders such as Father Gerard Jean-Juste continue to waste away in prison with little hope of justice.
Read More | Ex-soldiers in Haiti get back pay, refuse to disarm | New Attacks on Cite Soleil Residents by UN Troops
Nicolas Rossier's film "Aristide and the Endless Revolution" is showing in San Francisco from December 9th through 15th. The movie examines the 2004 coup d'etat in Haiti, as well as the systemic violence and human rights violations that have erupted under the interim government. An interview with the deposed president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide in Pretoria, South Africa, is juxtaposed with the views of a wide range of supporters and critics, including US Assistant Secretary of State Roger Noriega. The film exposes the international interests that are concerned with suppressing popular democracy and ending the reforms Aristide was capable of making - despite embargoes and the need to service a debt for loans Haiti never received.

The film is showing at the Roxie Cinema at 3117 16th Street (at Valencia Street) in San Francisco. Showtimes are each evening at 6:15, 8:00, and 9:45pm. There are additional matinees on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 and 4:00pm.
September 30th was the anniversary of the first US-sponsored coup that ousted President Aristide in 1991. An international day of action had been called for September 30th by the Fondasyon Trant Septanm (September Thirtieth Foundation). People were encouraged to have a demonstration on the 30th to denounce the dictatorship and US/UN repression in Haiti, and call for an International Coalition to work for the return of democracy in Haiti, the return of the President, and the establishment a fund, administered by the September 30th Foundation, to support victims of repression in Haiti.

Demonstrations took place in two Bay Area cities on the 30th: a morning rally and picket in San Francisco at the Federal Building, and two protests in San Jose, the first a lunchtime protest at the French Consulate and the second at the Federal Building. Protests were scheduled for over 30 other cities around the world including Dublin, Ireland. In Haiti, demonstrations were not allowed to go forward.

Haiti:   2